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Moore Creek Adventures

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That is a very nice mass!  Beautiful.

Mitchel

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I’m new. So maybe this is just me being new but - omg! I’ve never seen anything like that. It looks like little fern leaves! Is it a mass of smaller pieces with gravel gluing them together or does the gold go through a mostly solid rock chunk or...? And how big IS that thing, anyway???

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19 minutes ago, jinmon said:

I’m new. So maybe this is just me being new but - omg! I’ve never seen anything like that. It looks like little fern leaves! Is it a mass of smaller pieces with gravel gluing them together or does the gold go through a mostly solid rock chunk or...? And how big IS that thing, anyway???

Those are called dendrites, a little rare perhaps...

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All I can say George is that you sure helped make up one hell of a crew. Seems like there was nothing we could not get done when we put our minds to it. Moore Creek was an amazing journey. I am glad it gave you a place to heal... a great big hug to you my friend!

And of course you go and find perhaps the most spectacular specimen found at the mine. Far from the largest but lots of museums would be happy to display it.

 

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Beautiful crystalline specimen George.

Yes, bulldozer pilot startermotors. Many not so fond memories of those damn things.

Great stories you tell Steve - - -

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Stunningly beautiful. :wub:

JW :smile: 

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That’s a real beauty Keith! How big is it... hard to tell without reference.

I sold most of my Moore Creek gold but I think I have a couple pieces left.

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17 hours ago, jinmon said:

I’m new. So maybe this is just me being new but - omg! I’ve never seen anything like that. It looks like little fern leaves! Is it a mass of smaller pieces with gravel gluing them together or does the gold go through a mostly solid rock chunk or...? And how big IS that thing, anyway???

The story goes into it but short answer 3.74 ounces. It is a gold/quartz specimen showing a lumpy dendritic growth pattern. It is as it eroded directly from the original source and is not a mass of small nuggets that have conglomerated together somehow.

Moore Creek produced some spectacular specimen pieces but most frankly were best referred to as “rocks with gold in them”.

It is a coincidence but I have been working on a photo gallery of my finds and it will include lots of close up photos of many Moore Creek nuggets and specimens. I got on it some time back and then got sidelined so it may be time to get that part of the website up and running.

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