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I find nails too.😐

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Awesome read, now I guess I have to search some old areas all over again and get an idea of what might had been there!

Guess ill scout by looking for small iron first than get an idea of the area to pick through. Some old foundations near me that have been picked through but there were older buildings that were taken down way before the better documented structures.

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If you Google hand made nails there is a old video showing how the nails were made.

Stick.

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Thanks for the post- I enjoyed reading that.

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On 4/12/2019 at 6:51 AM, Mark Gillespie said:

 

Cutting the nails leaves a small burr along the edge as the metal is sheared. By carefully examining the edges for evidence of these burrs, it is possible to distinguish between the earlier type A nails and the later type B nails. Type A nails have burrs on the diagonally opposite edges, while the type B nails have both burrs on the same side because the metal was flipped for each stroke. nail.jpg

If I'm understanding correctly wouldn't it be the other way around? Both burrs on the same side on type a since it wasn't flipped?

Interesting read.

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