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Steve Herschbach

World Bored With High Frequency Detectors?

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21 hours ago, Reno Chris said:

(not huge changes but small worthwhile ones none the less).

? Any small changes that give a slight sensitivity/depth edge on previous models opens up old known grounds again & keeps the fire within burning. Definitely worthwhile. But yes...there are many to choose from these days, especially in the last couple of years, & it is probably splitting hairs in performance between some of them.

Good luck out there

JW :smile: 

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Of all the VLF gold machines Steve posted, is the EQ800 equal to these detectors, better, worse or what when it comes to nugget shooting?

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I can only comment on the Gold Monster and Equinox 800 as they're all I've got experience with out of the detectors Steve has talked about but I would say they are pretty equal, they each have their advantages and disadvantages, I much prefer the VDI numbers on the Equinox over the Gold Chance indicator on the GM1000, both have depth I would consider to be similar, and both can find gold so small it's terribly hard to find in your scoop.  We are talking little specs/flakes here, I wouldn't call them nuggets.

 I would love to get my paws on a Whites 24k but sadly with no dealer in NZ it's not going to be possible.  I'm sure of all the detectors on the list it's all about what features you prefer but I would guess they'd all be so similar on nugget performance it just doesn't matter which one you were swinging.

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Thanks, it sounds like the EQ800 will do the job for a VLF gold machine.   Looking forward to finding out what it can find, hopefully not too small of gold - LOL  

Reminds me of gold panning as a kid and putting your gold in the tiny vial of water so the gold looked larger haha

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Today I re-watched Chris Ralph's series on the GM-1000 and it does not matter how skilled a person is those video's are relevant to folks young and old, for me they bought back to life the things I had lost in the back of my mind but also I was very impressed with how the GM performs, I am a bit overwhelmed with the amount of LF machines that are on the market which is pushing me further away and makes me want to buy another GMT and or "IF" the 24k is up to scratch then it is on my radar, The GMT shares a lot with my main detector but the GM-1000 has fuelled the fire in me but the Equinox leaves me in no mans land, just not sure what to think about that one,

Another thing that stopped me from using my GMT was in the prospecting mode the MXT just sounds nicer and when paired with the 5.3 Coil it becomes such a hot combination and the lower frequency helps it run smoother in hotter ground and all of these things are just driving me away from LF detectors.

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The EQ 800 with the 6" coil is going to be real interesting on tiny gold. The 11" isn't too shabby on small/tiny gold on its own.

20180307_214651

Crazy small for that coil.

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Love it

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20180303_200312

 

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Bring on the 6 inch coil.

Good luck out there

JW :smile:

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28 minutes ago, PhaseTech said:

I don't think the world is bored with high frequency detectors - actually quite the opposite! VLF sales remain strong here, and a few of my customers have even added one to their arsenal next to their PI (maybe not so much GPZ users). It wasn't that long ago that many prospectors here were quick to say "Don't waste your time with a VLF, just save up and get a PI". I see this attitude slowly changing to something along the lines of "If you can't afford a PI, get yourself a good high freq VLF, and hit the mullock heaps and you will get gold. When you get a bit more experience and funds, get yourself a PI to complement your VLF" 

This is a big change in attitude and I think the reason is partly due to the SDC. The SDC proved that there was and still is A LOT of small bits still lying around the goldfields, and users have quickly discovered that in certain soils, the Gold Monster, Gold Racer,  and now the Gold Kruzer are quite capable of pinging what a lot of people have started calling "SDC Gold" or simply Fly Shit. 

The other reason more are getting into them is the light weight. Sure, VLFs have always been pretty light, but if you compare a Eureka Gold (discontinued not that long ago) to say a Gold Kruzer, things have come a long way! I speak to potential customers every other day who have bad shoulders, bad backs or other injuries where they have hired one of the bigger machines and just can't handle them. 

And lastly, and perhaps more importantly, they work! If people weren't finding gold with these units, they'd slowly get forgotten, and be called toys. Recent units definitely have improved. While the base circuitry in a VLF is the same, little tweaks here and there can make big differences. 

 

I have been telling them over there for the past 4 years that every good prospector should own a good VLF, It just makes good sense, when the Dirt is shallow and bedrock or the junk is thick and fast then there is not substitute for a good VLF. I have soils here that are murder but I always try a VLF just for a quiet life and no wasted time digging junk targets,

There is just no point in using a PI if the ground is low to medium High mineralization, and the chances are the VLF's and LF's will see smaller bits anyway,

A lot of Aussie's get tunnel visioned when it comes to ML PI machines, They are the best no doubt but sometimes have too much power can work against you, But people in Aus are changing their minds because ML have bought out an LF machine they are now prepared to except the fact that VLF's work which is crazy because they have been doing things the hard way all these years because they just won't listen,

Regardless of the brands In skilled hands a VLF is a very powerful tool when deployed in the right environment and with the new Coil technology from the past 5 or 10 years even big Coils can hit real small Gold down to about 0.02 grams on surface Gold using VLF's and with LF's they can be even smaller.

The hardest part about buying a VLF is choosing which one with so many fine offerings available it could drive a person crazy.

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Hi Nenad, You make a very good point about the SDC 2300 opening up many eyes to the "payable" amount of small gold that is still out there & strewn about the goldfields. Gold the big boy machines missed. I cottoned on to a high frequency VLF being an absolute must have alongside my GP, GPX units early in my detecting days. Also now with the Zed. The reality is that the bigger bits of gold just aren't there now like they use to be. Or the ones that are , are still too deep. This now leaves the small/tiny gold which to a VLF is usually surface to very shallow & is the domain of the high frequency units. Always has been. Look at the GB2. Still going strong after all these years. Coil size of the VLF's allow them into places the PI's & Zed cant tread. As much as the Zed is truly a remarkable detector & can find pretty small gold, its 14" coil restricts access into a lot of places the small/tiny gold learks. The PI's are good with the small coils fitted to get into some of these places but still didn't hit on the size bits that the high frequency VLF's do. If I am having a skunk day looming with a big boy detector I can almost guarantee getting some gold if I break out a high frequency VLF. The future now for the VLF's & all detectors I guess is, How much deeper can they be made to get this small/tiny gold? Because it won't be just on/in the surface bedrock or shallow.

There is always going to be far more small/tiny material on the earth's surface than the the bigger larger stuff. Take the fine sands & gravels out in the goldfields. As the material gets larger there becomes less of them. Bigger sure but less of them individually compared to the small/tiny stuff. Gold is no different & so remains the fact there is still a lot of the small/tiny gold still out there. One just has to come to terms with, What is the real reason they are out there looking for gold?? Is it to make it pay its way or to make a living out of it. That is becoming harder & harder to almost impossible these days. Or is the gold just an excuse to get out there into the marvels of mother nature & the great outdoors? I am of the later.   

I don't know that the world is bored with high frequency VLF's, just that we have been spoilt with a flood of them in the last few years. Cheers

Good luck out there

JW :smile:

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