Jump to content

Recommended Posts


Hi Jim, thanks for your reply. Your specimens look great. I did a streak test, and it was black. Maybe it was the silver sulfide coating? My PI ,or the GPZ did pick it up from over a foot, so not sure. Also is there anything I should do the the specimen? To clean? Thank you

Chris

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sometimes cuprite can appear very dark gray, almost black. Its real hard to do mineral ID by a simple photo - even a good clear one. Cuprite will make your detector sound off at a good distance.  Cuprite is a copper mineral that conducts electricity like a metal. Its often a very dark red but can range to a dark gray almost silver color.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Reno Chris said:

Sometimes cuprite can appear very dark gray, almost black. Its real hard to do mineral ID by a simple photo - even a good clear one. Cuprite will make your detector sound off at a good distance.  Cuprite is a copper mineral that conducts electricity like a metal. Its often a very dark red but can range to a dark gray almost silver color.

Thanks Chris, it definitely looks like a copper mineral. I'll keep trying to figure out what it is.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Possibly chalcocite, another conductive copper mineral, and dark grey color more the norm.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chris,

  Ill try to get an XRF on it sometime this week, hopefully tomorrow, and let you know.... very cool looking though.

Dave.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chris, you now have several possibilities and I'll throw in another, covellite, closely related to 

Steve's  idea of chalcocite. What we collect is usually blue but I have seen some so dark it looks black.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Chris… it’s a subjective decision, but for whatever it’s worth I wouldn’t do any treatment to your sample. It displays well and is otherwise quite an attractive specimen in its current state. Dave hopefully can satisfactorily identify it for you shortly. 

It is not a simple task to identify your mineral based on a photograph. A black streak test result implies a mineral compound, and not strictly a native metal. Some non-metal minerals do react to both VLF and PI units, producing good metalliferous type signals. In northeastern Ontario, these include solidly structured pyrrhotite, niccolite, cobalt, safflorite, skutterudite, and quite a number of potential silver-cobalt-nickel-iron-arsenide mineral permutations that you will never encounter in generally circulated mineralogical texts.

The silver mineral combinations are sufficiently complex and numerous as to require a reference list from the local museum, and more sophisticated identification techniques are required than the common mineral field tests normally available to hobbyists. We can easily imagine that such minerals would present insurmountable identification issues for hobbyists in the field and certainly the same applies in the context of forum discussion here.

Many of these minerals freshly exposed would produce a similar appearance to the silvery material in your photo. But the primarily cobalt-nickel-iron-arsenide related minerals do not necessarily account for the black host material in your photo with any real confidence. And frankly, I have no idea if these mineral types potentially even exist in your search areas.

There are other suggestions above, such as the enriched copper sulfides (bornite-covellite-chalcocite) that do produce VLF target signals, but do not react to my PI units. Unfortunately I’m not familiar with GPZ responses to various minerals because we have no hands-on experience with it to date.

Attached are a few mineral examples mentioned in this thread including a photo of low-grade cuprite (it’s all I’ve got). Chris R. above makes a perfectly viable case for this mineral’s consideration. Thanks for an interesting topic, it’s been an enjoyable diversion to post our possible solutions for you!!! :cool:

1598368181_1.8OZTCHALCOCITESF16YGLASS.JPG.556b4a40b588feb06c321ba6ba0658b7.JPG

1412359132_0.4LBCOVELLITESF14BB.JPG.82b13ec6a7ade0bc470951c80d940bc2.JPG

1985849064_0.9OZTLOW-GRADECUPRITETWOSF17GG.JPG.747236915d0e2d7ab4e9bf74dd85404d.JPG

  • Like 6
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Jim Hemmingway said:

Hi Chris… it’s a subjective decision, but for whatever it’s worth I wouldn’t do any treatment to your sample. It displays well and is otherwise quite an attractive specimen in its current state. Dave hopefully can satisfactorily identify it for you shortly. 

It is not a simple task to identify your mineral based on a photograph. A black streak test result implies a mineral compound, and not strictly a native metal. Some non-metal minerals do react to both VLF and PI units, producing good metalliferous type signals. In northeastern Ontario, these include solidly structured pyrrhotite, niccolite, cobalt, safflorite, skutterudite, and quite a number of potential silver-cobalt-nickel-iron-arsenide mineral permutations that you will never encounter in generally circulated mineralogical texts.

The silver mineral combinations are sufficiently complex and numerous as to require a reference list from the local museum, and more sophisticated identification techniques are required than the common mineral field tests normally available to hobbyists. We can easily imagine that such minerals would present insurmountable identification issues for hobbyists in the field and certainly the same applies in the context of forum discussion here.

Many of these minerals freshly exposed would produce a similar appearance to the silvery material in your photo. But the primarily cobalt-nickel-iron-arsenide related minerals do not necessarily account for the black host material in your photo with any real confidence. And frankly, I have no idea if these mineral types potentially even exist in your search areas.

There are other suggestions above, such as the enriched copper sulfides (bornite-covellite-chalcocite) that do produce VLF target signals, but do not react to my PI units. Unfortunately I’m not familiar with GPZ responses to various minerals because we have no hands-on experience with it to date.

