Jump to content
Gerry in Idaho

Show Us Your Favorite Ring Find From 2018

Recommended Posts

16 hours ago, GaryC/Oregon Coast said:

I think all the rings I found in 2018 came with gumballs!

 

GaryC/Oregon Coast

Too funny Gary. I couldn’t stop laughing!

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My favorite two rings found this year.

The gold band is my wedding ring that had slipped off my finger while shooting a bow in my backyard. Was lost for 2 years. Found it with the Equinox.

The silver ring was a beach find I found with the Deus and HF Eliptical Coil.

 

B0D109DA-218F-401B-9841-BB04BD88EE6F.jpeg

E0DDBF90-A5F4-4CA6-B78D-1D5E2D4AA993.jpeg

 

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well heck BeachHunter,  You get rewarded twice with your wedding band.  I bet the wife enjoyed the find two.  That sterling ring is quite cool too and looks to have been in the salt water for a while.  Thanks for sharing.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Gerry… congratulations on such beauties!!! Impossible to pick out a favorite as each exemplifies my idea of what treasure can or should be. Fantastic finds, WTG!!! :cool:

Most of my ring finds this past season were gold wedding bands and oddball silver rings as is the usual trend here. With that in mind, my favorite is a 13.6-gram 18K gold wedding band depicted below. It’s a good solid piece, most wedding bands are either 10K or 14K so I was quite pleased with its weightiness. 

1931567535_18KLARGEGOLDRINGSFYG17.JPG.b32f15d16a65b8de86355c2b308de8c0.JPG

The second find is a 7.6-gram sterling silver skull and crossbones ring. The probability of finding one always seemed forlorn but I had hoped one would surface someday. It was just out from the swing set at a local park, at maybe three inches depth, and therefore likely lost within the previous five years. I just stared at it in surprised disbelief!!!

1440926783_SKULLCROSSBONESRINGSFYG18.JPG.019949bf33f14e5a9a08fa9464aaed32.JPG

Ontario offers countless popular freshwater beaches for detectorists to search. In areas north of Toronto, these have attracted ever-increasing numbers of our Asian heritage community. A result is a corresponding increase in 22K gold ring finds, a typical example is the 5.9-gram 22K ring below. To date our 22K rings have generally been a smaller finger-size than we’ve seen with 10K to 18K rings over the years. 

178395039_22KRINGFRANKLINSFYG18.JPG.b6a015663b1377d4231298895645c43b.JPG

Thanks for a really nifty thread Gerry, you have a talent for bringing forward the fun side of treasure hunting………………….Jim. 

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like your style and selection Jim.  Nice monster 1/3 ozt of 18K gold band. The Rocker of today's younger society with the sterling skull & cross bones, followed by the 22K perfection of Asian quality.  In all my years I only have 2 higher end rings over 18K.  2 years ago I found a Portuguese stamped ring that is 19.2K and my all time best is a plain heavy yellow gold band marked 24K. It is the solftest and most easily dented gold ring I have ever seen.  Thanks for your added contribution of ring save treasures.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Two more weeks left in 2018, some good low tides and possibly some wave action coming up, but this is my favorite to date.  13.6 grams 14k with ice.  CTX 3030 with 11" coil.  Still my #1 detector for majority of conditions on beach.  Intertidal wash zone/water line 12"+ deep.  

14k_5.jpg

DSC03387.JPG

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now that’s a beautiful ring JP! Congratulations on the find!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/9/2018 at 9:52 PM, phrunt said:

Geez, either my 18k 15 gram Lord of the Rings One Ring

20181001_075229_DxO.jpg.e796e2378d3ed4d8

 

That is awesome!!!!  I would have been super excited on this one!!!  I have only been to NZ once so maybe you guys down there are tired of LOTR fans LOL

  • Like 3
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A 13 on my Equinox, I thought for sure it was a nickel, very surprising.

 

2018122995091622 (1).jpg

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Similar Content

    • By devilsrenegade
      Big Arm state park on Flathead lake with my mxt and the detech 10x5 coil. ran it in relic mode with the sens. hot and the disc pot set at 2. the prospectors pick worked great to get through the cobbles to recover the targets. Highlights were .65 gram silver bracelet, 54 s and 56 wheat's, and junk butterfly pendant. it sure was nice to be out swinging. just thought I'd share my first hunt this year.
      The best of luck to all ! 




