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Was detecting in Norfolk Oct 2018, 10 days. Fantastic time, also loved england and english folk, the countryside is like a dream with 14th century churches scattered about. I was surprised that culinary was not bad, in fact, pretty good, even the highway stops touted the sandwiches and such were real food, and ingredients were all simple food names, no modified extract hydrolyzed goop. It seems a more civilized, caring society. Your recounting really evoked tremendous memories for me. Our English guides were awesome, incredibly knowledgeable. My buddy scored a fat gold blob. I wasn't surprised really, he rarely leaves the beach without gold. We both used Nox's, my buddy's was brand new he'd never used it before the trip, but he did tremendous, finding six, seven, eight silver hammered and milled coins pretty much every day, so much so that he was being asked about his Nox settings...he told them truthfully that he just turned it on and swung the coil. I had told him how to noise cancel, set the sensitivity, and switch programs, and I don't think he knew more than that. Gary Sabisch was on our trip; at the time he was working on his upcoming book on the Equinox, which has, since its recent released, garnered much praise. Gary didn't say a word, but I don't think he believed my pal for a moment. I knew it was essentially true. For instance, he used his waterproof beach headphones in those english fields. I mean, who else would do that? My pal is really a savant, an amazing natural detectorist, though I will accede that I did a minimal amount of coaching over the years, as I did in giving him the barest of basics on the Nox before our trip. Problem is, he then out produces me 3 to 1.

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Well, the wheels turn slowly, but some progress made. My find is not going to be acquired by the museum, and so now goes to the disclaim stage. The British Museum has to write to the Coroner to ask for an official Disclaim notification, and the find can only be released after 28 days have elapsed since the date of the Coroner’s letter. At some point I have to negotiate a price with the property owner. While I’d love to get the find back I have found enough gold in my life that I’m not going to go crazy over it, so if the property owner thinks it’s worth too much they can pay me for it instead. That’s what keeps the system honest... they can’t ask any more of me than they are willing to pay me.

I would not mind getting it back though, and if so have decided I will have a jeweler friend make it into a ring for me. I could almost do it myself and still may since I used to do a little jewelry work myself. It just needs to be wrapped to fit, and maybe a spot of solder on the inside but I doubt even that is needed.

I will probably never know exactly what this item is. The initial guess was a Celtic votive offering but it’s also been said to possibly be a Roman cloak clasp or earring. The initial report to the museum indicated a possible Early Medieval time frame which coincides more with late Roman occupation. Maybe 1500 years old, maybe older as Celtic would be more like 2200 years. Only a detailed composition analysis of the gold could nail it down better, and the find is not remarkable enough to warrant the expense of that. I’m going with Early Medieval about 1500 years old unless the museum disclaim notice sheds more light on the matter.

herschbach-celtic-votive-offering-2018.jpg

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It's really a once in a life time find when you think about it...I'd go so far as to say it's potentially a family heirloom and it will never mean as much to any one else as it does to you..Here's to hoping you get it back since you are the one that has invested all the time and money go half way around the world and find it in the first place. 

strick

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Just my opinion Steve,  but I would have it documented and keep it unaltered.  It has to be worth far more, historically and financially,  as is than turned into something else. If you really wanted a ring make a replica then alter that.

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I don’t attach much value to “things”. I love the hunt and the finding. I like the stories/memories and therefore the photos if I want to show people items I have found. Which outside of this forum is never, so everything I find is eventually sold or given away. It pays for these trips! :smile: If it’s got real monetary value, like the gold, it’s in the safe deposit box until sold. Keeping something locked away is worthless to me personally. A replica would mean nothing to me. I am not saying that’s all not great for other people but it’s just not me. If I was not married everything I need would fit in a closet as I really don’t like “owning” stuff. By fashioning this into a new wedding ring it would both be useful and have a story. Right now I am wearing a plain 14K band I found on Kauai and this would replace it. Otherwise I’d just sell it. If not that then when I croak my wife or kids are just going to run it all to the nearest pawn shop anyway. Not a lot of sentimental types when it comes to “stuff” around here! :laugh:

On a scale from Hoarder to Zen I am way over on the Zen side of things. Our whole economy would collapse if it consisted of people like me. The only genuine treasures in my life are my family and the few friends that have come and gone over the years. Get me going on my “three little girls” if you want to see my mushy side! Lilly, Eleanor, and Fluffy... ❤️

91BEA942-829D-4CE1-BB38-47ECEB27D937.jpeg

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Yep, I hear ya, I've told my family (wife and 4 daughters) for years that if they somehow disappeared I would just live in a van and be fine.

I'm just saying I would think the find has historical significance. I would try an auction with a good story before anything else. That might turn out to be lucrative if you catch the right bidders. Or if lucky the farmer will value it more than you.

I'm much like you though, the only "things" I value are ones I can directly convert into future adventures, touring bikes, metal detectors, hunting/fishing gear etc.

 

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Adding a couple more twists to an unidentified 2000 year old object so it fits on your finger should not hurt the value...If you get it back I vote ring...

strick

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Steve, I just came across this thread and enjoyed reading both the original post and almost all the other replies.  I did a "barn hunt" back in 2008 with Gerry McMullen and his group.  Like you I did a lot of hunting on my own when everyone dispersed in the fields.  Your post brought back many great memories of Colchester and the history of the area. Although I only found one piece of gold, it was also a coin and a stater dating to 50 - 35BC.  Also, like you, I did manage a return trip with one of the fellows I met in 2008.  And like you it was great to see that Jeff found a large gold coin which in all honesty was much nicer than mine.  He was a very good detectorist who worked hard and deserved every nice find he made.

Suffice it to say, I enjoyed reading this thread and continue to find my way through the whole site in search of more of your stories.  Thanks for all you do for the detecting community.

Gord

Edited by stripes17
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  • 3 months later...

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