Jump to content

Recommended Posts

On 3/1/2019 at 10:17 AM, Steve Herschbach said:

I don't count on purity of tone - it's simply something I look for. If you do not want to miss targets get a GPZ and dig everything. Everything short of that is a judgment call but attempting to explain nuance is near impossible in writing. That's why it is kind of pointless to weigh in on these sorts of things. Everyone calls their own shots and everyone has a different idea of what makes a good target or a poor one. I am either digging everything, or I am making judgement calls and without exception anyone that does so is leaving good targets behind due to bad calls. Anyone thinking otherwise is kidding themselves.

This is a killer post. It says more in a paragraph than whole threads. Detecting is hugely comprised of judgement calls. Anyone who thinks it's a matter of empirically following tones and vdi's is missing a gigantic area of detecting knowledge; experience, judgement and many times intuition and sometimes flat out guessing.  

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the detailed "Magic Settings" which I am sure many people are setting up as we read.😃  You could have just as easily posted a pic of the Barber Dime and got some 👍's up, but the extra details is what helps so many others.  Even mentioning the smooth even wear of the Barber  and actual weight loss compared to a new one...and realizing it was probably a later drop coin, is golden.  Keep it up GB, I like your swing.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/1/2019 at 10:17 AM, Steve Herschbach said:

I don't count on purity of tone - it's simply something I look for. If you do not want to miss targets get a GPZ and dig everything. Everything short of that is a judgment call but attempting to explain nuance is near impossible in writing. That's why it is kind of pointless to weigh in on these sorts of things. Everyone calls their own shots and everyone has a different idea of what makes a good target or a poor one. I am either digging everything, or I am making judgement calls and without exception anyone that does so is leaving good targets behind due to bad calls. Anyone thinking otherwise is kidding themselves.

When I was reading the beginning of this thread the GPZ came to mind.  It has no TID screen.  How many tones does it have?  We consider it to be the best, most sensitive gold detector out there.  Could someone use it as their only detector?  Sure.  Would I be digging a lot of targets that would be a waste of time?  Sure.  As Steve says it is a judgment call and sometimes you only have a limited amount of time to hunt a site and you or it will be gone.  Sometimes you only have so many holes you want to dig for that session.  Minelab (and all manufacturers) has made many 'judgment calls' for us by the way they set up the machine from the factory and the controls they allow us to change.  Ground balancing is a 'judgment call' of sorts and 'Iron Bias' is another judgment setting, etc, etc.  All of that being said there are times (quickly walking a beach line) when going less than 50 tones to cover an area faster is a better option for me.  I believe on the beach I sometimes miss targets if the machine (and my brain) is trying to process everything too quickly.  I would compare this to the 'find patch' setting on the GPZ which lets it process differently.  The 50 tones are king after you find that patch.

Mitchel

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/1/2019 at 8:53 PM, Gerry in Idaho said:

Tones and the more of them is what I call "Music to the ears".

While I agree this is true when it comes to Minelabs, I've seen other detector vendors try to add "99 tones/delta pitch/fill-in-the-blank)" tones to their detectors, but the audio they convey is harsh and digital sounding, whereas Minelab has proven itself to be able to give us smoother, analog like audio which is more pleasing to the ears.  My point being that just more tones, doesn't always equate to better audio intelligence, sometimes it equates to audio fatigue.  

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, mn90403 said:

When I was reading the beginning of this thread the GPZ came to mind.  It has no TID screen.  How many tones does it have?  We consider it to be the best, most sensitive gold detector out there.  Could someone use it as their only detector?  Sure.  Would I be digging a lot of targets that would be a waste of time?  Sure.  As Steve says it is a judgment call and sometimes you only have a limited amount of time to hunt a site and you or it will be gone.  Sometimes you only have so many holes you want to dig for that session.  Minelab (and all manufacturers) has made many 'judgment calls' for us by the way they set up the machine from the factory and the controls they allow us to change.  Ground balancing is a 'judgment call' of sorts and 'Iron Bias' is another judgment setting, etc, etc.  All of that being said there are times (quickly walking a beach line) when going less than 50 tones to cover an area faster is a better option for me.  I believe on the beach I sometimes miss targets if the machine (and my brain) is trying to process everything too quickly.  I would compare this to the 'find patch' setting on the GPZ which lets it process differently.  The 50 tones are king after you find that patch.