    • By sullivan2002
      Hi to app.
      I have a Nox 600 since 1 year and I used here in Italy to find everywhere  generally on beaches but not only.
      I choosed to buy the 600 instead of the 800 version due to the fact that here I can't find native Gold but this is my opinion that for me Nox 800 was wasted.
      I found just 4 Gold little items last year and I made a lot of work for that. I digged a lot on beaches and I digged from VDI 1 to VDI 29 in Beach 1 and 2 depending of near the sea or just in the Sand. As I remember 3 little rings bad VDI 6, 10 and 12.
      Now what I want to ask you in your experience is:
      Is it ok to stay with 600? Or could be very different for finding gold rings in the beach (my possibile gold items here are just rings and other little items on beach, no native gold nuggets...)
      Is a good idea to change mi finding way to All Metal mode?
      I used generally 5 tones. Do you advice me to start Learning the 50 tones in the way that I could choose to dig low ID (2 to 12) and be more helpful to find gold instead of tinfoil. Now the probability that from VDI 2 to 12 could be gold items la very low just looking at the target ID.
      In your esperience with Equinox which trick or method you advise me most for the search for gold objects like rings or earrings or small objects on the beach?
      Thank you very much. Every SUGGESTION is appreciated.
      I would like to see a table of VDI made by you diggers  to compare it with mine on attachment related to findings here in Italy:

      Best
      Pat
       
             
    • By idahogold
      Been Watching Matt a Longtime"😍 Enjoy! Ig
       
    • By Alluminati
      This is a pat myself on the back kind of thread.
      Here is the bulk of my aluminum shown with this seasons gold. Just over an ounce.
      What isn't shown is a bit of larger can slaw and smaller foil, but rest assured there wasn't that much more, call it 20% higher target count if you want.
      This represents positive ID gold signals, the easy ones you shouldn't be leaving.
      My nephew wants to collect tabs and beaver tails, which is the reason I have them still this year.
      No doubt I threw out a couple modern tabs early in the season, however I reluctantly agreed to collect those too. lol
      Tonight I thought it would be interesting to see how much aluminum I dug to get that gold. These gold targets ranged from 1-22 TID. Only dig nickles? You fool!
      So what do you think? Is that a lot of aluminum? Are you sure? Think about it, I bet you've dug way more pennies than this just to see a silver coin make an appearance. Would you rather another silver dime or have your Equinox paid for?
      Advice is a hard thing to take, if it's common knowledge it probably wont help you find much. Remember 10% of the people get 90% of the goods. That means the other 90% are sharing the 10% left behind. One group is relying on statistics and probability while the other relies on pure luck.
      Don't notch aluminum, you must close your eyes and drink from the hose.
      Yes I'm on a high horse, I get double digit gold every year from this little town while most of my peers get nothing. NOTHING EVER. They have lots of advice and complaints and reasons to notch numbers. So proud to talk clad counts. These people don't work either, myself I'm gone 50-60 hours a week.
      I love aluminum, whats the matter with you people!
      This Equinox smacks gold like FBS smacks silver.  Pay a stranger $5 to kick you in the ass if you need to.
            Happy New Year, Alluminati rules.
       


       

