Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
steveg

A Variety Of Equinox Digs, From A Recent Trip Home To Western Pa

Recommended Posts


Nice!  Looks like you were discriminating high since I don't see any nickels.  You do realize that not all Warnicks are up in the 20's?  (Ok, couldn't help myself.  😁)  Really nice looking Franklin; I'm envious.  The large cent appears to be in pretty good shape given that it's been in the ground for the better part of 2 centuries.  Any of the Wheaties have dates+MM worth mentioning?  What are the dates+MM on the silver dimes -- I couldn't quite make them out.  I'll guess 21-D and 55 (plain).  I'm an optimist!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

GB_Amateur, 

I wasn't "discriminating" high tones with the machine; I run wide open.  But -- at the site I spent the most time at (the 1872 farmhouse), we hunted mostly the nicely manicured yard, and I didn't want to dig any more holes than I needed to, so there was a bit of "discrimination" applied with my ears, due to that.  

IF I showed some of the mid-tone junk dug at the foundation sites, however (including more than my share of shotgun-shell brass, from one of them, LOL), you'd have seen that I "turned off" the "mental discriminator!" LOL! I just didn't happen upon any nickels at those foundation sites (war nickels, or otherwise, LOL!)

Yes, I was pleased with the condition of the large cent!  I was really hoping to dig one on that trip, as there's virtually no chance I can dig them here in Oklahoma, at 99.9% of the sites I have access to.  The state is simply "too young," unless you are hunting an old military installation.  

The Merc is a 1934, and the Rosie a '53, both Philadelphia coins.  NO, the Merc is not a '21-D, LOL!  That would've been nice!  🙂  But, what's this about the 1955 Rosie?  Not familiar with that one...

Nothing noteworthy with the wheats; most are so toasted, in this case, that it wouldn't matter, anyway.  Same with the Indians, except for the fatty, which is special to me because it's the first I've ever dug...

The Franklin was a total surprise; it came in the dark, on the border between my Mom's yard, and the old farmhouse on our property.  I was outside with my young niece and nephew, who begged me to "take them metal detecting," and so we went outside for a bit, at dusk, so I could dig them a few shell casings or some shotgun-shell brass that I knew would fascinate and appease them, LOL!  We hit the farmhouse yard for a bit, and I as expected I got them a few casings and brass (I've pretty much cleaned out the old coins from that yard).  After I dug the "last target for today," so I told them, with their hands happily full of old ammunition, LOL, we were walking back to my Mom's house, but I hadn't shut the machine off yet -- just swinging haphazardly as I walked.  But then, I hit a sweet 34/35 high tone, that stopped me in my tracks, and I said to them "I know I said I wasn't digging any more, but I HAVE to dig this one."  LOL!  Boy am I glad I did, and you can't imagine how surprised all three of us were to see "big silver" in the hole!


Steve

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, steveg said:

...What's this about the 1955 Rosie?

I thought I could see the 3rd digit (5) but not the 4th.  Although Roosevelt dimes have been minted for 74 years now, you can safely ignore anything in the clad era (1965 onward) as being collectible.  Thus only 19 years have any chance of scarcity.  For circulated coins (what we find with our detectors) anyway, all three of the 1955's are the scarcest, and the Philly minted ones tops in the series.  It tends to be unusual that a Philadelphia minted coin beats the branch mints, at least in the last 100 years.  1955 was an unusual year in that every denomination had at least one scarce coin:  1955-S penny, 1955 nickel, all three dimes, 1955-D quarter, and 1955 half dollar.  Come to think of it, that would be one heck of a collection of metal detector finds -- one of every minted 1955 coin.  I bet you could count on two hands the number of detectorists who could claim finding that sequence.

Neat story about your niece and nephew being excited with your hunting.  Reminds me of when my uncles got me into coin collecting at the age of 6.  And half dollars -- those bring back memories.  I can't recall the last time I got one in change, but probably 25+ years ago.  Silver halves, now it's 50 years and counting.  Thanks for posting and sharing.  If we can't be out finding treasure ourselves at least we can enjoy what others are recovering.

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice finds!!  Had to be a fun hunt.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

GB_Amateur -- thanks for the info on the 1955 coins!  I didn't know those specifics!  I appreciate the education!

Yes, it was a good time with my niece and nephew!  They love to tag along with "uncle Steve," and are fascinated with detecting!  My little niece told me, after I dug the Franklin, that "this was her best detecting day ever!"  LOL!

Thanks, groundscanner.  Definitely a good time!

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, GB_Amateur said:

...(In regards to Roosevelt dimes) all three of the 1955's are the scarcest....

