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afreakofnature

Advanced Metal Detecting Prospecting Books - Tell Me Your Favorite!

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Last week I responded to a topic on Jim Straight's bibliography and got thinking that I would like to ask everyone out there what there favorite "Advanced" books are.  I am not talking about the book that tells you to keep your coil level and low, or dig here books.  Books that give methods, techniques, or other tips that you don't really know about until you go out and learn them on your own.  (An example for me would be that I never really knew about raking an area and removing a layer of dirt to get even deeper, but after reading that it completely makes sense.)  Other books that would be good are geology, geomorphology and hyrdogeology for "detectable nuggets."  Sure we can use USGS and State GeoSurveys to find areas that have gold, but a lot of gold out there is fine and undetectable, I want books (pubs) on the formation of nuggety gold!.  I haven't really seen or been able to research any info like that.  I do have the basic grasp, but I love to read in the offseason and learn as much as I can to help on the hunt, plus I am ready for some advanced reading.  Kind of sucks to skim through the first half of a book because it only talks about how to swing a detector :biggrin:

Tell me your Favorites!  Lets make a list!

So far on the list:

  • Fists Full of Gold:  A complete Guide to the Art of Prospecting: How You Can Find Gold in the Mountains and Deserts.  (Chris Ralph)
  • The Complete unabridged Zip Zip  (Larry Sallee)
  • DFX Gold Methods: Finding Gold Jewelry with the Whites DFX E series TM Metal Detector. (Clive Clynick)
  • Treasure Hunting Manual Vol 7 (Von Mueller)
  • Tom Dankowski's 5th Edition Fisher Intelligence booklet.  (Tom Dankowski)
  • CoinShooting I, II, and III.  (Glenn Carson)
  • Advanced Nuggetshooting - How to Prospect for Gold with a Metal Detector.
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Some of my favorites....

  • Fists Full of Gold:  A complete Guide to the Art of Prospecting: How You Can Find Gold in the Mountains and Deserts.  (Chris Ralph)
  • The Complete unabridged Zip Zip  (larry Sallee)
  • DFX Gold Methods: Finding Gold Jewelry with the Whites DFX E series TM Metal Detector. (Clive Clynick)
  • Treasure Hunting Manual Vol 7 (Von Mueller)
  • Tom Dankowski's 5th Edition Fisher Intelligence booklet.  (Tom Dankowski)
  • CoinShooting 1, II, and III.  (Glenn Carson)

I have many more but those stand out off the top of my head.  

I like the Glenn Carson Coinshooting books because he makes you think about your desired targets.

Anyway....a quick 'off the cuff' list.

Don't forget the DVD's.   There are some really good DVDs out there.  

Mike

 

 

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Thanks Mike, I am going to add what people put down to the first post for the list.  

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Nothing to do with detecting for gold, however everyone should read "Bacon and beans from a gold pan." It's a classic. 

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