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Excellent day with the Boy...great memories for you both and gold to boot!

It is good to see you post, Jonathan!

happy days

fred

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That's a champion effort, I know exactly what dealing what that humidity is like so it would have been hard going for Tim to keep motivated, especially until he got some glitter in his scoop.

Thanks for the post JP! A pleasure to read about you sending time with your boy.

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sounds like a good day out with your boy JP, congrats.

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Nice JP.  Good effort getting out there at this time of year  

Has Clermont seen much of the rain that further North has seen?  

 

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9 minutes ago, Northeast said:

Nice JP.  Good effort getting out there at this time of year  

Has Clermont seen much of the rain that further North has seen?  

 

We’ve dodged the flooding and also a lot of the rain so the farmers are pretty hopeful for more down this way. 

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The gold is a bonus to spending time with your son, both enjoying your favorite hobby!

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So happy for you JP, you know the difference between gold the mineral and real gold. There is nothing like our kids is there? Best wishes to all of you and enjoy your time together. It always seems too short doesn't it?

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      Simon making out in one piece.  Look how crazy the grass is.

      And the smile happy to have done so.

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