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My UK Trip .... Double Ancient Gold!


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This was a learning experience for Tim and I in another way. I was convinced Minelab would want to work with Tim in securing the exclusive rights to his story and photo. I helped him make contact and was sure we could get some sort of freebie out of Minelab for Tim. I admit I was surprised when we were told that the Minelab advertising budget only allows for this via the Minelab Find of the Month page. This can result in a $250 voucher if a person's story is chosen for Find of the Month. I really thought we could do better than that but apparently not. My apologies Tim for getting your hopes up in that regard but useful information for anyone else making a once in a lifetime find like this. For further reference:

Fisher Metal Detector Finds

Garrett Find of the Month

Minelab Find of the Month

Nokta / Makro Success Stories

Teknetics Metal Detector Finds

White's Metal Detector Finds

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Amazing finds, for sure.  Those Celts seemed to like gold.  I envy detectorists who have access to England's (and Europe's) treasure fields.  I believe certain North American Indian tribes did some work in gold and copper, but it just hasn't resulted in many artifact finds.

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4 hours ago, Gwcracker said:

Will the gold stay in UK after being declaired treasure by the authorities or will you be able to bring it home?

Just making comparisons to what I and friends experienced.

g

I'm pretty new with this whole process as well. ?

But the way I understand it is, that they already infact are considered "treasure", being made of a precious metal and being over 300 years old. If the Museum claims them then a fair market value will be put on them and that amount would be split by the landowner and me. If the Museum disclaims them, then an agreement will be made between the landowner and myself. Either we buy one another out. Or we put them up for auction and split the money.  

 

Steve, feel free to correct me if I'm completely wrong about this. 

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It is a detectorist adventure.. Targets everywhere, buttons, coins, relics but..reality sets in when it's time to label and bag it all up...and tell it all good bye where it is then cherry picked and anything of value is skimmed off the top. What you get is all the base metal coins, modern day relics, the newer stuff, less than 300 or so years old. What is mailed to you after all is said and done is not worth the cost of it's postage.

I did have a good time in England, but I felt like I paid big bux to be a digger for the land owner as well as the fellow that runs the hunt, being as they, not me, were going to wind up in posession of anything of value that I found.

I would equate it to a charter tuna fishing trip, expensive, and all is said and done the charter captain gets the tuna fish and I get the bait.

I do hope it works out for you and you wind up with what you dug!

gw

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1 hour ago, Gwcracker said:

It is a detectorist adventure.. Targets everywhere, buttons, coins, relics but..reality sets in when it's time to label and bag it all up...and tell it all good bye where it is then cherry picked and anything of value is skimmed off the top. What you get is all the base metal coins, modern day relics, the newer stuff, less than 300 or so years old. What is mailed to you after all is said and done is not worth the cost of it's postage.

I did have a good time in England, but I felt like I paid big bux to be a digger for the land owner as well as the fellow that runs the hunt, being as they, not me, were going to wind up in posession of anything of value that I found.

I would equate it to a charter tuna fishing trip, expensive, and all is said and done the charter captain gets the tuna fish and I get the bait.

I do hope it works out for you and you wind up with what you dug!

gw

Nearly all the finders on the trips I have taken have gotten all their finds back though not immediately. There is no cost besides postage involved unless a gold coin or treasure (non-coin over 10% precious metal and over 300 years old) is found. All coins gold or silver go to the finders unless part of a horde. There is certainly is no age cut off at 300 years - that only plays into the definition of treasure and does not apply to 99% of the finds made.

I got every find I made returned to me on my first trip and much of it was over 300 years old and I got all my silver coins back plus my one "treasure" item. Your statement about nothing older than 300 years and only base metal coins being returned is flat out not true.

If you are talking about what you can take home immediately, the rule is 50 years or less, not 300 years. Everything else has to go through the export process, which can take up to a year or more.

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From the OP post..

"ready infact are considered "treasure", being made of a precious metal and being over 300 years old. If the Museum claims them then a fair market value will be put on them and that amount would be split by the landowner and me. If the Museum disclaims them, then an agreement will be made between the landowner and myself. Either we buy one another out. Or we put them up for auction and split the money."

seemed about right as I saw it as well. Not worth the argument but anything considered treasure, with monitary value ain't coming back home unless the finder has deep pockets.

Let's see what the gold egg and ring costs the OP after all is said and done. I guarantee it will not be cheap.

what many fail to see is the stuff we consider rare and worth digging here, the Colonial stuff is considered junk over there... No value to the locals. Like modern coinage is here. They care not if we bring a ton of that stuff home as long as we pay postage.

Some is even used to seed the fields from what I was told by someone that I figured knew what he was talking about.

Would love to go back and hunt but would not go on an organized hunt for someone else to profit from my labor.

gw

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1 hour ago, Gwcracker said:

It is a detectorist adventure.. Targets everywhere, buttons, coins, relics but..reality sets in when it's time to label and bag it all up...and tell it all good bye where it is then cherry picked and anything of value is skimmed off the top. What you get is all the base metal coins, modern day relics, the newer stuff, less than 300 or so years old. What is mailed to you after all is said and done is not worth the cost of it's postage.

I did have a good time in England, but I felt like I paid big bux to be a digger for the land owner as well as the fellow that runs the hunt, being as they, not me, were going to wind up in posession of anything of value that I found.

I would equate it to a charter tuna fishing trip, expensive, and all is said and done the charter captain gets the tuna fish and I get the bait.

I do hope it works out for you and you wind up with what you dug!

gw

Really? What did you find and not get back? Or not get compensated for?

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