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Hi guys, I wasn't going to bother posting up my tiddlers after Simons single BIG piece trounced my 5 pieces combined by almost twice the weight on his rewarding day. That's what you get for digging every signal. Sure you get a pocket full of .22 shells but that one gram piece was worth it aye. Now I have a confession to make here.  I told Simon I got nothing at his Mr Pocket spot.....:unsure: But I got two. They were my biggest two of the day. .3 of a gram & .09 :rolleyes: 

Simon did a good job on his first post of our day there so I will just cut to the chase. I had done quite well here back with my GP 3000 & little coiltek 10 x 5 mono coil. I put Simon on to some old timer piles hoping his 4500 & 14 x 9 NF Evo coil might punch deeper into & give something up to him. It didn't. While I detected opposite him & working my way to some schist bedrock where I had done well with the GP 3000 on tiny bits. High Yield/Normal sensitivity on 19 & going very slowly scraping the coil over the bedrock when I got to it. Of course it is a shotgun pellet graveyard so got my share of those. :rolleyes: After getting my first few I kept checking all signals.

20190224_141113

This could have well been another pellet. I didn't take a VLF with me so had to be very careful not losing the target after moving it & breaking the "halo" effect & losing the signal. So after a bit of a scrape I blew the dirt & dust away & had my first piece of gold.

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 I continued to detect very slowly on the edge of the grass & the bedrock as there was a bit of a lip & fracture in the bedrock.

In the next pic, which is the same as the above pic but from a different angle, you will see a bit of a depression in the bedrock & the lichen on the bedrock just above & slightly to the right of the scoop.

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I got what I thought was a very slight cough in the threshold going over that depression. A couple of scrapes & removing the lichen revealed that the depression was the edge of a flat slab of schist sitting on top of the bedrock. It was totally unrecognisable & just appeared to be the bedrock surface.

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I have over the years realised just how many bedrock nooks & crannies & secret gold hiding cracks & fractures that lichen can hide. So I flipped the slab over to reveal another bit of a lip & drop off in the bedrock, right at the top edge of the coil. That is where the now improved signal was coming from.

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I scraped the pointy end of the pick along it & revealed a crack going under the now over hanging bedrock. Broke it open & one more scrape had the signal move. A bit more blowing &...piece number two

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Waved the coil very slowly over the rest of that little plateau & was getting nothing but pellets. Got to the last corner of the bedrock & was getting feed up with the pellets when one of them morphed into a tiny piece of gold smaller than a pellet.

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Unbelievable. Simon later made a comment that I had never thought of or considered before, & that was that people just wouldn't believe that I was finding gold this small with that 14" coil on the Zed. But Simon is my witness.

It was at this stage that Simon had found his Mr Pocket & said he could get no more from it & relinquished it to me to try with the Zed. So I did. It was in among that tall dry grass that he has shown his pics of. My first signal was a very good hit, & I thought, here we go a .22 shell. But  no...a .3 of a gram piece of gold. Followed by a fainter signal but a positive one. Very shallow. .09 of a gram. But that was it. Nothing but .22 shells from there on. Even a live one. Thank goodness I got those two bits first off after getting a pocket full of .22 shells after them.

 

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Total of .57 of a gram for 5 pieces. The .3 one really helped lift that total. :laugh:

Mr possum looks a bit delirious with holding all that gold. Or is it the "cigarette" he is smoking?:wink:     His tongue is even hanging out....as well as his dangley bits. :laugh:

possum gold

Cheers

Good luck out there

JW :smile:

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Wooohoo!! I'm glad Mr Pocket produced the goods for you too! I was hoping it would and I had a feeling it would as I found my three in quick succession as you saw and there was plenty more signals there so I left them hoping you'd get some.

Mr Pocket!

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Seeing I was satisfied with what I'd recovered out of Mr Pocket I wanted to pass it onto you hoping you would get some too so I was quite disappointed when it seemed like you didn't get any out of it, my way of thanking you for teaching me how to even find a nugget with a detector.  I did invite you down earlier to have a hunt but you seemed hesitant to intrude so I decided I'd leave the area and give it to you instead.

The photos JW puts up of his tiny little bits make them look bigger than they are, they're absolutely tiny, I've got bigger bits in my sluice in creeks known for their tiny flour gold.

