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steveg

A Variety Of Equinox Digs, From A Recent Trip Home To Western Pa

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Nice!  Looks like you were discriminating high since I don't see any nickels.  You do realize that not all Warnicks are up in the 20's?  (Ok, couldn't help myself.  ?)  Really nice looking Franklin; I'm envious.  The large cent appears to be in pretty good shape given that it's been in the ground for the better part of 2 centuries.  Any of the Wheaties have dates+MM worth mentioning?  What are the dates+MM on the silver dimes -- I couldn't quite make them out.  I'll guess 21-D and 55 (plain).  I'm an optimist!

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GB_Amateur, 

I wasn't "discriminating" high tones with the machine; I run wide open.  But -- at the site I spent the most time at (the 1872 farmhouse), we hunted mostly the nicely manicured yard, and I didn't want to dig any more holes than I needed to, so there was a bit of "discrimination" applied with my ears, due to that.  

IF I showed some of the mid-tone junk dug at the foundation sites, however (including more than my share of shotgun-shell brass, from one of them, LOL), you'd have seen that I "turned off" the "mental discriminator!" LOL! I just didn't happen upon any nickels at those foundation sites (war nickels, or otherwise, LOL!)

Yes, I was pleased with the condition of the large cent!  I was really hoping to dig one on that trip, as there's virtually no chance I can dig them here in Oklahoma, at 99.9% of the sites I have access to.  The state is simply "too young," unless you are hunting an old military installation.  

The Merc is a 1934, and the Rosie a '53, both Philadelphia coins.  NO, the Merc is not a '21-D, LOL!  That would've been nice!  ?  But, what's this about the 1955 Rosie?  Not familiar with that one...

Nothing noteworthy with the wheats; most are so toasted, in this case, that it wouldn't matter, anyway.  Same with the Indians, except for the fatty, which is special to me because it's the first I've ever dug...

The Franklin was a total surprise; it came in the dark, on the border between my Mom's yard, and the old farmhouse on our property.  I was outside with my young niece and nephew, who begged me to "take them metal detecting," and so we went outside for a bit, at dusk, so I could dig them a few shell casings or some shotgun-shell brass that I knew would fascinate and appease them, LOL!  We hit the farmhouse yard for a bit, and I as expected I got them a few casings and brass (I've pretty much cleaned out the old coins from that yard).  After I dug the "last target for today," so I told them, with their hands happily full of old ammunition, LOL, we were walking back to my Mom's house, but I hadn't shut the machine off yet -- just swinging haphazardly as I walked.  But then, I hit a sweet 34/35 high tone, that stopped me in my tracks, and I said to them "I know I said I wasn't digging any more, but I HAVE to dig this one."  LOL!  Boy am I glad I did, and you can't imagine how surprised all three of us were to see "big silver" in the hole!


Steve

 

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4 hours ago, steveg said:

...What's this about the 1955 Rosie?

I thought I could see the 3rd digit (5) but not the 4th.  Although Roosevelt dimes have been minted for 74 years now, you can safely ignore anything in the clad era (1965 onward) as being collectible.  Thus only 19 years have any chance of scarcity.  For circulated coins (what we find with our detectors) anyway, all three of the 1955's are the scarcest, and the Philly minted ones tops in the series.  It tends to be unusual that a Philadelphia minted coin beats the branch mints, at least in the last 100 years.  1955 was an unusual year in that every denomination had at least one scarce coin:  1955-S penny, 1955 nickel, all three dimes, 1955-D quarter, and 1955 half dollar.  Come to think of it, that would be one heck of a collection of metal detector finds -- one of every minted 1955 coin.  I bet you could count on two hands the number of detectorists who could claim finding that sequence.

Neat story about your niece and nephew being excited with your hunting.  Reminds me of when my uncles got me into coin collecting at the age of 6.  And half dollars -- those bring back memories.  I can't recall the last time I got one in change, but probably 25+ years ago.  Silver halves, now it's 50 years and counting.  Thanks for posting and sharing.  If we can't be out finding treasure ourselves at least we can enjoy what others are recovering.

 

 

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Nice finds!!  Had to be a fun hunt.

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GB_Amateur -- thanks for the info on the 1955 coins!  I didn't know those specifics!  I appreciate the education!

Yes, it was a good time with my niece and nephew!  They love to tag along with "uncle Steve," and are fascinated with detecting!  My little niece told me, after I dug the Franklin, that "this was her best detecting day ever!"  LOL!

Thanks, groundscanner.  Definitely a good time!

Steve

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12 hours ago, GB_Amateur said:

...(In regards to Roosevelt dimes) all three of the 1955's are the scarcest....

I said that from memory but thought I'd better check the numbers.  Redbook says "not quite."  Here are the order and mintages (for Roosies):

1955 (plain) -- 12.8 million

1949-S -- 13.5 million

1955-D -- 14.0 million

1955-S -- 18.5 million

1954-S -- 22.0 million

1949-D -- 26.0 million

1946-S -- 27.9 million

So the 1949-S snuck in there at 2nd place.  Note the 1955 (plain) is the only one of the top seven from the Philadelphia mint.  That is typical for first half of 20th century US coinage -- more coins minted in Philly than either branch mint.  (Starting in the 1950's the Denver mint replaced Philly as the most proficient.)  Even during the 19th century the Philadelphia and New Orleans mints were typically far more productive than San Francisco and Carson City (not to mention gold coins from Charlotte and Dahlonega).  This is why the Western detectorists have an edge, IMO, in finding valuable coins.  The East coast has the oldest coins but typically not the rarest.

 

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Very interesting, GB; thanks for that additional info!  And yes, unless we "easterners" are digging coins from the Charlotte or Dahlonega, the westerners (especially with respect to the CC minted coins) are more likely to find rare ones...

 

Steve

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Sweet hunt!!

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