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Since I started detecting and started to visit this forum I've seen a number of old classic metal detectors in posts of people reminiscing and really wanted one, not so much because I think it will be something I'd use often, just to have a little piece of the history of detecting and a good addition to my collection.

I never thought I'd see the day one popped up in NZ, it's hard enough to get a Whites detector here in the first place let alone an old classic but today I found one for sale, it's a Coin Master 6000/D

Here is it's auction

https://www.trademe.co.nz/Browse/Listing.aspx?id=1916554080

Was the Coinmaster a decent detector in it's day, is it one that could be collectable??

It seems being old technology it would be reasonably easy to repair if it developed a fault.

Would a coil on such an old detector still work well? Do the plastics go brittle and break easily?

Is $168 USD / 250 NZD a fair price for one?

I'm yet to contact the seller to see if it even works, it's not mentioned it it's advertisement so I can only assume it still works.

I've also always wanted a Whites detector in my herd, the 24k was the one I was hoping for at some stage but I'd settle for an old collectable instead.

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I own a couple vintage detectors. I might put batteries in them once every couple yrs. and wave a coin or gold nugget in front of the coil to listen to it beep. other than that,  they just sit there  collecting dust in the closet or on a shelf. Unless your really into collecting vintage detectors or can get it for dirt cheap, my advice is save the money towards the 24k. The  $168 US seems to be about fair from what I've seen on ebay.

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Old detectors are generally built like tanks and last a long time. Older White's in particular. However, I had an old Compass Yukon 77B that just died sitting on the shelf. Some component just quit - I never did fix it though so am not sure what it was. The only real reason to own old models is nostalgia. I am quite skeptical that they will ever accrue value. $168 seems fine going by what people pay for some of this stuff, but in my opinion just like old computers the best way to get one is $25 at a garage sale.

I still have a 40 year old White's T/R Alaskan I need to fire up and do a thread on one of these days. My one concession to nostalgia, since my first detector was a White's and I am from Alaska. It's the chest mount model on the left below. These three White's models were my first three detector models owned personally.

whites-goldmaster-coinmaster-alaskan-197

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The seller has now lowered the price to 100 NZD, 67 USD.. it's getting tempting.   Almost a garage sale price ?

 

 

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The death of most old electronics is the drying out of the electrolyte and electrolytic capacitors. Most of the time replacing those old caps will bring the unit back to life. Although in most cases why bother when the new machines are so much more capable. Nostalgia I guess.

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3 hours ago, MikeT said:

The death of most old electronics is the drying out of the electrolyte and electrolytic capacitors. Most of the time replacing those old caps will bring the unit back to life. Although in most cases why bother when the new machines are so much more capable. Nostalgia I guess.

Yup, but electronic products between 1999 and 2007 are most at risk, I'd never bother with electronic gear in that age group if I wanted a long lasting product that won't need repairs.  By the end of that period things started to change as capacitor types were changing so the 2006/2007 products started to improve.

See here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capacitor_plague

During that time frame and a few years after I was working in a computer service center and we were replacing components all over the place due to these faulty capacitors, most failed during their 3 year warranty period so there was no cost to the customers but it was a massive job for us.

There were a lot of dry capacitors used in the 70's and early 80's not electrolytic capacitors however they used a lot of tantalum caps which don't age well so I'd be expecting to have to do some capacitor replacements to make it a good working unit, even if just out of precaution.

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