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kiwijw

My Last Few Outings

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great job detecting you guys , and as usual  great looking country .

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John's long approx 1 gram sausage bit of gold there was one hell of a find, bits that size are so rare around here, especially where we were detecting, a brilliant find in such a thrashed area.

In one of your dig holes there John, I believe it was this one

42324595665_c1eb9b1481_b.jpg

if you were to go back to that now you'll find that scape has been attacked again, it's where I found that signal I was certain was a tiny nugget that disappeared on me trying to retrieve it that I was talking to you about, but I didn't have my GM1000 with me to try track it down.  It was on the edge of your scrape.  It was a nice faint signal until I moved it, I managed to get it into my scoop at one point but lost it again in the separation process of the soil in my scoop and then couldn't find it again.  I was rushing a bit as I thought my skunk was broken and got a bit excited.

You did well on your solo day 3 mission.  The little tiddlers are something to be proud of, they're certainly a challenge to find.

A good couple of days, thanks for having me along for the journey.

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Some nice looking pickers there!!

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3 hours ago, phrunt said:

John's long approx 1 gram sausage bit of gold

It was .93 of a gram. :smile: So we weren't too far off guessing its weight at about 1 gram out in the field.

3 hours ago, phrunt said:

if you were to go back to that now you'll find that scape has been attacked again, it's where I found that signal I was certain was a tiny nugget that disappeared on me trying to retrieve it that I was talking to you about, but I didn't have my GM1000 with me to try track it down.  It was on the edge of your scrape.  

Highly likely that there can always be more gold when one piece is pulled out of a crack or crevice. I always rescan my digs for that very reason. If that was a bit of gold it was too tiny for the Zed. Very often if I get a bit of gold in a crevice & the crevice continues for a bit of distance both ways, I will just hack into it. Rake it out & dig into it to hopefully bring more gold out or be able to get my coil deeper into it to get the coil closer to any gold that may be deeper down. Success in doing this has paid off many times with all my detectors. In this particular area you will be aware that the smooth flat schist sheet bedrock (glacial ground) has grass growth growing out of cracks & fractures where soil has built up & given the grass roots somewhere to live. It is these that I run my coil all over this bedrock. Gold hiding in these cracks/crevices as well. Often I will use the blade end of my pick & chop the grass off down to the smooth surface of the sheet bedrock so I can get the coil right down on to the bedrock & over the cracks & crevices. You got to get that coil as close to the gold as you can....if it is there you will know. If not....just keep on at it.

3 hours ago, phrunt said:

It was a nice faint signal until I moved it, I managed to get it into my scoop at one point but lost it again in the separation process of the soil in my scoop and then couldn't find it again.  I was rushing a bit as I thought my skunk was broken and got a bit excited.

A tip for you. When feritting around in your scoop for what may be a tiny bit of gold, do it over your coil so if you lose it it will fall on to your coil. You should get into the habit of doing this over your coil every time. Better still, when you get right down to bugger all in your scoop & you still cant see it. Tip the contents onto your coil & poke & prod & chase the signal around with your finger until you have it isolated. Oh.....And don't forget to use your magnet to save time chasing a bit of ferrous crap.:rolleyes: :biggrin: I can see you going back now with your GM. It is a long way for you to go back to for a tiny speck of "maybe" gold. Magnet...magnet ...magnet grasshopper.:smile: It stops you from having sleepless nights wandering what it may or may not be. The magnet will definitely sort out ferrous. I know you keep saying that you forget about the magnet, but it is just such a valuable tool. It is a detector in itself. You wouldn't forget your detector...or would you? :blink::laugh: 

Good luck out there

JW :smile: 

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Thanks John, some valuable tips there, I can be foolish, I wasn't scanning around grasses and plant life much, they just got in my way so I was avoiding them, now what you're saying here makes complete sense and I really should already know that.  The other insane thing I did even after finding gold under a rock..... I didn't target gold under rocks and read your post and most of your bits that next time came from under rocks! I tap myself on the noggin sometimes and just hear a hollow sound.

I seem to have a real problem with my magnet, I ALWAYS forget to use it, it's on the wrong end of my pick though so I can't get it down into smaller dig holes as the pick gets in the way and this can't be fixed as the handle is fibreglass and has a funny shape end on it with a hole for a hanging strap and just has nowhere to mount a magnet on that end. Once I order my new pick I'll be quickly ensuring my magnet is on the right end and then I'm sure I'll start using it more.

