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  1. According to the Serial Register page Section 19 is split estate. The surface is BLM managed and the minerals are privately owned. This doesn't make a lot of sense considering the ownership history there but it is how the government has the split estate classified. To prospect or mine Section 19 you would need the written permission of the private mineral owner. You will need to visit the Humboldt County Assessor to find out who the current owner is. One individual and one company have mined that area in the past. The last approved mining there was closed out in 1998. There may be a private mineral lease there now but there is no way to know until someone begins the mine permit process. The one thing that is clear is that there can be no prospecting (including metal detecting) or mining on Section 19 without the mineral owners written permission.
    4 points
  2. Okay Barry, it seems that the courts have ammended the common laws of property to decide meteorite ownership cases, but it is certain that the federal government has asserted that a meteorite does not qualify as a “valuable mineral” as defined under the 1872 Mining Law. So I would now have to say that the legality of collecting meteorites on federal land containing a mineral claim would have to ultimately be decided by the courts. I for one would approach the claim owner beforehand to avoid any misunderstandings.
    3 points
  3. The 2300 IS the smaller coil for the Zed....
    3 points
  4. I now use the Master Title Plat because this is the document that the BLM uses to keep track of land status. Clay Diggins is far more knowledgeable than me and he will weigh in again I bet Mitchel. You bring up great points that do need further discussion. The Master Title Plat for T32N R32E is here: We can see that Section 19 has Restricted Minerals as do the other odd-numbered sections. I'll ask that Clay Diggins perhaps explain this in his way because he is so good at it. Bottom line is many of us expend a lot of time and money to locate and maintain our Rye Patch claims. We have to protect what is lawfully ours and I'm glad we are having this discussion. We have plans to scrape down a couple feet in areas that have never been scraped. We never prospect anywhere but where we know our prospecting is right by the mining laws. This has been educational for all of us. In the end we'll all be on the same page and we need to mentor others on the correct way to prospect. Many thanks.
    3 points
  5. Research, research, research, My memory has been shaken into action by the events of the last few days here. Many details had escaped me about my many trips to Rye Patch since 2011. (Most of the gold was already gone by then also according to my sources. Most is of course a relative term!) I'm not going to go much into the gold but address the odd numbered sections to try and get to the 'bottom of this' once and for all if possible. My primary reason for wanting to go to Rye Patch the first time was because of Chris Ralph's web pages. They are still a good read: http://nevada-outback-gems.com/prospecting_info/majuba_mtns.htm In those pages he says: Property ownership of the area is split between BLM land and private railroad land. The even numbered sections are BLM land and the odd numbered sections are private (originally Railroad Property), even though the surface rights on those odd numbered sections in this area belong to the BLM. There are a number of claims on the BLM property, so investigation into land status is necessary - be sure to check before prospecting and stay off private claims. That seems to be our last understanding here although I would quibble with the wording of the odd numbered sections being called private considering many of the normal private surface rights of land have been conveyed to the BLM. This is not the same private land in other odd number sections if you get my drift. Last year I participated in a Rye Patch thread on another forum. On the third page of that forum thread it got around to land ownership as a result of an inquiry of Clay (Barry). There was some confusion about the requested search and you can read about it here: http://nuggetshooter.ipbhost.com/topic/29744-rye-patch/?page=3 A conclusion that relates to our discussion here about sections 17 and 19 (probably 21 also) are: The odd numbered sections in the Majuba were reconveyed to the US in 1960, including the minerals. They no longer belong to the railroads they are public land. Reconveyed lands are not open to location so no claims can be made there. The odd numbered sections in Township 32N 31E to the west of the Majuba are still private land. So now I have 3 dates of 1934, 1960 and 1961 for possible reconveyance. If this statement is correct then my statement is also correct