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JW, thanks for posting the pictures, and I'm not quite sure about the little possum fellow in the bottom picture, seems a bit the worse for wear regardless of the gold and the  . . . whatever the little duffer is smoking.

The GPZ is certainly capable of finding small gold it appears. I'm still soldiering on with my GPX 5000, have some new coils I'll be trying this season (if winter ever loosens its grasp!), and I've been learning all I can about how to get the most out of the detector (lots more to learn, I think) as the more I read, and the more videos I watch, it seems more possibilities are revealed.

All the best,

Lanny

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14 hours ago, kiwijw said:

20190224_141213

20190224_144759

20190224_144809

 

Hey JW.  It`s always good to see the gold you get but something I`ve wondered a few times.  I know you`re not a big fan of the 2300 and  I think I read a couple of months ago you still own it.    Have you ever tried your 23 for detecting places like the bedrock in these photos?    My experience with the 7000 vs the 2300 in areas like this, the 2300 would destroy the 7000 all day every day. I`m not a big fan of the 2300 myself because I cannot stand that rear pivot mount, but for going after the small stuff in areas like in the photos my go to detector would be the 2300.

Any way all the best mate and well done on the gold. It`s always good to see 🙂

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I m always baffled by the tiny pieces.............

 

RR

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Good Job busting rock and getting those nice bits JW.

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7 hours ago, Rivers rat said:

I m always baffled by the tiny pieces.............

 

RR

Why? 

JW :smile:

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8 hours ago, phoenix said:

Hey JW.  It`s always good to see the gold you get but something I`ve wondered a few times.  I know you`re not a big fan of the 2300 and  I think I read a couple of months ago you still own it.    Have you ever tried your 23 for detecting places like the bedrock in these photos?    My experience with the 7000 vs the 2300 in areas like this, the 2300 would destroy the 7000 all day every day. I`m not a big fan of the 2300 myself because I cannot stand that rear pivot mount, but for going after the small stuff in areas like in the photos my go to detector would be the 2300.

Any way all the best mate and well done on the gold. It`s always good to see 🙂

Thanks Dave. Tell you what mate....just for you I will take the 2300 to this spot & give it a run. These days I mostly use the EQ 800, GB2 or the Gold Monster for this tiny bedrock surface stuff. Most of the gold I have found with the 2300 was on this type of ground. Very shallow, exposed bedrock. But on going back over it with the GB2 I got gold the 2300 didn't. Back in the day when I was using the 2300 in conjunction with my 4500 & sadie coil. The 4500 blitzed it for gold & at a bit of depth to. That is what shocked me. The 2300 didn't see half of it until quite a bit of dirt was taken off. I was able to run the 2300 flat out & the 4500 pretty flat out too. Bering in mind  that the sadie is a smaller coil than the 2300's 8" round. So the 8" round should have detected deeper. I now believe that the fact I can run my detectors right up at the top end due to our insanely mild ground has taken away the advantage the 2300 has in your much higher mineralised ground.

Here is a brand new untried 2300 alongside the 4500/sadie

090

I went detecting at this spot with the 4500 first, marking all signals I got with orange dazzle paint. Over a 2.5 hour period I got 22 signals. Here are some of the first few. I did scuff the ground with my boot before I put the spot of paint on the ground.

094

I then fired up the 2300 & went over the same ground. Getting no further signals I then hit the paint spots with the 2300. It picked up on some but less than half of them. This surprised me. So I dug the signals that the 2300 did get.

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Close up. Notice that the gold is rough reef gold & with quartz.

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From the above dig got this piece. Was the biggest bit for the 2300. I would like to draw your attention at how reasonably shallow the 2300 gold pieces were.

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Ok. So the next lot of pics are what the 2300 didn't hit on from the surface so if I was just using the 2300 I would not have got any of the following signals. I dug them running the 4500 again. The first few I just scraped a bit of dirt off & then tried the 2300 to see at what stage it picked up a signal. I was shocked at how deep on some of them I had to go before it got a hit. So much so that after the first few I didn't even bother comparing the 2300 on the depth to save time in digging the targets. I again would like to draw your attention to how much deeper the 4500/sadie signals were. And how much bigger the gold was compared to what the 2300 hit on. Not forgetting that all the signals were first got with the 4500/sadie.

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Notice to how worn down the pick is.

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This was all from one patch area in an afternoon. The gold at the top was what the 2300 didn't hit on from the surface. The bottom row is what the 2300 did get. Again, all signals were got first with the 4500/sadie.

