Jump to content

Lets See Your Favorite Non Nugget Finds With Gold Detector


Recommended Posts

There is where years of experience kicks in Andy, kiwijw gave you a much better answer than I did ?

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Still no Yukon gold. But I like finding lead and copper too. Not Aluminum, unless it is campfire beer can aluminum lol

20180523_195241.jpg

  • Haha 2
  • Confused 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Bryce said:

Still no Yukon gold. But I like finding lead and copper too. Not Aluminum, unless it is campfire beer can aluminum lol

20180523_195241.jpg

That's your favourite non nugget find?? :blink: Gezzzz...that's a bit sad.  :biggrin:

JW :smile:

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Great input chaps.  All great advice, and i do mean all of it.  This forum is a wealth of detecting knowledge.

Always learn something new on here, much appreciated.

 

 

Andy.

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, Andy2640 said:

Great input chaps.  All great advice, and i do mean all of it.  This forum is a wealth of detecting knowledge.

Always learn something new on here, much appreciated.

 

 

Andy.

There must be something in this forum Andy. You are from the UK. I am in New Zealand & there are a handfull of Aussies as well & this is an American forum. She is a beaut for sure. Great bunch of guys & gals on here that know there stuff & are only too willing to share. I love it.

Good luck out there

JW :smile:

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Spot on mate. An international gang of decent, passionate , knowledgeable and interesting detectorists so we are, and I agree fully ... we have a great forum here, i'm enjoying it immensely. 

Thanks for the luck JW,  I'm going out sweeping in about 3 hours, hitting a spot that has brought out 8 silvers so far, so your luck is appreciated!

As a horrible fast food chain would say ...." I'm Loving it" ? 

 

Andy.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Andy,  Both Phrunt and JW are correct.  There are so many variables to consider for each of the different gold coins.  Now with that said, I have witnessed and even successfully accomplished some fine tuning and Discrimination Setups for certain detectors to find desired targets.  But I want you to know "it is not 100% guaranteed".

When I was younger and eager to babysit a group of detectorists for a week or 2, I used to take groups to England around the Colchester area.  We used to keep in contact with all the folks who hunted there and after some time there would be certain fields that gave up a specific type of gold coin.  For example,  gold Morini was pretty common on one field and some guys would only dig targets that fell in the Morini range.  Yes you missed many other potential finds, but you upped your chances at finding the small elusive Morini (1/4 Stater).

On another field, there were quite a few Celtic 1/2 Staters recovered from the different groups, so a few of the hard core hunters would set their DISC pattern to reject all targets that fall outside of that range.  Realize depth and a few other factors call dictate and change the signature of that target.

As for gold rings, I have found more than my share, but I play the odds.  For example, I did a video on the Minelab X-terra 705 a few years back and took approx 50 gold rings swinging each across the coil to get the signature of them. I placed each ring in line with all the other rings that gave the same digital readout.  What I found was certain #'s had a higher % change of being a gold ring. The lower % chance #'s  and the #'s that I had no gold rings reading, I simply rejected.  There were some many comments across the world from folks who became more successful at finding gold rings.  You must realize there is always an exception to the rule.  My use of the X-705 to find rings in schools/parks was for recently lost rings near the surface.  

With my Equinox, I have recovered 23 gold or platinum rings so far.  As I get around 50, then I'll be able to see a pattern of the most #'s pertaining to a gold ring near the surface.  Then I can play the odds and start rejecting the #'s that do not resemble.

You being in UK, there are literally a 100+ different kinds of gold coins in the fields.  If you know of such a field that a hoard of a certain type of gold coin was recovered, then you can dial that coin in with a disc pattern to help.  My opinion only - As for the kHz Setting, I would not recommend the higher 40 kHz, as it is too high and you'll be hitting every tiny bit of metal and lead.  20 kHz would be much easier on the ears and ads a little more depth too.

Many folks do this and they don't miss much. "Just Dig It All"...but I'll play the odds when trying to find a certain target or hunt a particular site I know the history behind.

Good luck to you and be sure to share your 1st gold photo and story with us.

Here is the video I did on the X-705 and my findings.

 

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Gerry,

Your comments make a lot of sense to me.  And you are so right ... in that all different gold coins, rings etc ... will all ping differently based on the sheer numbers and varieties out there.   A lot of quality info there, so really appreciate your input!

