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Steve Herschbach

Gold Bug Pro Vs AT Gold Vs X-terra 705 Gold Vs Lobo Supertraq Vs MXT

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Thanks Steve! I'm into reloading as well, so have plenty of lead bullets to practice on!!! In all honesty, I have read that you can practice on detecting a small flattened lead fishing weight, so I was planning on trying to do that initially to get a feel for how the GB Pro works. Kinda like I practiced panning with some lead BBs. I also live near the Fisher plant in El Paso and am planning on a "field trip" there to have a factory rep go over the machine with me. Once I do this, my initial trips will be to some of the nearby GPAA claims and then branch out from there....

Thanks again for setting up a great site!

Mike

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Another tip for in town. Go aluminum detecting. Gold and aluminum read the same also. Go to anywhere it is easy to dig, like the sand or wood chips around playground equipment, swimming beaches, volleyball courts, etc. Go nugget detecting and by that I mean set it up just like you intend to hunt nuggets, and be sure and use a scoop. You can dig everything (I do) or use a little discrimination and try to dig all non-ferrous.

It does not matter really what you find. You are getting practice. Try and find the smallest aluminum you can and as deep as you can. Foil is good. Aluminum pull tabs are held on cans by tiny aluminum rivets. Evil people like to tear the tab off and toss it for people like me to dig up. The little aluminum rivet also gets lost. I actually can find that tiny rivet with a hot detector. If you can do that, you are a nugget hunting pro.

If you chose to use a little discrimination to eliminate small steel wire, paper clips, staples and such, try this. Use as little discrimination as possible to reject these items. You can set the Gold Bug Pro to give a low tone on the ferrous and a higher tone on the non-ferrous. For an experiment, still go ahead and dig everything. If you concentrate on faint targets, you will get some low tone ferrous readings that turn out to be foil or other small aluminum items. This happens also when nugget detecting. Tiny non-ferrous items in iron mineralized ground will fool the detector because the amount of iron in the ground overwhelms the tiny non-ferrous signal. This happens on deeper, larger items also. You do this enough and it will teach you that A. discrimination can be helpful in really trashy places but B. never get too dependent on it. It will leave gold in the ground.

I was out hunting a "tot lot" just yesterday. Those are playground areas where moms take the tots to play. I dug lots of tiny wire and aluminum. Did this for two hours, nothing "good" except some coins. Had a great time though; detecting just relaxes me. I enjoy the process more than anything and enjoy doing something well. The finds are a bonus. And the tot lots will surprise at times with a ring or an earring.

I really believe detectors are like musical instruments. It takes practice to get good with one, and it takes practice to stay good with one. I never stop metal detecting. It is a rare week I do not go detecting at least a couple times, if not more.

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Steve, Thanks to this thread and TrinityAU, I have purchased a Gold Bug Pro with both coils... should be fun

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I'm needing thawed ground now.  Pulled the trigger on an ATGold from Bowens Hideout here in Spokane.  Met some really nice folks at the Northwest Treasure Hunters club too. Myself and a couple of buddies will be joining up with them at the next meeting.  Now to study the book that came with the ATGold as well as keeping up with this forum.  I'm really glad I found this forum.  Thanks again, Steve.

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  • Similar Content

    • By Steve Herschbach
      Fisher Research originally released the 19 kHz Gold Bug model about 1987. It was a real breakthrough design at the time with a compact control box, S-rod, and elliptical coils. The detector is a good unit but is strictly all metal (no discrimination). It has no LCD readout and looks much like the current Gold Bug 2 but has a white lower rod and a black control panel face. Some people are confusing this old model with the new so be aware of this when looking at used detectors. The 19 kHz coils for the old Gold Bug will not work on newer versions of the Gold Bug below.
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      1987 era analog Fisher Gold Bug
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      Click on images below for larger versions.....



    • By Mike Hillis
      Decided to get me another AT Pro.
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    • By Steve Herschbach
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    • By phrunt
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