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Gerry in Idaho

Lets See Your Favorite Non Nugget Finds With Gold Detector

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Gerry

Years ago when they first started wiring homes the wire didn’t have insulation on it .The wiring came in the attic and a hole was drilled the same size as the small end of that tube you got. The big rounded end was to keep it from sliding through the hole that was drilled. The wire past through the tube and you had to do the same for the other wire. Both wires went to other insulators but they were made with a small hole in the center for a nail so you could nail them anywhere you wanted. The wire that came down to the plug did have a form of insulation but nothing like what we have today.

This is just to let you know those belly studs can get you in big trouble. I found one some years ago and like everything else I found I came home with it. My wife wasn’t too happy with me and I told her if I found another I wouldn’t bring it home. I’m not sure but I think the reason she was mad because it was still attached.

A guy can’t win for losing!

Chuck

PS Sorry no picture eyes swollen so bad can’t see to take it.Forgot about bring another home!

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Found this copper socket point in the rafters of a old homestead on one of the ranches a few years ago the house was going to be burned down so i went through the place using my pin pointer checking all the likely spots for anything good found a few coins and such but this copper arrowhead was the best find .

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Gerry, do you consider the Fisher Gold Bug Pro a "gold detector"?  I've always thought of it as an all-around, although not in the same class as the White's MXT or Fisher F75.  The Fisher F19 (and twin sister Teknetics G2+) are basically the GB-Pro and Tek G2 with just a couple added features, and they are sold as coin/relic detectors.  Even the Gold Bug DP (just the Pro with a larger coil) is marketed as a relic machine.  Of course I'm not telling you anything you didn't know many years ago.

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15 hours ago, GB_Amateur said:

Gerry, do you consider the Fisher Gold Bug Pro a "gold detector"?  I've always thought of it as an all-around, although not in the same class as the White's MXT or Fisher F75.  The Fisher F19 (and twin sister Teknetics G2+) are basically the GB-Pro and Tek G2 with just a couple added features, and they are sold as coin/relic detectors.  Even the Gold Bug DP (just the Pro with a larger coil) is marketed as a relic machine.  Of course I'm not telling you anything you didn't know many years ago.

GB_Amateur,  I classify the newer version Gold Bug and the Gold Bug-Pro as true Multi Purpose detectors.  I put the MXT series and F75 in the same category too.  To me, it is a detector with medium kHz on the teens and having an adjustable Discriminator capable of rejecting ferrous and nonferrous targets.  When I tested the 1st prototypes of the Gold Bug I was very impressed with its sensitivity to small pickers (see photo).  Then when the GB-Pro came out and I was able to get my hands on the larger coil, I was very happy with the performance. The GB & GB Pro were priced right at the time (less than many others), but performed well.  I could take 1 detector on a trip in the mountains and use it for both gold and coin/relics.

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some really nice finds there Gerry.  The specimens on the GBP look like potatoes 🙂

 

 

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Phrunt, if i may ask a question a little off topic.   If i wanted to search purely for gold coins with the nox, and used the high frequency only, is there a way with a little discrimination that i could only detect gold and nothing else?

 

Thanks.

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Hi Andy, in my option not really, gold has such a big range, anything from -4 up over 20 on the VDI.  A lot of other stuff fall into those numbers.  In NZ we have modern gold coins (not real gold) that always hit as 21/22 on the VDI without fail, it's easy to block out everything and just get those coins but for real gold the VDI numbers seem to creep up higher the bigger the object is and there would be other variables too changing the VDI.  Unless there was one particular coin you were after and had one to see what it's VDI comes up as you could target that one coin.

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Yet another off topic, sorry Gerry, comment to the above couple of posts. While I am a 100% natural gold nugget detectorist & don't rely on discrimination or pay too much attention to VDI's on my EQ 800 chasing natural in ground gold nuggets/pickers/ fly poop :biggrin:. Just dig it all. The VDI's are influenced greatly by the size of the gold & how close it is to the coil. A piece on the very fringe of detection can either read nothing on the VDI's & just a very slight crackle in the threshold, or throw the VDI's all over the place. From minuses to way up in the positives. Settling down more as you get the coil closer to it. As it is only tiny gold I find with the EQ 800 for example, as my PI's & the Zed have done a grand job of getting everything else. The small/tiny bits, once the detector gets a good lock on them are always a solid +2 to +4 on the VDI's. Same to with bloody lead. Shotgun pellets 🤬 The VDI's increasing with the size of the gold.

There would be a big difference, I imagine, in the VDI's on natural in ground gold &  man made, purified gold coins. Any coins actually. The natural in ground gold nuggets are always mixed with any % of other impurities, like silver, copper, iron stone etc & so will have an effect on VDI's as it struggles to identify the metallic "mix". The VDI's would also be influenced by the size of the gold nugget. Where as a man made gold coin will be refined to a certain purity & size. Gold Sovereigns for example are 22 carat, & the VDI,s would then be influenced slightly by the size of a full sovereign, being about 8 grams & 22mm in diameter & fatter than a half sov which is about 4 grams & 19mm in diameter. So half the weight of a full sov. Then the coin could be laying in the ground in many different ways as to the footprint it gives the detector to see. Same as a natural gold nugget. This also affecting the signal sound & VDI's 

Coins are made of a known metal mix & size & weight. This is why coin detectors can be calibrated to tell you what coin you have found. Unlike natural gold nuggets out in mother nature. I don't believe, in my lifetime anyway, that there will ever be a detector made that will tell you 100% that your signal is gold only. Being that gold is never 100% gold, even when refined. Hence .999 pure. Never 100%. Gold rings, depending on their purity. 22, 18, 14, 9 carat are all mixed with a combination of different % of silver & or copper to give strength & colour will mess with VDI's. The detector is going to see both the gold & these other metals & so read slightly different. The day may come when detectors can tell you the % of mixed metals individually. But then the VDI's will probably tell you that any way depending on what carat ring you have found. Only being influenced slightly by the size of the ring. Sorry...that went off on a bit of a tangent. :rolleyes:

I may stand to be corrected. Not being a coin detectorist.

Getting back on topic. I don't know if I have a favourite non gold find while gold detecting but do have some unusual & unexpected finds out there. Which probably deserves its own thread. I will work on it. 

Good luck out there

JW :smile:        

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