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Blast To The Past With White’s

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This is what White’s had going for it in 1971 with their line of detectors. I had the 66 TR it being the one to your left. When I got it I just knew I’d never want another. ha

Chuck

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A9401A75-8B41-4F94-9CD5-C1C28773AEF5.jpeg

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I looked to see what was the oldest mag. I had and it was a 1966 . That was the same year I got my BFO detector from White’s,

The odd thing I didn’t see any ad  on a metal detector. Now some years later every metal detector company jumped on the band wagon. So many had Garrett metal detectors on the back cover then.

Chuck

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My first detector was the Coinmaster 4 in 1972, followed by the Goldmaster in 1974.

On my first nugget hunt with a detector in 1973 - White’s Coinmaster 4 with Gold Probe accessory. Never did find a nugget with it.

steve-herschbach-first-gold-nugget-hunt-

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Wow, just look at those prices, they cost a mint!  I could only imagine the finds to be had when you were one of the first using a detector though, especialy with larger objects like coins and so on, I'd imagine they would struggle on small gold.

They look heavy, arthritis and tennis elbow causing machines but they look tough 🙂

I like the big power plug looking thing that plugs the coil in.

Why is your control box held up with your knees Steve? Did you have to carry it separately? It sure has a tiny coil.  Did you get rid of your early detectors? I'd love to own some old classics.  Hang them on the wall.

 

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What I want to know is just where did the time go? This all took place yesterday.

Steve thanks for making the change . I knew I done it but I was just going to let it ride.

I don’t remember when but I got the coinmaster for my wife. I got her interested in coin hunting when she wasn’t looking I’d stick coins in the sand in front of where she was detecting. I never knew if she knew that I was doing that. The like part of detecting kick in for her before I went broke .

Chuck

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17 hours ago, phrunt said:

Why is your control box held up with your knees Steve? Did you have to carry it separately? It sure has a tiny coil.

Simon, if you look at the Coinmaster 4 in the ad, you will see it had a standard rod and coil setup. The Gold Probe was a small 4" "coil on a stick" that substituted for the rod and coil. You were supposed to rig a sling or something for the detector. All this complaining about ergonomics these days - people got no clue!

The Gold Probe was just a 4" coil, nothing special, but it's small size was supposed to help with finding gold. Problem was the detectors had no horsepower and no ground balancing. It took coin size or larger nuggets to set these things off, and even then only in favorable ground. Note in the ad copy they mention a 6 ounce nugget found.

I still have a 1970s era White's Alaskan which is just a Goldmaster in a chest mount box which also has that Gold Probe plus another larger coil on a stick. Here is the 1976 ad copy but mine is a little older. I will post photos of mine one of these days - maybe take it for a spin!

whites-alaskan-detector-ad.jpg

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Fantastic, I'd love to see a video of it in action or even good photos of it.  It's great seeing how things started off.  It sure is crazy we now complain about the smallest things on our detectors when you look back at what they used to be.

 

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I don't remember what model my first detector was, but I DO remember that it was a White's, Then Garrett's, and now after drooling over Minelab's for years, I will have two! Too long ago...and the brain cells are going faster than they are being replaced!

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Great topic. Besides a $19.99 radio shack detector, my first real detector was a Bounty Hunter Rebel (BFO), soon after, a Bounty Hunter Outlaw (w/ Good/ Bad meter). The first White's machine was the Coinmaster V Supreme. What a machine.... NO more digging hot rocks that sound like a coin. :laugh:

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19 hours ago, schoolofhardNox said:

The first White's machine was the Coinmaster V Supreme

I had one of those also, but was too stupid at the time to realize the power I had in my hands with the very first ground balancing metal detector. Ground Exclusion Balance (G.E.B.) was our introduction to VLF ground balancing technology. The funny part is all I focused on was the Coinmaster V Supreme would find nails per swing that my earlier T/R models ignored entirely. If I had caught on to what potential the machine had for nugget detecting things might have been a little different, but I let it go way too soon.

Here is an ad blurb from the 1976 catalog, plus a picture below of a little later model Coinmaster 5/DB (crude discrimination added) at the White's factory. Click on photos for larger versions.

whites-coinmaster-v-supreme-ad.jpgwhites-coinmaster-5-supreme.jpgwhites-ground-exclusion-balance-geb.jpg

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