when I said there is no private land in 32N 32E. Later in the thread Wes says: Pretty sure the mineral rights on section 17-19 in 32 N 32E, and some other odd sections around there, are owned by Newmont mining. Someone had it leased from them awhile back. Thats why they were allowed to do all the mechanized work as seen on the cover of the journal. I'll grant that the odd sections have been confusing for many years, long before I ever heard of Rye Patch or the Majuba Placers. Many, many old timers worked that land with metal detectors and more. I don't know what enforcement actions have taken place but I do know when I first saw 17 in 2011 there were huge holes all over it. Sometime in the last 2-3 years it has been rehabilitated to a large degree. Maybe some of you have pictures of what the old 'burn barrel' area looked like from before 2010. I welcome you to give more clarity to these odd sections. Mitchel
    3 points
  6. In anticipation of cold weather dredging I decided to spend some money on new dive gear. I was able to get a great deal on a Bare Pro D6 dry suit off Ebay. Turned out to be an excellent purchase. The suit was brand new with tags still on it and came with a new set of gloves and hood as well for 499 shipped. The size was an extra large short witch is perfect in length and the chest is a 44'' also perfect, but a bit large in the mid section at 35'' witch actually turned out to be a blessing as I was able to wear my heavy Filson wool gear under for some extra warmth. The boots are an xxl size there again I was able to wear two pair of wool socks for a perfect fit. My old suit is a Bare Pro D6 in large regular, bit too long for me but a good fit with out too much under gear on. Had that suit about six years and it is in need of a new neck seal and a good checking over for pinholes. Rite now its more of a wet suit than dry. LOL. I was out dredging last Saturday in the new suit. Fist time in a while I was warm and dry. Pretty excited about that considering the temp was 22 F and the water dam cold. I also purchased a full face mask, instead of going with goggles and a mouth piece. Ended up getting the new OTS Spectrum mask for 399.00 witch is cheap for a full face mask. It comes with out a regulator so you need to supply that, but most any will fit it. I did come to find my cheap Oceanic regulator is not a good cold weather/water dive regulator. I really like this mask a lot but fair warning, OTS claims one size fits most with the double seal, but if you have large face best to try it for fit as I have a small face and I cant see it fitting comfortable on a person that needs a large. As far a my head I wear a 7mm Bare dry hood and 7mm three finger mitts with Kevlar palms for my hands. Here is a pic from Saturday. Sure wish that sunshine could get down in the canyon a little bit. If you look close at the picture you can see steam coming off the river, that water is about 38 Deg. F. I think the air temp was about 18 Deg. F. Stayed nice and warm in the new gear but as I mentioned my regulator was my problem. Keep freezing up in the cold water and cut my dredge time short. I did manage to clear out a yard or so of pay dirt for a total of 1/8 ounce of gold for the day but I was having to surface about every 5 minutes and put my mask in front of the exhaust on the dredge and that was a bit much for me. Funny how you plan really carefully but overlook one item and that negates all the planning. So - I'm in the market for a good cold water regulator any one got suggestion? Heading back to town coming out of Turnagain Pass I snapped a picture of the Chugach Mountains over by Girdwood. Enjoy!
    2 points
  7. Meteorites found on public land actually belong to the Smithsonian Institution as laid out in the meteorite law. Being a meteorite hunter myself, I know there are definitely meteorite laws in the United States, and they have been used in court battles over meteorite ownership disputes. And also: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meteorite_hunter
    2 points
  8. The laws regarding meteorite ownership in the U.S. are very clear, and it has nothing to do with the mineral rights: a meteorite legally belongs to the owner of the land it is found on. So technically on public land that has a mineral claim, one has the right to search for and collect meteorites. But since meteorite law is not common knowledge, trying to convince a claim owner that sees you detecting for meteorites on his gold claim could be problematic! However, there are new BLM rules in place that allow only a certain amount to be collected per person per year. Not only that, but if the collection of meteorites on BLM land is for commercial purposes, i.e., with the intent to sell the meteorites, then a permit must be obtained, the cost of which is set by the local BLM office.
