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Hi Steve:

Just re-read your "Steve's Guide to Threshold, Autotune..."  It helped a lot.  Thanks.  

I do have a question though.  I understand V/SAT.  It's about how fast autotune re-adjusts the threshold after encountering some disturbance like a target.  However, I'm unclear on how that relates to Ground Balancing and Tracking.  It sounds like they are the same.  Would you please explain that?

Thanks

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It does not relate to ground balance or ground tracking at all other than the idea that both controls attempt to manage how the detector reacts to the ground.

Threshold Autotune, SAT & V/SAT are all methods for managing the threshold tone and so they are part of the audio control.

Ground balance and ground tracking are all about how the detector ground balances and how it maintains the ground balance.

You could look at it as ground balance attempting to completely tune out the ground first. Then, whatever ground effects are left can be further managed by varying the autotune speed, if that capability is present in the detector you own. Most detectors have the threshold autotune rate preset by the factory. 

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