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Jin

Large Nuggets - Closer Or Further Away From A Reef

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Ok, this is going to give away my lack of real-life gold hunting experience.

I've heard two different responses to this question so I'm left a little confused and hoping someone can clear this up. 

My question is:  In most cases would the larger pieces of gold travel less and be closer to the source and the smaller pieces travel further away? (this is what I would think would happen)

On the few occasions if found patches I've found the larger bits were closer to the shedding reef but have sometimes experienced the complete opposite with some of my bigger finds a lot further down the slope. (maybe two different sheddings? ... they say that a reef at one time may have been a lot higher, so gold shed at different intervals may be in different spots)

For those that have found patches what has been your observations?

Cheers Jin 

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Hi Jin:

45 minutes ago, Jin said:

My question is:  In most cases would the larger pieces of gold travel less and be closer to the source and the smaller pieces travel further away? (this is what I would think would happen)

The answer to your question is "Yes, but - - - " :smile:

Gold is heavy and therefore is reluctant to move far horizontally from where it was eroded from its host rock - however, erosion over geological time is multi dimensional.

50 minutes ago, Jin said:

they say that a reef at one time may have been a lot higher, so gold shed at different intervals may be in different spots)

That, in a nutshell, is the complication. The gold we detect may well have shed from sources which no longer exist.

- - - all adds to the joys and challenges of prospecting though!

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I have found the larger pieces of gold (not patches), meaning over a 1/4 ounce (not that I have found that many) in the most unusual places that can't be logically or technically explained.  People just tell me "Gold is where you find it".  Sometimes you just have to leave it at that.  GaryC/Oregon Coast

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8 hours ago, GaryC/Oregon Coast said:

I have found the larger pieces of gold (not patches), meaning over a 1/4 ounce (not that I have found that many) in the most unusual places that can't be logically or technically explained. 

I am in that same boat Gary, but have also found patches. I have never to this day though found a source of any of it.

8 hours ago, GaryC/Oregon Coast said:

People just tell me "Gold is where you find it".  Sometimes you just have to leave it at that.  GaryC/Oregon Coast

That is what I have accepted now myself. It was doing my head in trying to find where it had all come from. I now believe that the source's have been totally eroded away. Glaciation has more than likely played a part as well, so where do I start with that??:blink:.

Cheers

Good luck out there

JW :smile: 

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          I have found 10 gm or more above the current shed, but most of the fly sh!t tends to move quickly from the source. The only rule that tends to help me is a distinct  change in gradient away from the shed, tends to hold the large bit longer. Large specimen tend to be close to similar size quartz unless they contain more than 10 Oz of gold.

          It a lottery becauses as mention by other. The factors that can affect the location -How long since it was shed,are there more recent sheds.The slope of ground and the soil erosion is not even. I have found 4 to 6 Oz bits on high spots sun baking in relative flat ground with island of soil just 6 inches higher than most of the ground. I have found when you get more than 100 yards from the source the spots where the number of hits drop off for a while a reasonable bit turns up.

            The answer to your question the larger bit is where you find them

          

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Great question Jin. And nice to see you drop by, haven't seen you here for a bit. Maybe you've been lurking :wink:

And you too JR and geof - haven't seen any other posts for awhile.  

Interested to hear others answers too. Keep 'em coming. 

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Logic would tell you that the bigger heavier gold would well & truly lag behind the smaller lighter stuff. But many times logic is out the window when it comes to gold & its disbursement & distribution. Gold can even appear to have traveled uphill from a source. Either from land upheaval/tilting after the gold had shed & so reversing what the ground is showing today. Or fault displacement. Again after the gold has been laid. Or finer gold can even be blown up above a shedding reef. There are high & dry alluvial deposits here in NZ that are obviously from ancient massively up lifted river systems (I know I am getting away from reefs & shedding gold) but there are also these old high & dry valley systems that when the gold was deposited the valleys have changed direction in there "flow" from when the gold was deposited. There are also wet river systems that are still flowing but have reversed there flow directing. Chuck in glaciation & it is a real head f@*k to try & work out. To the point that I have given up & just enjoy the walks & any gold I come across. No more sleepless nights trying to fathom it out. Cheers.

JW :smile:  

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"Either from land upheaval/tilting after the gold had shed & so reversing what the ground is showing today."

That's something else I've always thought about. I probably need to know more about the period of gold deposits (300 - 400 million years ago - Victoria) and see if there were periods of upheaval afterward which could have changed the way the ground rises/falls.

....A quick search says that the break up of the Gondwana was around 184 million years ago. I'm not sure if that was part of the mountain-building process that formed the mountains we see here in Australia today. But if it was then this may be after gold has formed/shed.

So reading your comments Kiwijw I would take it that a reef may have shed gold down a slope and then sometime later the ground may have been upheaved, buckled, or faulted causing the ground to look completely different.

Cheers Rick

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If you are not familiar with the pocket hunter's techniques for following a trace to the source, you should do a web search for pocket gold.

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29 minutes ago, oldmancoyote1 said:

If you are not familiar with the pocket hunter's techniques for following a trace to the source, you should do a web search for pocket gold.

Great idea, There are also some good books and forum posts around on Loaming, technique which is usually undertaken with a shovel and pan but can also apply to detecting with coarser gold finds and following the trends to the source. also helps to get a layout of the field you are working.

https://www.reedsprospecting.com.au/shop/detail/loaming-for-gold-in-the-21st-century-by-bob-fagan/

https://www.reedsprospecting.com.au/shop/detail/loaming-for-gold/

Please note: I have no affiliation with this seller  and have not purchased from them before, by all reports a reputable seller however please do your own research if planning on purchasing anything from online stores.

hope that helps

 

 

 

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