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normmcq

Indicators

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Some nice crystals there Norman ? Those are a huge rarity in Otago here in the south Island of New Zealand. I am picking because of the glaciation but also the old hard rock mine dumps just don't have any good crystal material. Unlike from where I came from up north from the Coromandel region where they were a dime a dozen. Spent many a fun time combing over the old hard rock mine dumps gathering up bucket loads. I have only ever found one down here that was worth picking up & putting in my pocket. Now I don't even know where that one has ended up. :rolleyes: I tried finding it to show Simon.

Good luck out there

JW :smile:   

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Nice indicator in the middle?.

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I’ve learned on the areas I hunt the most the bigger the crystals the bigger the gold. 

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Yep....you can't beat finding gold as a good indicator. Probably the best. :laugh: The square cube shape of the pyrites, is that what they call, Devils Dice?

Always love seeing your silver specimens Jim. ?

Good luck out there

JW :smile:

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Norm,

That's a nice collection of "indicators".  Your collection mirrors my 'finds" during the many visits to the foothills of Rye Patch, including the gold. 

Optically clear, fully terminated quartz crystals, plus the Iron Pyrite (AKA Fool's Gold) in their cubic form of, are both prevalent minerals to be found in gold baring areas.  They are just some of the indicators in new areas, much as Norm has indicated.

Happy hunting out there!

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good stuff Norm i like it when i see Limonite on the ground be it in quartz or single crystals like those you are showing.

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