    2 points
  9. I will not only second that but I want to commend everyone who has participated in this thread. I watched as stuff like this can head off on a wrong tangent easily, with accusations, etc. The goal always on this forum is to educate and this thread has turned into a great example of how to go about doing just that. Thank you everyone!
    2 points
  10. It takes a real man and a true prospector to say this on an open forum of peers. You've got my respect Mitchel. Trust me I learn something new every day about mining for gold.
    2 points
  11. This is disturbing to me Mitchel. I made that map and all it shows is who the land manager is and which sections have claims. The simple fact that the BLM is the land manager does not mean the land is open to prospecting or claim. I took the next step for you. I downloaded the Master Title Plat (MTP) for that Township with a click on the Land Status map. The MTP clearly shows that most of the the odd numbered Sections have restricted minerals - as in not yours. So no you can't just look at a simple map and say to yourself "hmmm no claims and it's BLM managed so I'm good to go". The reason this is disturbing to me is myself and others have spent a lot of personal time and money providing free tools and tutorials so the average prospector/researcher can know how to do their legally required Due Diligence before they put boots on the ground. The tools and information are now freely available. Abdicating your personal responsibility to know the land status before you prospect because I provided a map of claimed areas was not the intent of my work. Please don't use Land Matters as an excuse for criminal behavior. Ignorance is never a defense against a prosecution for mineral trespass or mineral theft. The talk here has been of "Claim Jumping". Claim Jumping is the act of trying to steal a mining claim with paperwork and lawyers. Taking minerals from a claim you don't have permission to prospect is highgrading - not Claim Jumping. Higrading in all cases involves the theft of minerals owned by someone else. Apples and Oranges. I get correspondence from a lot of claim owners complaining of higraders. This is not new to mining. Several studies of commercial placer mines have shown that higrading is the biggest threat to a profitable operation. Anyone that has worked for the larger mining companies know they spend a lot of time, money and hours ensuring their minerals are not stolen. Higrading is on every mining companies radar. I often hear excuses like "If the claim isn't marked it's OK to prospect" and the even more common "It's the claim owners responsibility to maintain signs". Neither is true, a few States require corners be checked on an annual basis but in point of fact most states have no legal requirement that claims must maintain markers. In several states corner markers are not required at all for some claims and monuments only have to be present at the time of location. Although as a practical matter the claim owner should do everything possible to put others on notice of the claim it is not the legal responsibility of the claim owner to use signs or markers to keep prospectors off their claim. Prospectors, unlike the general public, have a positive legal duty to know the mineral status of the land before entering to prospect. The claim owner put other prospectors on legal notice when they recorded their "Notice of Mining Claim Location" into the public record. That public record suffices as proper notice under the law even if there are no stakes at the mining claim location. The public record is open for inspection to all people. Potential prospectors need to examine the public record before entering the land to prospect. Land Matters provides links to all the County Recorders right on the Mining Claim maps to assist you in accomplishing that requirement. Where Land Matters could do better is in providing the subsurface mineral status of the lands. As you've seen above not all BLM managed land is open to prospecting or location. It's not just a matter of mineral withdrawals but more subtle issues like those odd numbered sections in parts of Rye Patch that were reconvened and were never open to location. There was no withdrawal there because there were no mineral rights to withdraw. Often those minerals have already been sold or leased. If you are found extracting minerals from these restricted lands the BLM will bring charges of criminal mineral theft. It happens quite often and is frequently prosecuted for something as simple as taking a pickup load of gravel or sand. Then there is the big mass of "dark matter" that is the subsurface estate still owned by the United States. There are nearly 7 million acres of mineral lands, often available for prospecting and