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29 minutes ago, Steve Herschbach said:

My super dredge location reached with great effort was proving to be not much better than the previous site

Dontcha hate it when well thought out theory fails to produce? - - happens a lot in this game.

For me, part of the fun of it. :biggrin:

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Great photos Steve and thanks.

My Aunt and Uncle were chosen as participants in the Matanuska Valley Colony experiment.  My dad who was single at the time followed later by riding the rails to Seattle and taking the boat to Anchorage.  When the War broke out he went to Seattle to enlist, returning back home to Michigan when the War in the Pacific ended.

I heard many stories about the Matanuska valley area growing up as a child and have always wished I could have experienced it during that time.  Definitely need to put getting up there on the bucket list.

 

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You bugger....how could you leave it there....I am now hanging off the end of my chair. :laugh: But I know that was your plan.....:biggrin:

I can but imagine your thoughts & emotions going through you on this three week "adventure" & trips down memory lane considering this could well be, like you said, your last time in there. I myself have a soft spot for these type moments in my life & have very vivid memories & photographic mind shots of these different moments through my life that are etched in my mind forever. Like time has stood still. I can still see them now as clear as I stood thinking of that moment back when.

Look forward to your conclusion.

Best of luck out there

JW :smile:  

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Your pictures are making me homesick Steve. But don't stop, this has been a great story. I just posted a link to it on my forums, so you should have more folks reading your story. 

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2 hours ago, Jim_Alaska said:

Your pictures are making me homesick Steve

Breathtakingly spectacular country of origin Jim, Love to see it one day. Would be best prospected by younger legs than mine though :sad:

Steve - -  waiting impatiently - - :biggrin:

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Love the Hulk Steve. What is the elevation of the strip?

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10 hours ago, jrbeatty said:

Breathtakingly spectacular country of origin Jim, Love to see it one day. Would be best prospected by younger legs than mine though :sad:

Steve - -  waiting impatiently - - :biggrin:

I know what you mean JR. My legs have given out also. Mine is not just from age, but also have developed Neuropathy, which means I have no feeling in my legs and feet. It makes you extremely unsteady, which makes it dangerous on uneven ground.

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