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100 Khz Detectors Even Better?

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9 hours ago, Buzzard said:

If I remember right the Gold Bug 2 is 71khz and that is the highest of any detectors that I know of.

There have been higher, like the Compass Yukon at 100Khz.

https://www.kellycodetectors.com/catalog/demo-yukon-99b

Compass Yukon-B discovers gold, silver, copper, coins-on land, under dirt, snow, rocks, cement, in shallow water. Yukon-B is a T-R balance circuit incorporating both transistors and integrated circuits. Operating at 100kHz-modulated with 250Hz .Batteries commonly available 9v and 1.5 V penlight. 40-50 hours on 9v, 50-60 hours on 1.5v. Coil is waterproof high impact ABS plastic. White for heat reflection. Audio is distinctive tonal quality for optimum ear pick-up Uncomplicated and easy to set up and tune with only 3 knobs; power on/off volume, metal and/or mineral tuning, and indicating light on/off.

s-l1600.jpg

I wish I had one of these! So cool, so very cool! 

 

 

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Hi Simon,

The big difference is these early 100 kHz T/R models are "BGB" or "Before Ground Balancing" and they put out nowhere near the power of modern detectors. They had to be operated at a specific height over the ground, and any variation either caused a false signal, or detuned the detector. They were extremely difficult to run in mineralized ground due to this. Depth on coin type targets is just a few inches. Sensitivity to small gold was non-existent. They were also prone to tuning drift and so required constant threshold updating.

The old T/R (Transmitter/Receiver) models did have the ability to largely ignore nails since nails were treated the same as ground. There are some cult owners that have them due to this. I had a Compass Yukon up until a few years ago, but that ability is overrated and no match for modern trash sifters like the Deus. Long story short interesting stuff but dinosaurs by today's standards.

My first detector, the White's Coinmaster IV was similar but Compass was generally acknowledged as having taken that particular old tech as far as it could go.

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So my big question is that people love the GB2 and it's 71khz frequency. Competitors of it haven't gone near the 71khz mark, staying below it by a reasonable margin, is there a reason for this happening and them at least not matching it? 

Frequency seems a good marketing tool more than anything in these higher frequencies so why hasn't Fisher come out with a Gold Bug 3 with 100khz to make a bold statement?

 

 

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There is a diminishing point of returns above 40 kHz. 100 kHz would basically add instability and get even less depth than a Gold Bug 2 (not a depth demon) while only enhancing the ability to detect bits so tiny you need a microscope to see them. White's went with 48/50 kHz and Minelab went with 45 kHz for this very reason. Target id spread also continues to compress the higher you go, making ferrous/non-ferrous discrimination more challenging.

If you have the hankering get the Deus HF elliptical coil which tops out at 81 kHz. Which kind of blows a hole in the original premise of the post - the Gold Bug 2 is not the highest frequency nugget machine available. Yet I would put the Gold Bug 2 up against the Deus HF because the Bug sports a 6" elliptical concentric coil that is half the magic. Frequency is not everything. Transmit power, coil type, and above all the efficiency of the ground balance circuit and more all have a role to play.

Buying a detector based solely on operating kHz makes as much sense these days as buying a computer based solely on processor speed. Even less sense when you consider what is going on with multifrequency.

As always just my not so humble opinions....

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The Macro Gold Racer at 56 kHz is a nice running detector.. Great for gold but I actually did very well Coin hunting with it too.

Bryan

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When it comes to the tradeoffs in frequency vs size/depth for gold machines, that is an area where it seems like a multi-frequency gold machine (like the Nox but maybe with the frequencies shifted a bit higher to catch the really small stuff) should shine.

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If you master the Equinox with 6” coil it will outperform most if not all single frequency units. There is no need to “shift” anything higher - it already does the job on the really small stuff. The cumulative effect of several frequencies working in tandem does appear to exceed the punch that can be delivered by any one single frequency. People scoff at the “obsolete” statement made by Minelab but I don’t see any point in going back to single frequency myself. That’s just me however - your mileage may vary. The main problem with the Equinox is that it is a heavier lift to master the machine than the single frequency units due to the complex interplay between the various settings. A future dedicated nugget detector based on Multi-IQ will no doubt be simpler to operate and feature stock coils made specifically for nugget detecting.

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18 hours ago, Steve Herschbach said:

If you master the Equinox with 6” coil it will outperform most if not all single frequency units. There is no need to “shift” anything higher - it already does the job on the really small stuff. The cumulative effect of several frequencies working in tandem does appear to exceed the punch that can be delivered by any one single frequency. People scoff at the “obsolete” statement made by Minelab but I don’t see any point in going back to single frequency myself. That’s just me however - your mileage may vary. The main problem with the Equinox is that it is a heavier lift to master the machine than the single frequency units due to the complex interplay between the various settings. A future dedicated nugget detector based on Multi-IQ will no doubt be simpler to operate and feature stock coils made specifically for nugget detecting.

Good to hear, since I already have the Nox 600 and also the 6" coil. (I'm thinking seriously about adding the 800, which would also give me the gold modes, although I understand Park 2 and Field 2 do a reasonable job on gold.) With effective nugget hunting added to its resume, the Equinox certainly does come closer to doing everything than any other VLF machine. I do wonder, though, whether the tracking systems of some of the dedicated gold machines might give them an edge, at least in convenience.  For example, the Gold Monster 1000's success is apparently due in part to its aggressive (and effective) tracking system.  

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I still have a Gold Monster, Gold Kruzer, and Goldmaster 24K on hand. There is something nice about that old fashioned all metal mode I will always like. They are all capable units so it really depends on just what you desire in a detector. I can be successful with any of them and what works best in one location may not have "an edge" at another location. All ground and all gold is not the same, so in general I find pursuing such microscopic edges to be a waste of time. My skill as a prospector vastly outweighs such small differences that exist between most VLF models.

If you seek power, then get a GPZ 7000 and be done with it. Once you use one of those all VLF units pale by comparison and then you would see why I don't worry much about the fine details on what are in reality second tier models anyway.

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