Mitchel

100% agree that use of 50 tones is situational.  It is what I use most of the time, but I have no problem just switching Park 1 on and going with 5 tones and the other settings defaults for a casual coin shoot on a ball field or going with Field 1 on a dry beach and trying to cherry pick deep high conductors in 2-tones.  For the same reasons Mitchel points out above, the limitations of the site (manicured lawn - meaning more precise/selective digging) or time available at a site will determine your approach (e.g., grid it vs. cherry picking vs. canvassing it with more than one mode or detector).

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Similar Content

    • By andy g
      hi all 
       has anyone had trouble  with pairing the 600 with aftermarket headphones  i ordered a pair of low latency  aptx  bluetooth  head phones  which paired fine but just made a crackling  sound so tried some cheaper ones i had in the house  and none of them paired at all so went back to crawfords  who tried the tronds on another 600 and the same again  and  tried pairing  the other phones i took  still would not pair on the  shop 600 only phones that paired and worked  fine were the mindlab ones so had to buy them  so was wondering if anyone else has had this problem with after market  headphones even tried a pair of £200 beats  headphones from the guy across the road and  again they paired  but no sound just a  faint crackling sound could be heard  the guy in crawfords was very helpful and is going to contact  minelab    and ask them about it  so if anyone has had this problem to i would like to hear from  you 
      regards   
                   andy 
       
    • By Gerry in Idaho
      OK,  I need to post this video and maybe it has already been shared?  If so please delete my post.
      Many newer EQ owners out there now and some of the great info and posts are pretty deep.  One of the most ocurring phone calls and emails I get from new 800 customers is on how to sync the wireless headphones to the detector.  Here is a video that makes it so simple.
      Hats off to this young gun Matty for a fine, easy, short informative video.
       
    • By flakmagnet
      I looked all through the Equinox tips here and didn't find anything that addresses this.
      I was detecting using wireless bluetooth earbuds that have worked fine for months. I walked out of range for a few minutes and when I came back the detector was running, the headphone symbol was showing on the control panel but there was no sound coming to the earbuds. I turned the detector off, turned the headphones off. Then turned the detector back on, the detector was working I could hear it, then turned the earbuds back on, the headphone symbol showed, the sound disappeared from the Equinox speaker but would not come through on the earbuds and it was the same thing when I repeated the sequence with wireless headphones that came with the detector.
      I also did resets on the headphones, re-paired with the detector - but the same thing happened.
      Any advice/help would be appreciated.
      Thanks!
    • By Steve Herschbach
      Here is all the latest along with the new instructional video....

      Video Review...
      Specifications and pricing....

      Garrett has released a new set of headphones with built in proprietary wireless capability, the Garrett MS-3 headphone. These headphones can interface directly with new Garrett models with built in wireless, like the new Garrett AT Max. They will not work with anything other than Garrett Z-Lynk compatible detectors and accessories.
      Garrett MS-3 Z-Lynk™ Wireless Headphones PN: 1627710 MSRP $119.95
      Built-in Z-Lynk receiver. High-fidelity audio. Volume control. Adjust signal levels to suit individual hearing requirements and to enhance weak signals. Comfortable headband and ear cushions. Folds down for easy storage. USB charging cable included. Speaker impedance: 8 ohms Frequency response: 30-18,000 Hz.
      The new headphones can be purchased alone or as part of a system with a transmitter box that can work with any detector.
      Garrett MS-3 Z-Lynk™ Wireless Kit PN: 1627720 MSRP $189.95
      Includes:
      Garrett MS-3 Z-Lynk Wireless Headphones WT-1 wireless transmitter 2-pin AT connector to Micro USB cable—connects AT detector to transmitter ¼" Jack to Micro USB cable—connects detector with ¼" jack to transmitter USB charging cable Mounting band For any style metal detector with 2-pin AT connector or ¼" headphone jack

