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Tometusns

High Number War Nickel

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1 hour ago, Tometusns said:

I don't know if the mint makes the planchet or they have a company make them.

Pretty sure the mint buys the sheet metal and then cuts them into planchets (discs).  At least that is what they were doing back during the war.

1 hour ago, Tometusns said:

But either way it's obvious there are variances in the mix.

That is one theory, and a good one.  But there are other hypotheses.  For example, can being in the ground leach out enough molydenum to raise the TID?  What we really need is someone to show that an uncirculated Warnick has a high (in the 20's on an Equinox) TID.  Then I'm convinced it has nothing to do with the coin having been in the ground.

 

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46 minutes ago, GB_Amateur said:

Pretty sure the mint buys the sheet metal and then cuts them into planchets (discs).  At least that is what they were doing back during the war.

That is one theory, and a good one.  But there are other hypotheses.  For example, can being in the ground leach out enough molydenum to raise the TID?  What we really need is someone to show that an uncirculated Warnick has a high (in the 20's on an Equinox) TID.  Then I'm convinced it has nothing to do with the coin having been in the ground.

 

Good point GB. I was wondering the same. When I air test a coin I get different depths than when it’s buried. I know that may not be relative but I’m just saying the ground seems to have an effect on the coins readings.

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Everyone also needs to realize that while the TID is related to metallic composition it is not necessarily directly measuring metallic composition of the target, there are other effects that influence the phase angle (delay in the received induced mangetic return signal) that is measured by the detector.  So, especially, with mixed metal alloys, corrosion, and other influences it is hard to really say what is causing the variation.  I think GB is right, that a sampling of non-corroded war nickels is what is needed to at least see if metal composition variances are the main cause.  I think it also makes sense to do that check in single frequency to rule out multi-frequency processing artifacts and get a simple return off a single frequency transmit signal.  Interesting topic.

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I found 2 war nickels a foot apart from each other. 1943 rang up 13-14. 1945 rang up a steady 16. Almost didn't dig the 1945 because I had dug about 15 pull tabs before I found the nickels.

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19 hours ago, steveg said:

Tometusns -- very interesting!  You found one of these "deviants," LOL!  It is really interesting that these turn up, every so often.  Still a mystery that I have had little luck solving...

In any case, NICE DIG?

Steve 

Thanks Steve! Finding that nickel was pretty special to me. I read about them but really never dreamed of finding one. 

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Finally found a high VDI war nickel on 4/17/19.  This one reads 20 on the Nox in mulit-frequency park 1.  Another high reading San Francisco mint nickel.

 

In single frequencies this silver war nickel reads:

  • 5Khz = 14 to 20 VDI  (jumpy)
  • 10Khz = 20 VDI
  • 15Khz = 20 VDI
  • 20Khz = 20 VDI
  • 40Khz = 22 VDI

 

War Nickel 20 VDI.jpg

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I dug one a couple of weeks ago, that was an 18/19 in the ground, and a solid "18" above ground, in an air test.  Thought I was digging a deep Indian.  Also an "S" mint mark...

 

Steve

4-4-19Finds.JPG

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I've got a couple rolls of un-dug War nickels and can't find any that read high. High reading war nickels must be fairly few and far between.   

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I've only been detecting for a couple years and I've only found 5 war nickels total (just one with my recently acquired EQ800), but I've found their VDIs to be quite interesting. The first four that I found were with Garrett machines: the first one was in a coin spill so the numbers were naturally skewed, but the second and third each came up alone (and I mainly dug them because I got enough of a high tone from an iffy, deep signal to encourage me to dig on the assumption that I had a copper penny or a dime), and the fourth was the only war nickel I ever dug that was a solid "true" nickel tone all the way around the target (but it was shallow at only 2" down). Because of my experience with the other 3 war nickels reading high, I was at the point that I believed all war nickels read higher because of the silver content. But after the fourth one read "normal", I air tested each of my war nickels and was surprised to learn that despite the high tone component of my second and third war nickels in the ground, all of these four war nickels read in the "normal" nickel range out of the ground.  I definitely rescanned all of my previous holes, so there's no doubt in my mind that there wasn't a missed target on the lone nickels.

My fifth war nickel was found with the EQ800, and it's my only war nickel that was a solid 21 both in and out of the ground - it's a 1945 P, so it isn't just the San Fran mint that has the occasional high nickel - Philadelphia apparently had some as well.  Rescanning my other four war nickels with the EQ, I get a solid 13 for all of them (two 1943P, a 1944P, and a different 1945P).

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Found a ‘43 P war nickel this morning. It rang up 14/15, what has usually been pull ring numbers in other sites. I dug this one because the site doesn’t have a lot of modern trash, so the odds of getting a pull tab was low. Now I wonder how many of the 14/15 targets I passed up were war nickels!

FCA401FF-5A51-4AF6-AF65-FB89FBA807A3.jpeg

01BD4D40-F6EC-4A53-91F6-A6A9CE145396.jpeg

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