I said that from memory but thought I'd better check the numbers.  Redbook says "not quite."  Here are the order and mintages (for Roosies):

1955 (plain) -- 12.8 million

1949-S -- 13.5 million

1955-D -- 14.0 million

1955-S -- 18.5 million

1954-S -- 22.0 million

1949-D -- 26.0 million

1946-S -- 27.9 million

So the 1949-S snuck in there at 2nd place.  Note the 1955 (plain) is the only one of the top seven from the Philadelphia mint.  That is typical for first half of 20th century US coinage -- more coins minted in Philly than either branch mint.  (Starting in the 1950's the Denver mint replaced Philly as the most proficient.)  Even during the 19th century the Philadelphia and New Orleans mints were typically far more productive than San Francisco and Carson City (not to mention gold coins from Charlotte and Dahlonega).  This is why the Western detectorists have an edge, IMO, in finding valuable coins.  The East coast has the oldest coins but typically not the rarest.

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very interesting, GB; thanks for that additional info!  And yes, unless we "easterners" are digging coins from the Charlotte or Dahlonega, the westerners (especially with respect to the CC minted coins) are more likely to find rare ones...

 

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sweet hunt!!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By Againstmywill
      The large coin/token was found at a school. It is the same exact coin as the smaller one that is next to it in the picture, just bigger and a couple bundles of grain, maybe (see red arrows). The small coin is a real Chinese coin that I have at home. Question is, what is the larger one? Anyone have any ideas? A good luck charm came to mind, but I could not find any just like it. Thanks for any help.



    • By Dan(NM)
      Met up with a couple of fellow hunters to hunt a WW1/WW2 dump site, it was a button feast today. Also was able to score 2 mercs, a barber and a wheat. Overall a great way to celebrate Independence Day, thanks for looking.

    • By kac
      Went to one of my stomping grounds to try out my AT Pro with -5 clicks on GB and noticed the town had done some trimming revealing areas that weren't usually accessible. After an hour in just a small area I got these. The -5 on the Pro gave me more stable vdi numbers, the coins were pretty shallow <8" deep tangled in roots.
      The copper coin has so much patina on it that I can barely see a face of some sorts. Thinking of sending it out for professional cleanup.

    • By Steve Herschbach
      Anybody tried it?
      Metal Detecting In The River for Treasure
      Aug 13, 2017 - Uploaded by Aquachigger Join me as I metal detect and search for treasure in the river. I find a nice Confederate artillery shell and other ...       Metal detecting a river full of silver and gold (part 1)
      Aug 13, 2016 - Uploaded by hiluxyota Went out today with Dirty Dan to a new river site , and we both left today with over 30 silver coins , gold and ...       Metal Detecting In Rivers: Tips On Finding Crossings Or Fords
      Dec 16, 2012 - Uploaded by Aquachigger A little metal detecting adventure. In it, I give out some tips on ...       Exploring an Island and Metal Detecting along the River
      Feb 21, 2017 - Uploaded by nuggetnoggin Nugget Noggin paddles out on the river to explore an island, where many people have camped out over the ...  
    • By Gerry in Idaho
      Silver & Gold at its best.  I can not believe the finds some of my customers are making with their Equinox detectors.  This is the 5th gold coin (I'm only counting in US finds, not England) my customers have recovered with the NOX machines.  Brandon in UT, finds an old site and recovers a couple beautiful Seated Liberty Dimes (see pictures).  Then the following weekend (this last Saturday) he goes back to the same site and does the Holy Grail we all dream of. Yes he unearths a glimmering gorgeous 1886-S $5 Eagle.  
      I've been a dealer for 25 years and never before have I had so many happy customers making Top Quality Finds.  All I can say, is the Equinox and the Multi IQ Technology has to have something to do with all the treasures coming up.





    • By Rivers rat
      Hello went back to the spot of my latest trench and decided to dig one longer,i left markers last week which were still there on thursday but were gone on Saturday ...........so i left some this time heavy enough that u need a bit of strength to move those rock.......I was equipped with the 9"HF 1 spade ,1 pickaxe and 1 Hodan pick.Weather was ok not too hot.
      The pickaxe really helped to loosen the compacted gravel,and i think with a bit of practice i will getter better at it.I detected the spoil once out ,and it was very easy with the deus to switch 
      on and off.
       
      So i found:
      -1 Rose farthing
      -1 Nuremberg token
      -1 beautiful button from the 4th regiment of the East  India Company
      -1 roman coin
      -1 strap of some sort probably medieval.
       
      I did found anything while refilling the trench(which is good) and i more than happy with the result as i still got 100s of trench to do on that spot but also i am the only one allowed as most of the license holders are scrapping only🍌.I also found a pretty long clay pipe
       
      Enjoy the work out 
       
      RR




×
×
  • Create New...