location, underneath private lands in the west. Mining companies know this and have legally mined private lands for years. It requires a huge amount of research to determine just where these hidden mineral lands are found. The BLM is tasked with maintaining the records of this huge subsurface estate but between the BLM and mining companies the attitude seems to be "out of sight - out of mind". With very few exceptions these records are available but virtually unobtainable by the average researcher. Land Matters has plans to map these subsurface mineral rights but it's a huge project with little public interest beyond the landsmen and oil and gas industries. We need to see some real public interest before we will commit the resources needed to complete such a big project. Now to the tough part. Most of these complaints I receive of higraders are about metal detecting. Rarely do I hear of processing equipment being used. At least 9 out of 10 reports of higrading I receive are about metal detectorists taking the best and biggest gold. Several of you on this forum have been named by claim owners. I'm not the enforcement guy and I will not be calling you out in public but I do know. For small miners trying to protect their owned minerals from higrading the pointy finger is mostly about metal detectorists. I do know that few of you set out with the intent to detect someone's minerals. In most cases these violations are due to ignorance, intentional or otherwise. Assuming that signs are required or that unclaimed BLM managed land must be available for prospecting are just two examples. I have heard from many prospectors that the big mining companies (or someone who appears to be working for a mining company) allow prospectors to work their claims. I've never found a prospector who had a name, phone number or signed release but this seems to be one of those things "everyone knows". I can tell you that no mining company that has public shares could ever legally allow you to prospect their claims without a work contract. The simple fact that you haven't been caught or run off does not amount to permission. Please learn to do your own due diligence. Please respect mineral owners rights, those minerals are their private property under the law. With a little luck and hard work you could own a good deposit yourself. Barry
    2 points
  12. From http://www.minelab.com/customer-care/product-notices?article=321022 Minelab PRO-FIND Series Pinpointers PRO-FIND Series Pinpointers assist in accurately locating targets at the point of extraction where a metal detector coil cannot fit. This results in smaller holes, less environmental disruption and faster target recovery time. The PRO-FIND 15 offers essential core pinpointer features and is designed for simplicity and ease of use. The PRO-FIND 35 provides premium level functionality in a fully waterproof design for the serious detectorist. Both models use VLF transmission and incorporate Minelab’s unique Detector Interference Free (DIF) technology. More details are available on the PRO-FIND Series web pages: PRO-FIND 15 PRO-FIND 35 Download the new PRO-FIND Series brochure here. Download the new PRO-FIND Series Getting Started Guide here. Read the Treasure Talk Blog "The new PRO-FIND 35 hits the spot!" by Mark Williams here. More blogs to follow soon. Further product details and product availability will be announced in the coming weeks. Watch the new PRO-FIND Series Introduction video here:
    1 point
  13. Has anyone tried one of these? Looks like a versatile piece of kit! I'm wondering what kind of run time you would get out of the electric pumps on say a 29 series deep cycle battery... https://keeneeng.com/mini-max-power-sluice/
    1 point
  14. Arent meteorites / meteorite hunting with a metal detector still exempt from placer or lode claims? I know there has been some nice meteorites found in the Rye area's. Just be sure to leave the gold right where its at if you detect it on someones claim... :) Dave
    1 point
  15. Hello all. New member here to DetectorProspector. I enjoy Metal detecting for coins and jewelry as well as getting up in the mountains prospecting and sluicing. I hope to get out alot more, and be able to contribute to this community in a few of the great forums on this site.. Thanks and happy hunting to all. G
    1 point
  16. Hello all, New here to DetectorProspector and thought I 'd introduce myself. I do enjoy hitting the beach from time to time and hope to be able to learn here as well as contribute a little too. Got my trusty X705 and try and hit the beach once a week or so. Cheers all G
    1 point
  17. There are no "meteorite laws" in the United States. Which is probably why they aren't common knowledge. If you know of one I'm sure you will share it here.