From now on, ill eat my spinach and get digging pretty much everything that sounds/looks/feels good ?  

Really appreciate your post Gerry, it confirmed what ive thought myself in moments of deep "pre-detecting" contemplation.   Its always nice to get confirmation of ones own thoughts and insight from someone who's more knowledgeable.

Oh and indeed, photo's will follow (shortly) of those pesky sovereigns ? 

Cheers Buddy!

Andy.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Was out at Hatcher Pass recreational mining area detecting with my SDC2300 in between running my sluice box. I found found this bullet in a stream. Of course I found a bunch of different kind of shell casings but I thought it was pretty cool so I thought I would share. I didn’t find much gold and still have to sort out all the black sand, nothing worth even mentioning since it was just a few specs and flakes.

E3F70499-F7D1-4380-A1BC-6BD21D683DE0.jpeg

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Similar Content

    • By Steve Herschbach
      Fourteen year old Tana Clymer found the 3.85 carat yellow diamond last October at a crater of the Diamonds park in Arkansas. Crater of the Diamonds is the only diamond-producing site in the world that's open to the public, according to the park. Tara plans on using the proceeds from the sale of the jellybean size diamond to help pay for college.

      http://www.weather.com/tv/tvshows/prospectors/teen-sells-diamond-found-arkansas-20140411

