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Interesting looking coin with that butterfly. Too bad theres no gold in the river...i would be down there with my fly rod. I had to run the nox at a sens of about 17 the other day as i was in a metropolitan area cars everywhere and powerlines 20 feet away. My ctx does not suffer as badley from the emi but its not as effective in a high trash environment as the nox. Its great your discovering the different naunces with the different detectors. A guy with a Garret Ace found a 1854 silver quarter just the other day in an area that has been pounded to death with the ctx, xp deus and nox... you got me wondering what coil he was using lol

Strick

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10 hours ago, strick said:

Interesting looking coin with that butterfly.

?:laugh:

It's not a butterfly, although I can see how you think it is, it does look like one now that you mention it, it's a Maori carved head or 'koruru'.

thomas-hansen-mask.jpg

I find it very interesting how deep the Ace detectors are and they do appear to love silver coins.  You should try find out what coil he was using, I am guessing the Tornado, it seems the popular combination for the Aces, especially in the UK.

The river behind me has trout and salmon, it and others nearby are considered some of the best fly rivers in the world.  My towns main tourism attraction is for fly fishers.

Next time I find a deep target like that using the Euroace I am going to try mess around a bit with the Equinox to see if I can get it, lowering the recovery speed and changing out of Park 1.  I am sure the Nox can hit on them but maybe not in default Park 1 settings.  The Ace had the advantage of the bigger coil too.

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Hi Simon… thanks for the quality photos that so aptly illustrate the accompanying text, and congratulations on the interesting coin recovery too!!! WTG!!! :cool:

With the outstanding silver coin detection depth referred to above, and of course this transitional coin find, the Garrett Euroace equipped with the Nel Tornado coil seems to work quite well in your soils. I think we can attribute that result primarily to your mild ferromagnetic soil minerals, and generally that the Euroace is specifically designed as a coin hunter. The 8.25 kHz operating frequency is advantageous for electromagnetic field (EMF) soil mineral penetration compared to mid-to-high operating frequency VLF units.

I haven’t checked but if memory serves, the Euroace has a fixed ground balance compensation point but I stand to be corrected on that point. In more severe soils, a fixed ground balance compensation point would certainly hinder detection of deeper targets. This is because we need to be able to adjust and maintain the GB compensation point precisely when operating over more elevated magnetic susceptible iron minerals. There is little or no GB adjustment latitude when detecting over severe ferromagnetic minerals compared to mild soil minerals.

The 12”X 13” Tornado coil would certainly add detection depth compared to the stock coil when used over such mild ground. In the tough ferromagnetic substrates where we prospect for silver, a larger coil on a prospecting-capable VLF unit would not add any significant detection depth. This is precisely why we employ PI units with larger coils to access deeper targets where minimal amounts of ferrous trash permit their advantageous use.

On a different note, a continual theme on the various forums is about the value of our finds. You’ve mentioned above about the minimal monetary value of the transitional coin recently found with your Euroace. You pointed out  that it has value to you for other reasons. 

The coins in the photo below have very little monetary value, and that is true of most of the coins that I find. But coin hunting at the picnic grove was fun, and certainly better than hanging around the house,  and there was a feeling of accomplishment because each was found through my own efforts. I think that is what matters most to me, regardless whether our interest in coins is historical, monetary, or aesthetical.......................Jim.

20190318_225630.jpg.0a025ae9b0c37198ae8cccf970e9d865.jpg

 

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9 hours ago, phrunt said:

?:laugh:

It's not a butterfly, although I can see how you think it is, it does look like one now that you mention it, it's a Maori carved head or 'koruru'.

Next time I find a deep target like that using the Euroace I am going to try mess around a bit with the Equinox to see if I can get it, lowering the recovery speed and changing out of Park 1.  I am sure the Nox can hit on them but maybe not in default Park 1 settings.  The Ace had the advantage of the bigger coil too.

LOL I saw the face too and thought maybe it had a double meaning...guess I'm still confused  after finding that sun god thingy..try Field 2, Iron bias 0, recovery speed 5,  manual ground balance and run the sens as high as you can..

strick

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4 hours ago, Jim Hemmingway said:

Hi Simon… thanks for the quality photos that so aptly illustrate the accompanying text, and congratulations on the interesting coin recovery too!!! WTG!!! :cool:

With the outstanding silver coin detection depth referred to above, and of course this transitional coin find, the Garrett Euroace equipped with the Nel Tornado coil seems to work quite well in your soils. I think we can attribute that result primarily to your mild ferromagnetic soil minerals, and generally that the Euroace is specifically designed as a coin hunter. The 8.25 kHz operating frequency is advantageous for electromagnetic field (EMF) soil mineral penetration compared to mid-to-high operating frequency VLF units.

Hi Jim, glad to see you posting again, I hope your computer troubles are resolved.

You're right about the Ace, it's a fixed ground balance unit and seems to really like our mild soils, I'm sure if in a different environment the results would be very different.  It might well be why the Ace detectors are quite popular in Europe due to their mild soils also.  They were so popular there Garrett made a special European version of the Ace, The Euroace setup for European coinage.

I have noticed on my T2 if I forget to ground balance it when I use it on coins the Target ID's are very off, after a ground balance they become much better.  This clearly shows me how much better a unit runs balanced to the soil type.  I guess the balance the Euroace is set to is just about right for the soil type here.

I was contemplating not even doing a post about those finds, they were nothing overly special to anybody but myself, however the idea of the post was to show the advantages of situations where EMI is normally present and taking advantage of a small window of time when EMI was gone. 

I am very happy with the Nel Tornado, It's results are similar to the Detech Ultimate, I'd like to compare the two coils on the same detector but that's not going to happen, I don't intend to buy anymore coils for the Ace or the Gold Bug as they're not my primary detectors.

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Land like that I would have to drag my flyrod along with the detector! Makes me feel like a seagull at a dump with the areas I poke through ?

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      and the little guy

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