I do plan to go back as soon as possible, I'm not finished there yet for a long time and your big long piece proves there are still good ones there to be found 🙂 I watched the movie again about the area this morning and could just imagine my ring on one of their fingers.

You should be quite pleased with the location yourself, you've done extremely well there lately, better than some of the other places you've been to :biggrin:

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11 minutes ago, phrunt said:

Thanks John, some valuable tips there, I can be foolish, I wasn't scanning around grasses and plant life much, they just got in my way so I was avoiding them, now what you're saying here makes complete sense and I really should already know that.  The other insane thing I did even after finding gold under a rock..... I didn't target gold under rocks and read your post and most of your bits that next time came from under rocks! I tap myself on the noggin sometimes and just hear a hollow sound.

Life is a learning curve & so to is detecting. Things I take for granted that I have learnt just become second nature & I don't even think to pass them on or to mention them. To me the grass growth in cracks & crevices, where gold hides as well, was just common sense. I learnt that in my very early days of fossicking in the creeks & rivers sniping in cracks & crevices. Stands to reason the same for cracks & crevices no matter where they are. Gold being heavy will drop out in these places, trapped until we come along or another geological event disturbs it & moves it on to a new home.

The magnet on the head of your pick should not matter. As soon as you have dislodged a signal & moved it in your scrape out pile just drag & rake your pick head with the magnet on it through the pile. Because the target is now lose because you have moved it in your dig out pile the magnet should latch on to it if it is ferrous. I just do this religiously every time I move a signal. TIP...You need to have moved the signal first. It just becomes habit when you do it every time. Why wouldn't you? Saves a lot of time wasting looking for a bit of ferrous crap. Time best spent detecting for the next signal. Just get into the habit of doing it. Repetition is the mother of skill. Before you know it you will be doing it in your sleep. :biggrin:

Bloody raining again. Damn.

John 🙂 

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OK, I'll bite.  Where is the ring picture?  GaryC/Oregon Coast

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Raining in Queenstown and not here? Is the world about to end??!?!?!??!?

The cracks and crevices is common sense, I'm just so happy to be out there swinging my detector my mind goes blank and I just wander along listening to the threshold not really thinking about where I SHOULD be detecting.  I'll get there, but it's clearly obvious why you get a lot more finds than I do 🙂  You've told me to check the cracks before many times, and that's what I was doing with my VLF's..... 

I think I'm too delicate with my digs too, I take layers off at a time slowly rechecking the hole each time and clearing away the dug out dirt so I don't mix it up.  Once the targets out I normally find it reasonably quickly, just getting it out takes me a long time 🙂  I probably need to be more aggressive with them like you are but I get so worried I'll lose the target doing that.  I guess if I flatten all the dug out soil on the ground I can recheck it if I lose the target.

Ring picture is here 

 

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4 hours ago, phrunt said:

I'm just so happy to be out there swinging my detector my mind goes blank and I just wander along listening to the threshold not really thinking about where I SHOULD be detecting. 

:laugh::laugh: Ha Ha....There in lies the difference....You really do have to be thinking about where you are poking your coil. Especially in places like that that have been thrashed. It isnt even thinking outside of the square. Gold is heavy so you need to be on the lookout as to where heavies could be trapped. Observation & imagination are your key assets in looking for gold. Detecting the throw out piles you can just go into a trance & a signal sounding off will snap you out of it. That gold has already been disturbed from its natural resting place & thrown out higgledy piggledy & can be just anywhere in the piles. Usually though in the top bit as that was the last bit thrown out by the old timers as they got down on to the paylayer. So that gold just comes down to a bit of luck as to weather it is there or not. Just a matter of waving your coil over a bit. Not too much thinking required. But those throw out piles can be a good source of "easy" gold. As you found out with the three bits that you got. The old timers have done the hard work for you. They found the gold, but just threw some away. Bless them.

4 hours ago, phrunt said:

I think I'm too delicate with my digs too, I take layers off at a time slowly rechecking the hole each time and clearing away the dug out dirt so I don't mix it up. 

You are swinging a 4500 & 14 x 9 coil now. Not a high frequency VLF chasing fly shit gold. Your PI set up is going to go deeper than what you are use to. The secret is to move the signal as quick as you can. Not pussy foot around with the dig but get stuck into it. Once you have moved the signal...it is yours. Time is of the essence when out in the field. Hence the magnet to sort out ferrous....Next signal please.....:biggrin:

JW :smile: 

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