      AP Photo
    • By mn90403
      https://www.lovecpokladu.cz/home/fanky-depot-8203
    • By GhostLands
      "A Dream Come True" European treasure hunter unearths hoard of 400-700 year-old hammered coins Chicago, IL (September 1, 2020) - From the time one picks up his or her first metal detector, detectorists dream of making “the big find”. Big means different things to different people. Some aspire to find a huge gold nugget in a dry creek bed. Others hope to discover an unhunted Civil War battlefield full of bullets, buttons, and buckles. For some, a recovered diamond ring would make them happy. Others dream of finding a posthole bank containing a can of gold and silver coins. Who knows exactly what sort of “big find” tops one particular European detectorist’s list. For this man, who wishes to be referred to in this article simply as Fabio, one of his recent discoveries must certainly come close. The European countryside is a special place where thousands of years’ of historical items have been lost, just waiting to be found. Some people – like Fabio – are fortunate to be able to search there on a daily basis. In February of 2020, Fabio and one of his friends were detecting one of the many large farm areas on which they have permission to hunt. They had been searching all day. “It was raining like crazy. We were very exhausted from walking many miles with no good signals,” recalls Fabio, who had decided to return to the car to escape a downpour when his friend suddenly began frantically yelling that he had just found several billon (a silver/copper alloy) hammered coins. “I rushed back and turned on my Minelab VANQUISH detector equipped with the 12” coil and started swinging,” says Fabio. “The area had many pottery fragments and the soil was dark and heavily mineralized, but the VANQUISH easily overcame the difficult conditions.” Fabio began getting good signals. “One coin, two coins, three coins… 11 coins! Coins all over the place!” he recalls. Imagine his excitement. The coins the two men were finding were hammered coins, mostly from the 14th century. For those who may be unfamiliar with hammered coins, Fabio explains: “The dies for both sides of a coin were made from hard metal, then a softer coin blank was centered between them and then struck with a hammer to leave the coin impression on both sides.” A half-hour later, the detectors were still sounding off, but both men were cold, wet, and exhausted from digging through 6-to-8 inches of muddy topsoil. They marked the spot and made plans to return the next day under better hunting conditions. The next day found Fabio and his friend back in the field, full of renewed energy and excitement. They had brought along an additional friend to share in the fun. Fabio started the day with the eight-inch coil on his Minelab VANQUISH and planned to change to the 12-inch coil later in the day to reach the deeper coins. He began detecting over an area previously covered by his friend the day before, and quickly began getting signals which had been missed. The machine his friend was using was not as sensitive or able to detect the deeper coins Fabio was finding with his VANQUISH – even with the eight-inch coil. A short time later, Fabio heard one of his friends shouting. He had uncovered a rare hammered coin with a King Ferdinand bust, and all three men rushed to celebrate the find. Soon, Fabio had a signal reading higher than what he had been getting with the small, thin hammered coins. It was a beautiful coin similar to the one his detecting friend had just found. In his excitement, however, Fabio failed to recheck his hole. When his second friend went over that area again a short time later, he detected and uncovered another rare hammered coin Fabio had missed. But Fabio didn’t mind. “At the end of the day, we were completely exhausted but also extremely happy!” he says. “Without a doubt, it was one of the happiest days of our lives!” Fabio and his two friends returned the following weekend to resume their hunt. This time, he took his Minelab EQUINOX 800 to see how it would perform on the site. It did great, as he continued to discover new coins. “I found 66 coins with the VANQUISH, and 43 more when I went back with the EQUINOX and its stock coil,” he says. “As the finds started slowing down, I switched to the EQUINOX with the 15-inch coil and found 14 more!” Fabio continued changing coils and his Minelab machines and hunted for a total of five days. All told, his extraordinary discovery totaled an astonishing 128 coins. The area the men were hunting was a farm field close to a river. The total area they had permission to hunt on was about one square mile, and the specific area where the coins were found was around five acres. But why were they there? The trio had discovered a lot of pottery pieces in the ground, so perhaps a large pot – or several pots – had been filled with coins and buried. Agricultural activity could have easily scattered the coins. And while that may be the most logical explanation, Fabio has other theories as well. “It could have been from a shipwreck since the nearby river flooded into this area on occasion,” he says. “Or it might have been from a military encampment from that period.” Later in their search, the men also found some 16th and 17th century coins, further complicating the mystery surrounding this fabulous hoard. While Fabio, 31, is a passionate detectorist, he hasn’t been treasure hunting for very long. When he was young, he enjoyed going to the beach and searching for fossils. Three years ago, he was invited to a metal-detecting group event and looked at all the exciting finds people were discovering. Shortly thereafter, he bought his first detector. Amazingly, he found a Spanish reale on just his second day detecting. The excitement took over, and he has been at the game ever since. Fabio has experience with several different makes and models of detectors, but chooses to hunt today with Minelab’s CTX 3030, EQUINOX and VANQUISH models, citing Minelab’s Multi-IQ simultaneous frequency technology as a game-changer for both beginning and experienced detectorists. “Multi-IQ means you can search with multiple frequencies at the same time and find any metal in any soil conditions,” he says. “It’s a great feature that helps people make more finds.” Fabio is still researching the value of the coins and doesn’t yet know what he will ultimately do with this find of a lifetime. “The value of this find in monetary terms is unknown at this time,” he says. “But in terms of personal satisfaction in obtaining a find of this age and quantity, it is priceless!” And that’s what this story is all about – the fun, the excitement, and the dreams that come with detecting – along with showing beginning or would-be detectorists what they can do with a well-chosen and well-engineered metal detector like the Minelab VANQUISH. It’s an inexpensive, easy-to-use-and-understand machine that can make dreams come true.
      http://www.icontact-archive.com/archive?c=321494&f=96178&s=102669&m=860447&t=90b4cabee533b419eaf03e6b61c7e438407efa9c7bbadf30b31791b66b8173b7






    • By DOP
      Hi everybody- another beautiful weekend in the PNW and some great relics and history uncovered. Check out our expedition! 
       
       
    • By phrunt
      This was on TV in New Zealand tonight about a guy finding a gold sovereign with his Nox worth about $50,000 NZD, about 33,000 USD.  It was an Aussie minted coin.
      The video even has what I see as a typical Garrett user in it 😛  Just kiddin'
    • By devilsrenegade
      Went back to an old poured concrete foundation in the woods which is a popular Elk hunters campsite. This is a site where I found my first seated dime a few years ago. The area is loaded with modern trash and lot's of iron nails and old tin buried near the foundation walls. I brought my Teknetics G2 with both the 5" and 11"x7" coil as I also intended to try some nugget detecting near the creek. I didn't find any nuggets but managed to pull 2 nice V nickels, 1890 and 1883. I set the detector in disc mode after ground balancing at 83. The ground here is very mineralized. I then set the tone break at 40 to separate ferrous from nonferrous and started swinging . I dug everything that hit in the ferrous range and all one-way signals that sounded good one direction but like iron the other. I also managed a few relics and a small pile of trash. 
       
       









×
×
  • Create New...