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Steve Herschbach

Fisher Impulse AQ (formerly Aqua Manta) Pulse Induction Metal Detector

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Thanks for the explanation , Steve.  The only pulse I ever owned was a few decades ago, the Garrett XL200.  

It ignored all bad ground, but then it was not a deep machine.  I did find a bunch of gold rings with it though.

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On 2/1/2019 at 2:42 AM, Steve Herschbach said:

The GP Extreme timings are not set up for salt though an anti-interference coil (salt coil) can help. The GPX series added Salt Mode. See Minelab GPX Timings

I used to run a GP extreme on the beach. If I was away from powerlines I'd use a DD in Mono and Sensitive, and if that moaned a bit I'd go to Salt mode. Worked well. When near power lines or other interference, just run in Cancel. The GPX4500 was better, and I could run a Mono coil due to having other goodies like adjustable motion speed and Rx Gain, but you could never actually ground balance on the wet sand. The GPX5000 in Salt Gold is the first PI that will work perfectly with a mono coil on the wet sand. Just wish it was waterproof ?

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Good news, sounds like we will see it before the end of the year. It’s the only detector I have much interest in at the moment but if it is a beach only detector I may pass. I just need something to replace my now departed Garrett ATX. Loved that machine, but manufacturers either get the ergonomics right or I am passing from now on. Surely Fisher can offer me something better than a TDI Beachunter? Fingers crossed!

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Steve did you see the new MDT-8000 hybrid detector Dankowski was involved with that was just released?

I was on the sign up list to get one of the first ones, but I talked myself out of it because I just don't beach hunt that often and I don't think I need anything like it for relic hunting sites.  Still, seems to be slaying it at the beach.

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Here’s the text from the Russian website = via Google translate  - One note = his point 3. Below - the adjustment he is referring to is with the “Iron Mask” contort.  This sets the level of the iron ID/silence function.

Fisher Impulse AQ - a new pulse metal detector with metal discrimination! (New 2019, first photos!) BY DETECTORIST · 03/12/2019 

Yes, friends, it happened! Fisher Lab has announced its new product - the Fisher Impulse AQ metal detector! A fundamentally new development and, it seems, a revolutionary device in the world of metal detectors.  It was not possible to test much of the novelty, it was hidden at the Fisher Lab stand at IWA Outdoors 2019. Fishers do not like to shout much, but this is what I found out: 

1. The novelty is a pulse device, but with discrimination of ferrous metal and gold. Designed specifically to find gold jewelry and small gold chains and earrings. Since this is a pulse device, it will work without problems on any beaches. 

2. So far, the metal detector is at the final tests stage, the appearance and some characteristics may change. 

3. The metal detector has several search modes - you can shift the detection of the conductivity of metals, for example: you can move the detection towards poorly conducted metals (fine gold) and at the same time eliminate highly conductive targets (large coins of silver and copper), and vice versa - look for large targets and cut off weakly conductive.  

4. Tonality: in the “all metals” mode - one tone, then there is the “2 tones” mode and the “mute” mode.  

5. The device is assembled from high-strength components, it can be seen through the cable thickness, and through a capacious battery, along the coil connector (the largest connector of all seen!) The metal detector is waterproof up to 1 meter - work up to your neck and lift gold just right. 

6. Unusual and mounting the coil to the rod, also a novelty, not seen before. 

7. Battery life up to 10 hours. You can connect a larger battery and increase the operating time up to 20 hours. 

8. Yes, there is no screen on the device. And why is the screen needed? All the necessary settings are there - volume, threshold tone, iron mask, saturation mode. You can change modes, check the battery level, cut off the noise. 

9. Pulse devices have always had a problem - no discrimination. Now the problem is solved and this means that you can walk in all places as if not knocked out. 

10. Price. In the region of 2100-2500 US dollars. New technologies cost money, yes, but they also bring an advantage over all other metal detectors.