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The gold is rough reef gold which is what the 2300 is supposed to be very good at & why I chose this location. This was my 2300's maiden voyage but by no means its last. But I was not impressed to say the least. Cheers

JW :smile:

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6 hours ago, kiwijw said:

Back in the day when I was using the 2300 in conjunction with my 4500 & sadie coil. The 4500 blitzed it for gold & at a bit of depth to. That is what shocked me. The 2300 didn't see half of it until quite a bit of dirt was taken off. I was able to run the 2300 flat out & the 4500 pretty flat out too. Bering in mind  that the sadie is a smaller coil than the 2300's 8" round.

Do you know the voltages that these two detectors operate at?  Could that be part of the explanation?  Also, the Nugget Finder Sadie has a lofty reputation (and some of that comes from you, JW!).  Could there be enough difference in coils to explain some of the difference in performance?

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7 hours ago, kiwijw said:

Thanks Dave. Tell you what mate....just for you I will take the 2300 to this spot & give it a run. These days I mostly use the EQ 800, GB2 or the Gold Monster for this tiny bedrock surface stuff. Most of the gold I have found with the 2300 was on this type of ground. Very shallow, exposed bedrock. But on going back over it with the GB2 I got gold the 2300 didn't. Back in the day when I was using the 2300 in conjunction with my 4500 & sadie coil. The 4500 blitzed it for gold & at a bit of depth to. That is what shocked me. The 2300 didn't see half of it until quite a bit of dirt was taken off. I was able to run the 2300 flat out & the 4500 pretty flat out too. Bering in mind  that the sadie is a smaller coil than the 2300's 8" round. So the 8" round should have detected deeper. I now believe that the fact I can run my detectors right up at the top end due to our insanely mild ground has taken away the advantage the 2300 has in your much higher mineralised ground.

Here is a brand new untried 2300 alongside the 4500/sadie

090

I went detecting at this spot with the 4500 first, marking all signals I got with orange dazzle paint. Over a 2.5 hour period I got 22 signals. Here are some of the first few. I did scuff the ground with my boot before I put the spot of paint on the ground.

094

I then fired up the 2300 & went over the same ground. Getting no further signals I then hit the paint spots with the 2300. It picked up on some but less than half of them. This surprised me. So I dug the signals that the 2300 did get.

092

Close up. Notice that the gold is rough reef gold & with quartz.

093

 

095

 

096

 

097

 

098

 

099

From the above dig got this piece. Was the biggest bit for the 2300. I would like to draw your attention at how reasonably shallow the 2300 gold pieces were.

100

 

102

 

101

Ok. So the next lot of pics are what the 2300 didn't hit on from the surface so if I was just using the 2300 I would not have got any of the following signals. I dug them running the 4500 again. The first few I just scraped a bit of dirt off & then tried the 2300 to see at what stage it picked up a signal. I was shocked at how deep on some of them I had to go before it got a hit. So much so that after the first few I didn't even bother comparing the 2300 on the depth to save time in digging the targets. I again would like to draw your attention to how much deeper the 4500/sadie signals were. And how much bigger the gold was compared to what the 2300 hit on. Not forgetting that all the signals were first got with the 4500/sadie.

103

 

104

 

105

 

107

Notice to how worn down the pick is.

109

 

110

 

111

 

112

 

116

 

117

 

118

 

119

 

161

 

162

 

121

 

122

This was all from one patch area in an afternoon. The gold at the top was what the 2300 didn't hit on from the surface. The bottom row is what the 2300 did get. Again, all signals were got first with the 4500/sadie.

126

 

124

The gold is rough reef gold which is what the 2300 is supposed to be very good at & why I chose this location. This was my 2300's maiden voyage but by no means its last. But I was not impressed to say the least. Cheers

JW :smile:

JW, I'm out of likes again . . . over the limit, but I wanted you to know how much I enjoyed your comparison and contrast piece on these two detectors, very illuminating to say the least.

I can't imagine what it would be like chasing the gold in mild ground like you have in NZ, something quite foreign to me (no pun intended), as moderate to extreme conditions are what I usually deal with while hunting nuggets.

Again, you've excelled with your layout of pictures, storyline, and text blocks, nicely done indeed, and a pleasure to view.

All the best,

Lanny

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