    1 point
  18. Mining claims are not public land Lunk. The minerals are segregated from the public, they belong to the claim owner. It's true that if a meteorite falls on private property it belongs to the property owner. The public lands of the United States do not belong to the government they belong to the public. When a mining claim is located the minerals are granted to the locator. All members of the public that are citizens and have reached the age of majority can make a mining claim on lands open to location. You can not locate a mining claim for meteorites but you can locate a mining claim for meteorite minerals. On public lands where the minerals are still open to the public recreational and commercial collecting laws are in effect. As I recall those are based on a certain number of pounds per year. Commercial collection requires permits and taxes the same as any other lease or sale of public land materials.
    1 point
  19. This is a common misperception and simply is not the case; the meteorite laws in the U.S. clearly state that since meteorites are not part of the earthly estate of minerals, they are not locatable under the mining law and belong to the owner of the land they are found on. https://www.blm.gov/sites/blm.gov/files/uploads/MediaCenter_PublicRoom_Nevada_Meteorites1.pdf
    1 point
  20. I don't know how that rumor got started Dave. There is no such exemption and never has been. All valuable minerals on a mining claim belong to the claimant. Meteorite minerals are valuable. Heck they are usually sold by the gram which puts them right up there with the most valuable minerals found. Mining claims have been located, mined and granted patents for the meteorite minerals discovered on the claim. If you get right down to it all the minerals on every claim were put there my meteorites.
    1 point
  21. I think you've already answered your question.. However, if you're still in the process of learning all the idiosynchracies of your machine and are still not totally trusting your decision making when it comes to false numbers and/or inconsistant tone returns due to a myriad of metals within the coil's sensory grasp -- I say dig a couple / few more.. Reconfirmation of what you already know to be true should wipe out the last bit of self doubt re those "what if's.." It's a simple matter of a bit more proof to yourself is all.. This goes against the grain of "dig it all," but when you're already starting out knee-deep in trash and don't have a repeatable signal within a grouping to begin with, you need to be able to trust your judgement call for moving on.. Swamp
    1 point
  22. Okay guys to you that plan on buying this detector can see when sitting down it sits on the front edge of the control box. If you will go and look at the stand I made for the Gold Monster should work well on the MX 7. I just don't like to see my money on the ground like that and I don't have to have it covered in mud to find coins. So many great buys on detectors but so little money to buy them with. Just to let all know I'm putting myself up for adoption. The only request I have if want to adopt me that you have lots of money. I just have one bad habit and that is I like to eat good. Oh I forgot one other thing and that is I like buying every new detector that comes out. Just take a number being I sure it's going to be a long line. You didn't know you could stack bull____ up 6 feet high ! Chuck
    1 point
  23. Well, I will have to disagree here with you. A couple things first, the round HF coil, remember it can be run at 14.4khz approx,,this is not deemed high frequency. Next my testing shows comparing the round 9" HF coil to round 9" LF coil, for separation and detecting high conductive coins in a 3 d scenario nail(s) above coin, round HF has advantage. Usually while using 9" LF coil in order to maximize 3D detection scenarios of coins in iron utilization of 18khz mandatory using Deus with say Reactivty 3. My tests showed round HF coil while utilization 14.4khz bested LF coil here. And what really stood out was YES the LF coil would give detection on some scenarios, but switching to 4 Reactivty signal on nonferrous absent. But using the round HF coil, this same test when going to Reactivty level 4 detection was very good. So it seems the round HF coil will yield deeper detections of 3D scenarios on average vs using 9" LF coil. Or maybe better said, when things get more cramped with iron, the round HF coil will offer at the same time better lateral separation while at the same time better 3D plane unmaking. LF coil here is disadvantaged. Now if I didn't have round HF coil I would still be thinking in my mind Deus with 9" LF still the best at doing the above for coil size- no longer though. I when I could detector