11. Soon there will be models for searching for gold nuggets, as well as for searching for coins and relics.  

12. To the touch the weight is about 1.6-1.8 kg, the balancing is not bad, the device does not pull towards the coil.  My first testing showed that the trash and other targets cut off the sound with a bang, and the gold ring on the finger is very beautiful and pleasant in all positions of the ring! Such a signal is not to be confused with anything.  Well, the first tests will show, the first impression is very pleasant and interesting, waiting for more news!  Video on the metal detector will be very soon, wait! 

5039C378-5FC1-4A7E-B2FD-3358E8665838.jpeg

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This looks like a very innovated detector for a pulse unit when you examine the feature set. 

  • Pulse delay starts at 7 and runs up to 12.    (A pulse delay of 7 is a feat right there)
  • Iron Mask   
  • Noise cancel
  • SAT settings
  • Sensitivity (Coil Voltage)
  • All Metal mode
  • Tone ID mode
  • Mute mode (silence a tone )

Looks like something to pursue to me.   

What would you add for inland use?   

  • A progressive mute mode tied to the iron mask setting to give a mineral vs metal break point?    
  • Choice of mute mode selection.  Tie it to the pulse delay selection.  7 -10 mute high conductors.  11, mute hole (medium conductors) 11 - 12 mute low conductors.

Any ideas????

HH
Mike

 

 

 

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Mike, you correctly identified the issues.

On the AQ, the combination of Iron Mask and SAT, govern where the iron silence/ID kick in.  It has been announced previously that the AQ has no wide range GB control to eliminate the kind of extreme mineralization found in many gold nugget hunting enviornments.

How an eventual inland version would handle more extremes ferrous mineralization is not known outside the development team.

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19 hours ago, Cal_Cobra said:

Steve did you see the new MDT-8000 hybrid detector Dankowski was involved with that was just released?

I was on the sign up list to get one of the first ones, but I talked myself out of it because I just don't beach hunt that often and I don't think I need anything like it for relic hunting sites.  Still, seems to be slaying it at the beach.

Yeah, I have followed it closely. I set up a reviews page about it back in December...

There are multiple threads about the Tarsacci on the Metal Detector Advice & Comparisons Forum including this one. Goldbrick also reported here.

 

 

Impulse AQ - I like it. Referential to the old Fisher Impulse. If the machine is even remotely as pictured I will probably get one. It may not be designed for dry land use in extreme ground but there is plenty of ground in Nevada that is relatively mild but which does have a lot of alkali salt in the ground, maybe a few hot rocks. If nothing else it looks like a killer Lake Tahoe detector.

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      Average basic igneous rocks
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      Gneiss
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      Limestone
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      Sandstone
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      Shale
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      Black sand layers on beach
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      Soils derived from felsic igneous rocks
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      Soils derived from basic igneous rocks
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      Soils derived from basic igneous rocks tend to be dominated by maghemite.
      Basic igneous hot rocks
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      Felsic igneous hot rocks
      probably
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      Volcanic hot rocks or black sand beaches (i.e. Hawaii)
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      References
      Da Costa, A.C.S, Bigham, JM, Rhoton, FE, and SJ Traina. 1999. Quantification and Characterization of Maghemite in Soils Derived from Volcanic Rocks in Southern Brazil. Clays and Clay Minerals, v. 47, no. 4, p. 466-73.
      Hunt, CP, Moskowitz, BM, and SK Banerjee. 1995. Magnetic Properties of Rocks and Minerals. In Rock Physics & Phase Relations: A Handbook of Physical Constants, Volume 3.
      Koch, C.B, Borggaard, OK, and A. Gafur. 2005. Formation of iron oxides in soils developed under natural fires and slash-and-burn based agriculture in a monsoonal climate (Chittagong Hill Tracts, Bangladesh). Hyperfine Interact 166, 579–584.
      Rivers, JM, Nyquist, JE, Terry, D.O., and W. E. Doll. 2004. Investigation into the Origin of Magnetic Soils on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee. Soil Science Society of America Journal, Vol. 68 No. 5 p. 1772-1779.

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