    • By Jonathan Porter
      I recently posted this to another forum and thought it might help benefit others and maybe generate some interesting discussion here.
      A booster can only amplify whatever the detector audio delivers no matter what anyone try’s to tell you. The inbuilt booster speaker system in the Minelab GPX 4500, GPX 5000 is too coarse for effective use via the Target Volume control, this same control is also used on the GPZ 7000 in conjunction with the WM12 and is also too coarse! 
      I originally popularised the booster speaker concept when developing a series of instructional videos, looking for a way to obtain good audio that allowed ambient noise of a goldfields environment to also come through so viewers could experience as close as possible the way a detector sounds when in use. In conjunction with this I also discovered the benefits of removing the immediate audio from your ears and placing it further away allowing faint signals to come through (similar to a Television sounding loud in the kitchen compared to being right in front of it). Our ears are designed to collect sound, especially sound that is further away, our ears are also more sensitive to variation in pitch similar to our eyes are to movement so being able to hear the threshold at all times as a reference point is very important, but not at the expense of those around you and small target signals.
      The aim with a booster speaker is to lift up the overall volume of faint deep targets without drowning everything else out, as such in less trashy sites a higher volume can be used in conjunction with the correct threshold level. You need to set the volume to compliment the threshold, which needs to be smooth and stable, if someone can hear your threshold miles away you’re doing it all wrong and negating any advantage as well as driving other operators around you nuts.
      Best way to go is to set the detectors settings to be smooth and stable, I tend to use conservative Sensitivity/Gain settings along with Volume and Threshold. The Target Volume needs to be kept low to allow the booster to drive the audio without causing distortion, this is especially important on the GPZ 7000. If your detector Target Volume is set to aggressively the booster is then going to amplify that aggressive distorted audio. The threshold needs to be smooth to the ear to start with, if it stutters the amplifier will exacerbate that, if it is too loud it will drown the audio as you boost it.
      The B&Z booster is best used for single or twin speakers, it has a very good range of amplification with hardly any distortion. This is especially important because you need to use the booster to adjust the overall audio to suit the ambient noise conditions, in quiet conditions you lower the booster volume so the threshold is not dominating, if its windy then you increase the volume so the threshold can be clearly heard.
      The B&Z booster runs on 2 x AAA alkaline batteries which should last up to 3 weeks at 6 to 8 hours per day, it is in a plastic housing to cut down on any excess metal on your body. The B&Z can be used with headphones, to do so the volume of the detector needs to be lowered so the booster volume can be lifted above 2 1/2 to 3 to avoid noise and hiss from the potentiometer, with the GPX and GPZ machines this can be as low as 6 or even lower if required depending on the sensitivity of the headphones being used.
      Higher tones tend to require less volume, lower tones more, lower tones (30 and down on Minelab PIs and ZVT) are generally better heard through headphones rather than speakers, this is due to all the natural low frequency noises heard in natural ambient environments, Noise cancelling headphones really compliment low frequency Tones.
      The audio of the Minelab GPX and GPZ machines is converted to analogue via the speakers, boosted speakers tend to iron out the steppy digital nature of the Minelab audio, this helps a lot with running less noise floor filtering through the Stabilizer or Audio Smoothing controls, which is were all the edge of detection depth performance lays. The B&Z only ever magnifies the pure audio of the detector with no colouring of the audio through filtering, you only ever hear the “pure” audio intended by the designer of the metal detector. Call me a purist but that’s the way I prefer to hear my detector.
      Hope this helps
      JP

    • By Majuba Man
      As we all know there are several tools that we use to successfully use our metal detector, one of those being our hearing. Through out our life our hearing skills diminish whether by accident, life style or by aging. I have been wearing hearing aids for a period of time now and they are greatly appreciated, without them there are many things that I would miss, some more than others.
      Using a detector has shown me that hearing and understanding what a detector has has to say is extremely important to be successful. With the aid of hearing enhancers and being able to distinguish between the tones of normal threshold and that slight difference of a target is the difference between success and failure.
      Trying to use every advantage that I can I came up with the idea of using my blue-tooth capable hearing aids and an audio transmitter from the detector to accomplish this. I have the Phonak in the ear canal hearing aids and purchased a ComPilot II receiver which only works with Phonak aids. My hearing specialist initially gave me a Demo receiver and was excited to hear the outcome of my experiment. Since I have the Equinox 600 which is all ready blue-tooth enabled all I had to do was pare the two and give it and shot.
      The results were fantastic, being able to hear the 'outside' noises and having the detector talking to me at the same time was unbelievable! Since the hearing aids and receiver are medical devices there is no perceived lag time like there is with some ear buds and blue-tooth head phones, perfect. I only have 11 hours using this setup in several locations such as curb strips, parks etc. I know that if I can hear in these areas that in the field gold hunting should be exceptional. I would really like to get some more time in but as I write this the temperature is 13*.
      Since the experience with the 600 was so positive I purchased a blue-tooth transmitter from Amazon for $30 and a 3.5mm-1/4” adapter for my other detectors. I can use the adapter on the Whites 24K and with the 1/4” adapter on the SDC2300 I now have total wireless detecting capability. Both the transmitter and receiver charge in only 2 hours and will run for about 10 hours of use time. I do want to try this in different locations but I see absolutely no downside other than having to charge the batteries, no big deal. Anyway, another winter project successfully accomplished.
       
       
       
×
×
  • Create New...