the nonferrous using both coils at Reactivty level 3, coil sweep has to be carefully managed. But the round HF coil when increasing to Reactivty 4 signal was good with more allowed variation of sweep speed. Also I witnessed stronger tone using the Round HF coil vs LF coil even when both detected tonally. These test were on top of the ground. Ground mineral levels could skew my results. But freq wise I can't go any higher using LF coil, unlike the round HF coil. For coin hunting IMO when just judging both coils from a provider of tone on nonferrous tones, Round HF clear winner. Now, since real ID is provided using LF coil with no Vdi normalization selected ( and an op can select lower freq for detection) from an ID perspective on SOME targets, the LF coil could provide an advantage for less digging of junk depending on the site. I think XP should have labeled and marketed both (the current HF coils) as both HIGH and LOWER frequency coils. Additional info. I also tested a US nickel, and here I thought the round HF coil,and LF coil, here the coils were closer but still HF coil had tendency to give signal again with reactivity 4 selected where the LF coil failed as the test were rigged even tougher for detection. Some thing I need to check, just what target conductivy level does the round HF coil with 14.4khz selected, when does its advantage start falling by the wayside. An American latest generation Indian Penny may be the best coin to retest on. It is not a high conductor really maybe a medium high. Now if the conductivy (it is tied to size of target somewhat) the round HF coil here likely will have rhe advantage. I think it is also safe to assume. Most folks with their thinking when starting off with round HF coil, didn't use 14.4khz likely, instead used the newer band of 28.8.khz, and in so doing may have been dissapointed. Thinking the 14.4kh band would really be no different than say Deus LF coil is at 12 kHz or even 18khz. So IMO there is no congruence between the round HF coil and the round9" LF coil performance wise when the same settings are utilized. I based on what I saw when testing, I truly think there will be no nonferrous target the Deus with 9" LF coil alerts on using reactivity level 3, where the round HF coil wouldn't alert on equally using Reactivty level 4. Now this is Deus round HF coil utilizing freq 14.4khz. And naturally this assumes all other settings being equal when the 2 detector/coils are being used.
    1 point
  24. One thing I can see right away that I like about this new Pro-Find is the separate sensitivity control. Using the power button on other pinpointers to work your way through a series of beeps to change sensitivity is so cumbersome that I just got used to using my Carrot on high full time. If I really want to power down I just power off and use the ratchet meathod by turning back on closer to the target. The separate control should make for quicker and easier target recovery.. Bryan
    1 point
  25. From http://www.minelab.com/__files/f/310902/4901-0223-3 GSG_PRO-FIND 15 35 Multilanguage_WEB.pdf
    1 point
  26. From http://www.minelab.com/__files/f/310872/4907-0900-2 Brochure, PRO-FIND Series A4 2p EN_WEB.pdf Click images below for larger versions....
    1 point
  27. I missed this video when it came out. It is well done however so I am posting it now - better late than never! Slick little detector for only $309.00. Fisher F44 Owner's Manual
    1 point
  28. Dang, Al, nothing? I was thinking about going up there in a day or so, when it quits raining, the surf calms down, and the low tide time gets a little more convenient. The only problem is that we're also supposed to get a little preview of January in a day or so. Wednesday's high is only supposed to be 74, which is almost pleasant unless you're in the water or wet. The water is still warm, so it might not be too bad. Man, I hate to see winter coming. I really despise having to hunt in a wetsuit. Better enjoy the beach "erosion" while we can. The big sand dump is still right on schedule for late 2018, early 2019. http://www.floridatoday.com/story/news/local/environment/2017/06/02/beach-project-rides-rocky-road/355384001/?hootPostID=67f7b180b8bfcc5496069749fc0cc93c
    1 point
  29. Haven't had the time but I found gold up in the Sierras with my GMT on a business trip. It was me, an SDC, and a GM1k. GMT kept up with both of em. Still have the mystery slugs on my desk. When work slows down I will take them to coin shop. Until then they will remain shiny lumps of some kind of alloy to me. At last I can say YES - I can find gold with a metal detector... Took long enough!
    1 point
  30. Would like to meet with you out there. Still lots of gold in Rye Patch. There are several areas not hit by the best detectors.
