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steveg

Equinox Complete Carbon-fiber Shafts Are Now Available!

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Sandi --

Yes, I produce carbon-fiber shafts for the Equinox.  I will send you a PM, regarding a possible shaft for your husband's Equinox.

Thanks for your interest!

Steve

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