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Sourdoughmoe

Detecting Old Claim In Alaska

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looks some nice countryside to detect in.  Did you come away with some nuggets? Is that a gun on your hip? far out!  I just have a pick hanging off mine, you know, for digging gold 😄
 

 

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The gun would be for the big grezzly baars.  I'll stick to my brown snakes and drop bears 😉

And yeah, any yella?  Camping for a few days? 

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5 hours ago, Sourdoughmoe said:

Had fun flown 38 minutes out of bethel alaska and detected for 2 hours

And ?.........Gezzzzz, you can't leave it like that. :blink: Talk about dangle the carrot.

Was it good luck out there?

JW :smile:

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Looks as if one has a GMT and the other GP of what I don’t know. I do know that if a Bear came out of the brush you wouldn’t have time to kiss your butt goodbye.

Chuck

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gpx5k and my gmt both mine lend the gmt to my buddy we had fun we made it a quater way up the cat trail befor we had to turn back no color we needed more time maybe next weekend as we only were there for 2 hours. yes that is a pistol on my hip .

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You notice there are two people and one of them has the gun.  When I went backpacking Alaska with my buddy, he started razzing me saying ... "what are you doing with that gun?  That .40 cal isn't going to stop a bear."  I told him that he was correct, it likely would only anger the bear.  But it doesn't have to stop a bear.  It just had to slow *him* down.  He gave me a blank white stare. True story.

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16 hours ago, Andyy said:

You notice there are two people and one of them has the gun.  When I went backpacking Alaska with my buddy, he started razzing me saying ... "what are you doing with that gun?  That .40 cal isn't going to stop a bear."  I told him that he was correct, it likely would only anger the bear.  But it doesn't have to stop a bear.  It just had to slow *him* down.  He gave me a blank white stare. True story.

Hi guys, I am very divided on this type of thing. The bear is in his own habitat just doing what bears or any wild animal does....that is trying to have a life & survive in their "world" that is slowly being eroded from around them. Man is the intruder in their "world". What gives man the right to play god & take a bears life, or far worse, slow it down by crippling it so it will eventually die a slow painful death either from loss of blood, or shattered bone, but most likely from starvation for obvious reasons. Some people I am sure will just shot a bear for shits & giggles & then just walk away & leaver it. Why not just fire a shot to scare it off?  The thing is that man solely goes into the bears territory for his own amusement & entertainment. His life generally  does not depend on having to be there. Even if looking for gold his livelihood isn't likely to depend on it. He is just doing it for the fun & adventure. The bear is there just trying to survive but ultimately fighting a losing battle.  I am sorry..... but I just don't get it. True story too.

JW

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On 6/16/2018 at 3:41 PM, kiwijw said:

 Why not just fire a shot to scare it off?  JW

No offense at all Kiwi but I get the impression you've never been around Grizzlies?  Blackies are one thing (and they have their moments also) but Grizz can be a different ballgame.  Used to cut timber in AK on Chicagof Is. (grizz) and had one experience (didn't go bad) here in Mt.  Actually had two scary ordeals just with Blackies here in Mt. but they also turned out ok with no shots fired.  What I do is pack a .41 mag (warm fuzzy feeling) and also a pocket air horn.  When I get in tight/thick brush I give a few toots on the horn to let any bears know I'm coming.  Haven't had a bear incident in years...as long as you make plenty of noise and don't surprise them.  Generally they hear you coming making noise and leave before you ever see one.  Unfortunately that grizz may/or may not move on hearing you coming?  I think the last thing anyone wants to do is have any incident with Grizz….much less have to shoot?  They can be unpredictable and if it comes to you or him...I completely understand a decision to shoot (and that's if you even have time to draw your weapon)…..  jmho

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Nice bird,   'Champion?'  What's under the cowling?   Gravel bars do create opportunities.  Thanks for sharing.

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