Attached are a few mineral examples mentioned in this thread including a photo of low-grade cuprite (it’s all I’ve got). Chris R. above makes a perfectly viable case for this mineral’s consideration. Thanks for an interesting topic, it’s been an enjoyable diversion to post our possible solutions for you!!! :cool:

1598368181_1.8OZTCHALCOCITESF16YGLASS.JPG.556b4a40b588feb06c321ba6ba0658b7.JPG

1412359132_0.4LBCOVELLITESF14BB.JPG.82b13ec6a7ade0bc470951c80d940bc2.JPG

1985849064_0.9OZTLOW-GRADECUPRITETWOSF17GG.JPG.747236915d0e2d7ab4e9bf74dd85404d.JPG

 

On 1/8/2019 at 7:46 AM, Steve Herschbach said:

Possibly chalcocite, another conductive copper mineral, and dark grey color more the norm.

 

17 hours ago, Bob(AK) said:

Chris, you now have several possibilities and I'll throw in another, covellite, closely related to 

Steve's  idea of chalcocite. What we collect is usually blue but I have seen some so dark it looks black.

 

On 1/7/2019 at 9:45 PM, Reno Chris said:

Sometimes cuprite can appear very dark gray, almost black. Its real hard to do mineral ID by a simple photo - even a good clear one. Cuprite will make your detector sound off at a good distance.  Cuprite is a copper mineral that conducts electricity like a metal. Its often a very dark red but can range to a dark gray almost silver color.

These were the test results on the scan20190109_163555.thumb.jpg.a972e40c943c1127d7d97e4a821460f3.jpg

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Similar Content

    • By Againstmywill
      I found this at the same place the 1899 Barber Dime came from, the old farm where I grew up in Wisconsin. It appears to be brass, and the thin strip of metal makes a "bwonggg" sound when plucked. Any guesses?






    • By Steve Herschbach
      How many of you have a non-human prospecting or detecting buddy? Dog, cat, burro, reconnaissance bird... whatever. Post a pic and tell us about them. Here is  chance to brag about our best friends! 
    • By Hard Prospector
      Well my Sand Shark is about finished so time to shop for a new dedicated (salt water ) beach detector. This machine will be dedicated to wet sand and/or surf only environment. Currently considering the ATX and TDIBH,, any suggestions / input would be appreciated.............Thanks!
      Rob
    • By alaskaseeker
      Anyone hunting near Bristol this August?
    • By phrunt
      Fancy an Equinox 800 for $200 USD?  Look no further, you can now buy a proper Chinese version!
      https://www.alibaba.com/product-detail/FOR-ORIGINAL-Minelab-EQUINOX-800-Multi_62008021393.html?spm=a2700.7724857.normalList.1.16ae2ca3PKFzyf

       
      It looks like they've now made Fake Gold Monsters too, Mine Lab ones 🙂, it really never ends does it, now people even have to be careful buying a trusty GM1000 😞
      https://www.alibaba.com/product-detail/Free-delivery-Mine-lab-Monster-1000_62008484260.html?spm=a2700.7724838.2017115.65.65a64b7bZJj1LY
      https://www.alibaba.com/product-detail/Free-delivery-Mine-lab-Monster-1000_62005126905.html?spm=a2700.details.maylikehoz.5.24731acb4KLyVb

       
       
      And the Mine Lab SDC 🙂 I guess Mine lab is safe to use but Minelab isn't.
      https://www.alibaba.com/product-detail/New-Sales-Offer-For-SDC-2300_62004764388.html?spm=a2700.details.maylikehoz.5.387b3d13u1Bcdv

       
      And to top it off they sell a detector more expensive than the GPZ!  The high performance Titan Ger 1000! $14,500 USD!!!

      https://www.alibaba.com/product-detail/Titan-Ger-1000-underground-gold-metal_50039522139.html?spm=a2700.7724838.2017115.116.65a64b7bZJj1LY
      I think the lesson to be learnt from this is to buy from Authorized Dealers, and if buying second hand, try verify it's authenticity with original receipts or any way you can.
      😞
       
    • By Jin
      I read a lot of old mining reports or literature relating to the 1850"s - 1870"s when most of the better gold was won. Sometimes I come across information that is really exciting as you know with cross referencing little was mentioned elsewhere about these finds (nuggets - big nuggets!!) So hopefully few people if any have prospected there.
      The only problem is these areas are often almost impenetrable. There either so steep you can barely walk or so over grown trying to get into the area is almost impossible. My biggest fear in these situations is not getting lost but getting bitten by a snake many miles from help. Some of the tiger snakes here even climb trees or lay in the ferns at head height. Which only leaves the winter time to venture in. however during winter the snow is likely going to be a problem. It's really a month or two window of opportunity each year were you have a chance at getting in. 
      Anyway I've got one gully id like to try (many miles away from any gold workings/activity) but im pretty sure its overgrown with blackberries. I recon it would take a a good mile to even get into this gully from a nearby road. Not to mention hacking away at the blackberries with a machete.
      Ive located several areas like this and usually wait for a bush fire or controlled burn to clear the spot but sometimes this dosnt happen. 
      It almost feels like one has to start looking in areas like this where most rational folk would dare to venture to find areas that haven't had lots of attention these days. Sometimes i wish id chosen another hobby, lol
      (Note: I carry a PLB, two way radio, mobile, snake bite kit, lighter, whistle, compass, 2 ltrs water, GPS & spare batteries and sometimes a lever action shotgun for wild dogs. I always communicate exactly where im going and have regular check ins.)  
       
×
×
  • Create New...