    • By Steve Herschbach
      A common misperception among those new to metal detecting is that metal detectors can identify one metal from another. How much we wish that were true. The reality is that for all practical purposes the common metal detector target id scale is based on a combination of the conductive or ferrous properties of the item multiplied by the size and shape of the item.
      There are two common terms in use for this scale. The Target ID or TID scale is the most generic. White's also popularized the use of Visual Discrimination Indicator or VDI numbers. You will see references to both TID and VDI numbers and both refer to the same thing. The problem when you use Google is that TID also refers to Terminal ID number, which is for credit card machines. VDI gets far better results as the preferred term and so is what I will use from now on.
      The VDI scale is almost always arranged the same way by common convention although in theory it can be rearranged any way you want. The common scale has ferrous items on the low end and non-ferrous items on the high end. Ferrous items are like mirror images of non-ferrous items and so the most common arrangement of the VDI scale is with small items in the middle with ferrous getting larger in one direction and non-ferrous getting larger in the other direction. The ferrous and non-ferrous ranges actually overlap in the middle.
      Large Non-Ferrous
      Medium Non-Ferrous
      Small Non-Ferrous
      Tiny Ferrous/Non-Ferrous Overlap
      Small Ferrous
      Medium Ferrous
      Large Ferrous
      We can assign a numeric range to this basic VDI scale any way we want. Many early machines went with a 0 - 100 scale, with the ferrous compressed into the low end of the scale:
      100 Large Non-Ferrous
      50 Medium Non-Ferrous
      20 Small Non-Ferrous
      5 Tiny Ferrous/Non-Ferrous Overlap
      3 Small Ferrous
      1 Medium Ferrous
      0 Large Ferrous
      The idea of ferrous as negative numbers made sense due to the mirror imaging in size between ferrous and non-ferrous. A very common White's scale runs from -95 to 0 to +95
      95 Large Non-Ferrous
      50 Medium Non-Ferrous
      15 Small Non-Ferrous
      0 Tiny Ferrous/Non-Ferrous Overlap
      -15 Small Ferrous
      - 20 Medium Ferrous
      - 40 Large Ferrous
      The "positive only" 0 - 100 VDI scale seems most popular these days with other manufacturers, but the scheme varies. Two very common setups are 0-40 ferrous and 41-99 non-ferrous OR 0-10 ferrous and 11-99 non-ferrous. But as I noted you can set this up any way you want and so other scales do exist.
      When we look at just the non-ferrous part of the scale, what is important is how the detector "sees" the target. In very simple terms conductive targets are either very weak or very strong or somewhere in between. Small items are weak targets. Low conductive metals are weak targets. Large items are strong targets. High conductive metals are strong targets. The shape matters. Irregular shapes  or thin items are weak targets. Rounded and thick items are strong targets.
      On a conductive scale of 0 to 100:
      0 = very small targets 100 = very large targets
      0 = very thin targets 100 = very thick targets
      0 = very low conductive metals 100 = very high conductive metals
      0 = very irregular shaped targets 100 = very rounded targets, especially is a hole in the middle
      Add this all up and small gold items are low on the VDI scale and large gold items high on the scale. Silver being a better conductor than gold, a silver item will read higher on the scale than the identical size and shape gold item. In general silver will read higher than gold. However, a very large gold item can read higher than a very small silver item. Chasing thin hammered silver coins in the U.K., especially the cut varieties, is not that different than hunting gold nuggets.
      What you rapidly figure out is the metal detector VDI scale can only get repeatable results on certain man made items that are the same every time, like a U.S. nickel or a U.S. dime. And even these signals degrade when deep in the ground or in proximity to other items under the search coil at the same time. Given all the limitations, it is a wonder we get any degree of accuracy at all with detector discrimination systems.
      With that, I give you a standardized White's VDI scale taken directly from the control box of my White's DFX. This -95 to 0 to +95 scale is common on many modern White's detectors. Nearly all other detectors have the same relative positioning of items just with different numeric scales, an exception of note being the Fisher CZ detectors, which use a rearranged scale. This DFX scale is helpful because it includes gold coins.
      The main thing I want you to focus on here is the relative positioning of items on the scale. As a detectorist operating in the United States, I always pay attention to just three things 1. where do the ferrous numbers start? 2. where does a U.S. nickel read? and 3. where does a U.S. dime read? If I know those three things, I can adjust almost instantly to any detector scale in existence, because I know how everything else reads in relation to those three points on the scale.

      Standard White's VDI scale
      Looking at the scale you can use gold coins as a rough guide to where large gold nuggets will read, although coins being pure gold and round will read much better than gold nuggets of the same size. It might take a one pound gold nugget to read the same as a one ounce $20 gold coin, which in turn reads very close to the U.S. silver quarter reading.
      On the other end, tiny gold, tiny ferrous, and salt water, being a low conductive target, all overlap. This is why if you tune out salt water on the beach, you also tune out single post gold ear rings and thin gold chains, which read like small gold nuggets. If a prospector tunes out salt alkali readings on a salt lake, there go the small gold readings. And the chart shows that if you get too aggressive in rejecting all ferrous items, good items can be lost also.
      When I say small it is important to note what we are really talking about is small/weak readings. A large gold item buried very deep in mineralized ground will have a very weak reading and appear as a small target to the detector. This means a very deep large items can appear just like a very small gold item and be lost for the very same reasons as those small items. Again, think weak targets and strong targets to get a better feel for how things react in the field.
      To sum up, gold and platinum are low conductive metals, and when also small in size read very low on the VDI scale, even dipping into the ferrous range. The foil range is the sweet spot for ear rings, thin gold chains, small womens rings, and platinum items. In general women's gold rings will read below a U.S. nickel and men's gold rings will fall above a U.S. nickel on the VDI scale. Nearly all gold nuggets found by most people are going to read nickel and lower just because nearly all gold nuggets are small. However, as this photo I made using my DFX and some gold nuggets shows, gold nuggets can read all over the place due to their shape and purity. Surprisingly, if you add silver to gold the conductivity drops as alloys are less conductive than pure metals. This makes many gold jewelry items and gold nuggets far harder to detect than would be the case were they pure gold. See this article for details on this nugget photo Some Gold Nugget VDI Numbers

      Target id numbers for naturally occurring gold nuggets
      You can get some great spreadsheets for jewelry VDI numbers for White's and Minelab detectors here.
      There are no doubt many people who have read this who are just shaking their head and thinking "this is why I just dig everything". I absolutely agree, when at all possible, that is the best solution. Unfortunately it simply is not possible in some locations where trash targets outnumber the good by thousands to one. This is where knowing the VDI scale and how it works can pay off.
      The best book ever written on the subject of discrimination is "Taking A Closer Look At Metal Detector Discrimination" by Robert C. Brockett. It is out of print but if you find a copy grab it, assuming the topic interests you.

    • By Sinclair
      In case somebody has missed it:
       
      Now that's impressive.. great work, thank you!
       
       
       
×