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    • By phrunt
      I stumbled across this video on Youtube, I'm not sure if it's real, it seems unrealistic, far too much gold and huge bits....  The killer is the 90 gram.
       
    • By mn90403
      The SS Central America had lots of coins and lots of treasure to say the least.  We has a presentation (with coins and gold nuggets) at a PCSC meeting in Downey, California last year.  The author said this book was coming.
      I don't see much of a preview online but it may be a reference book that will show up in your local library!
      https://www.coinworld.com/news/us-coins/new-reference-details-gold-silver-recovered-in-2014-from-ss-central-america
    • By phrunt
      https://www.news.com.au/technology/science/archaeology/ultrarare-diamond-with-another-diamond-inside-found-in-siberia/news-story/fc36004d80fd986200447dffab326b4f
      Miners have unearthed an ultra-rare diamond with a second diamond inside it.
      The inner gem is loose inside the first diamond, moving around freely — and could be the first example of such a diamond ever found in the world.
      This rare gem is believed to have formed around 800 million years ago.
      It was dug up by Russian diamond miners Alrosa at the Nyurba mine in Siberia.
      Scientists then used X-rays and other scanning techniques to confirm the presence of a second diamond inside the first. A diamond within a diamond has wowed the world.Source:Supplied
      “Based on the results of the study, the scientists made a hypothesis about how the crystal was formed,” Alrosa said.
      “According to them, there was an internal diamond at first, and the external one was formed during the subsequent stages of growth.”
      The gem has been dubbed the Matryoshka diamond after the Russian nesting dolls of the same name.
      The outer stone weighs 0.62 carats, while the inner gem weighs 0.02 carats.
      “As far as we know, there has been no such diamond in the history of global diamond mining,” said Oleg Kovalchuk, of Alrosa.
      “This is really a unique creation of nature, especially since nature abhors a vacuum.
      An X-ray view of the diamond inside another diamond.Source:Supplied
      “Usually, in a case like this, the minerals would be replaced by others without forming a cavity.”
      He added: “The most interesting thing for us was to find out how the air space between the inner and outer diamonds was formed,” said Oleg Kovalchuk, of Alrosa.
      The diamond will now be sent to the Gemological Institute of America for further analysis. Researchers haven’t estimated its worth yet — it will be difficult due to the gem’s rarity, they say.
      However, they do have one theory as to how it formed.
      “A layer of porous polycrystalline diamond substance was formed inside the diamond because of ultra-fast growth,” Alrosa scientists explain.
      “And more aggressive mantle processes subsequently dissolved it.
      “Due to the presence of the dissolved layer, one diamond began to move freely inside another — just like a Matryoshka nesting doll.”
    • By Tnsharpshooter
      https://metaldetectingforum.com/showthread.php?t=277106
    • By jrbeatty
      Reg Wilson is a bit of a legend in Australian detecting circles and has kept a comprehensive photo collection of his finds over 4 or 5 decades. Now everyone likes gold images and stories -  and there are plenty here!  I've been offered existing topics to post on, but I believe the topic deserves its own thread to do it full justice. All images are those of Reg Wilson unless otherwise attributed.
      The album consists of hundreds of photographs of not only gold, but many gold detecting industry characters, some of whom are no longer with us, but who all contributed in their own unique ways to the great gold chase we still enjoy today. Firstly, a bit of background.
      Reg first shot to international fame with the finding of this 98 ounce piece which he named the "Orange Roughie" in 1987, decades later to be fraudulently rebirthed as the "Washington Nugget"
      By no means his first find, Reg was already a successful detector operator and at the time was testing a prototype GT 16000 for Minelab's wizz kid engineer Bruce Candy:

      Photo: Australian Sun Herald
      L to R:  Bruce Candy, the late Doug Robertson, Ian Jacques, Reg, John Hider Smith.

      Reg recalled: "The man standing next to Bruce Candy is the late Doug Robertson, who with his brother Bruce worked the aluvials below the famous and fabulously rich Matrix reef at McIntyres. They had an old Matilda tank with a blade attached to clear Mallee scrub. Between them they had a wealth of knowledge of the northern Victorian gold fields.
      (Doug's name may have been Robinson. Memory is a bit foggy)" Ian, Reg and John were prototype SD 2000 testers in Victoria, AU and were collectively known as the "Beagle Boys" a name bestowed upon them by Dave Chappel, the publican of the Railway Hotel Dunolly. On any Friday night huge nuggets, some weighing well over a hundred ounces could be seen displayed on the bar.
      120oz from Longbush. Found all on its own, finder anonymous:

      The playing cards and US currency indicate that the nugget has just been purchased by the late "Rattlesnake" John Fickett, a US gold buyer who bought many of the big pieces back then:

      Ian Jacques and Reg with 44 oz 1989:

      Ian Jacques with his SD 2000 prototype late 80's.
      Real prospectors don't use bungees  

      All for now, but at least we've made a start - - -
       
    • By Chase Goldman
      This has been picked up in the news lately by several outlets.  Great story.  Silver is great and all but I am more interested in the fact that the one of the detectorist is rocking the Equinox mounted on an "S" shaft and it looks pretty cool.  So, just thought I would start up the ol' S-Shaft/Straight Shaft debate again.  Apparently, the only conclusion you can come to is that the S shaft is better for finding silver hordes.  
      https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7413021/Seven-detectorists-stumbled-5m-ancient-coins-Somerset-field-JILL-FOSTER-joins-them.html

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