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Prospecting Tourist Looking For Help In Arizona

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It looks like I may have to travel down to Casa Grande, AZ for a week at the end of the month to bring my Mom home to Canada and was wondering if there was anybody in the area that might be up for taking a Canadian prospecting tourist out for some dry washing or metal detecting?

Thanks in advance.

Shane 

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Sorry OFS, will not be in that area until later in the year, good luck.

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Thanks for the note MSC, wish that the timing would have worked out.

Cheers.

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Not much detectable gold around Casa Grande OFS.

In Tucson the Desert Gold Diggers have several good claims to the south. You might consider calling them to see if anyone is planning a trip around that time. Typically their outings are earlier in the month. Cost to join is around $50 first year. If you are down that way much it might be worth joining just for the claims access.

Barry

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