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tboykin

Goldmaster 24k XGB Explained

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We've been getting a lot of questions about the new XGB on our Goldmaster 24k and why it's an improvement over legacy ground tracking systems that you find on other machines. So here's some info (see attached PDF).

The short answer is that lowering the gain, for example in an Auto-Gain system, is only a way to mask the problem of difficult ground. The real issue is dealing with variances, hot rocks, etc.

In the coming weeks I can shoot a video showing how this provides a benefit to users, but their successes in the field speak for themselves.

WhitesPaper_XGB.pdf

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32 minutes ago, tboykin said:

We've been getting a lot of questions about the new XGB on our Goldmaster 24k and why it's an improvement over legacy ground tracking systems that you find on other machines. So here's some info (see attached PDF).

The short answer is that lowering the gain, for example in an Auto-Gain system, is only a way to mask the problem of difficult ground. The real issue is dealing with variances, hot rocks, etc.

In the coming weeks I can shoot a video showing how this provides a benefit to users, but their successes in the field speak for themselves.

WhitesPaper_XGB.pdf

Sounds Interesting, in that White's Paper 🙂 you mention all the top VLF's and high end PI's struggled in this area in Brazil due to the mineralisation. You didn't say directly the 24k worked well there but were possibly indicating it will. Does that mean the 24k will work as well as if not better than a PI in Australia with their mineralisation due to this XGB or just better than existing VLFs?

It seems all VLF manufacturers lately are talking about how well their VLF's handle high mineralisation, it seems to be the big challenge at the moment to overcome so if XGB is the solution that's pretty cool.  I'm not trying to be picky or anything, I'm just interested in new technologies and advancements.

We don't have much in the way of mineralisation here in NZ so I don't overly know what it's like to deal with thankfully.  Looking forward to your video! 

 

 

 

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18 minutes ago, phrunt said:

Sounds Interesting, in that White's Paper 🙂 you mention all the top VLF's and high end PI's struggled in this area in Brazil due to the mineralisation. You didn't say directly the 24k worked well there but were possibly indicating it will. Does that mean the 24k will work as well as if not better than a PI in Australia with their mineralisation due to this XGB or just better than existing VLFs?

The 24k performed better than the other VLF machines we tested in Brazil. But most P.I.s will outperform VLF's in mineralized ground. There is no way around that, it's just physics.

In some areas the mineralization so extreme that even P.I.s struggle. Australia, Brazil, Africa, and parts of Southern Oregon are a few that come to mind. I would say it's a good plan to have both a hot P.I. and a hot VLF for maximum gold recovery.

You are very lucky to have soil so mild where you live.

Do you know why New Zealand has the fastest race horses in the world?

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8 minutes ago, tboykin said:

The 24k performed better than the other VLF machines we tested in Brazil. But most P.I.s will outperform VLF's in mineralized ground. There is no way around that, it's just physics.

In some areas the mineralization so extreme that even P.I.s struggle. Australia, Brazil, Africa, and parts of Southern Oregon are a few that come to mind. I would say it's a good plan to have both a hot P.I. and a hot VLF for maximum gold recovery.

You are very lucky to have soil so mild where you live.

Do you know why New Zealand has the fastest race horses in the world?

Thanks for clearing that up, the 24k sounds very good, I tried to buy one but the dealer here in NZ is not able to help there so I had to cancel that idea.  I was very interested in running a VLF with a concentric coil and wanted something more modern than a GB2 with auto ground balance so the 24k seemed perfect for my wishes, I'll just follow its users I guess and see how it goes in the long run but it's all looking very good.

I have no idea about the race horses although I should as my Dad was heavily involved in them doing the drug testing and some other things I don't understand relating to judging who wins the race or something along those lines.  I never paid much attention to it 🙂  I often see guys out on the farms driving along on a Quad Bike with the horse running behind it so I guess they're teaching them how to run fast, and they run them up the steep hills behind the bike, so maybe all the mountainous terrain is giving the horses good exercise :laugh: I know it sure gives me a workout prospecting.  

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Phar Lap  , a wonderful movie about an amazing horse.
Nothing to do with detectors but mighty interesting !
AND tboykin, Please keep up the good work I am always looking for more info on the new 24K.
Appreciate your contributions.

 

 

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So the XGB is basically the ATMAX's ground balance window feature automated into the  24K's ground tracking feature.   That is cool as that is a good feature on the Garrett.   

Can you set it into the iron target range?  Anotherwords can the ground balance window be set to where iron is included?  Kind of like when you run your ground balance point all the way to 0 and move the iron into the ground balance hole that develops there.

Or is the XGB setting window fixed to the ground only section of the phase response?

it would be cool if you could throw a little iron bias into the mix.

HH
Mike 

 

 

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On 9/19/2018 at 3:25 PM, tboykin said:

The 24k performed better than the other VLF machines we tested in Brazil. But most P.I.s will outperform VLF's in mineralized ground. There is no way around that, it's just physics.

. . . 

Was the GM1000 one of the machines you tested the 24K against?  I am trying to figure out how the 24K's ground tracking system compares to that of the GM1000, which users seem to really like.

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