    1 point
  31. Sadly, I'm not finding anything golden while the shearing is on, Mitchel, but wool prices are booming ATM, so it's worth doing. Can't wait to get a detector in my hands and walk Victorian ground once more. Steady on Paul! I'm doing my best trying to find something interesting to post with Reg away - Ok, here's something - "Also near Stirling Rush, Also 13 ozs (not to be confused with the other 13 oz Wedderburn bit posted earlier) just north of Horries specimen patch, Wedderburn" John Hider Smith was the publican of the Wychitella Pub in the 80's. This is a small town north of Wedderburn, at the northern limit of the rich western Victorian gold province. Horrie was a prospector who used to get annoyingly drunk and disorderly. One night, to teach him a lesson, somebody snatched his hat (permanently welded on his head because he didn't want people to know he was going bald, but everybody knew anyway) For a while it was tossed about the bar with Horrie becoming increasingly agitated, until eventually it ended up with John, who promptly stuffed it into a box of takeaway beer handed to a stranger. Horrie never returned, much to the relief of many. During the nineties, Ian Jacques was publican of the Logan pub south of Wedderburn, and it became the location for the annual "prospectors breakup" Much big gold displayed and many a brain cell gone AWOL, but some fantastic nights. Some familiar vehicles outside: The beer was excellent: And gold to be found not too far from the pub:
    1 point
  32. It wasn't personal Mitchel. You know I'm always looking for a good opportunity to educate and you just happened to be the one to bring the right materials for me to work with. From our conversations and meetings I know you are always concerned with the status of the land you prospect. Thanks for letting me play a little on your dime. Barry
    1 point
  33. Barry, Thanks for your clarification. It is humbling to know that my 'common knowledge' and research is inadequate and incomplete in this matter. I'll have to look at more than Land Management and claims when I research open ground. Mitchel
    1 point
  34. Thanks for the kudos and your continuing support Dawg. I should point out that Land Matters is a group effort based on volunteers and donations from the public. I myself am a volunteer. Land Matters has a board of directors (I'm not an officer) as well as a nearly full time director. There are no paid employees and no advertising. I couldn't do what Land Matters does without the help of the many volunteers and donors. Many of those volunteers and donors post on this forum. Land Matters couldn't exist without those individuals support. This isn't really all about me, I'm just the loudest voice among many. My personal thanks go out to the many donors, supporters and volunteers that make Land Matters possible. Barry
    1 point
  35. Jin, since nobody has commented on your post, I just thought I'd mention that you are correct in guessing that the threshold in the video is not that of the SDC 2300; I would recognize that sound in my sleep.
    1 point
  36. Mitchel: It's probably fair to say that in the beginning, the SD prototypes were a better kept secret than "Enigma" during WW2. Later, word began to leak out. Bruce used to camouflage the prototypes in various boxes, the Goldseeker 15000 was common and the blue Whites box as well. Immediately after the SD2000 was released, I obtained a late model prototype (from tester Jim Stewart) which had been used by Pieter Heydelaar. This was housed in a red plastic Minelab "Goldstriker" box and was faulty. I was able to repair it and used it for awhile before it was returned to Bruce Candy. In my opinion it was superior in performance to the 2000. All these prototypes had a coded startup sequence in case they fell into the wrong hands. Reg sometimes ruminates on writing a book about it called "Unfair Advantage" I hope he does!
    1 point
  37. They are great. Here is my video review.
    1 point
  38. Steve' There is heaps of options in reguards to Detector technology here in Australia 70% of prospectors that "require" a detector probably don't need to spend more than a few Grand on a unit maybe less, some require spending $10,000 plus $2000 worth of assesories. iv never required the worlds most expencive detector to wander around the bush whistling a tune, but iv got a few buddy's that do... im able to get the most from a machine that probably equals the least experienced with the top of the range, iv got no need to keep flipping detectors for bigger and better plastic fantastic's out there im limited to good Detecting time as it is. Affordable, ergonomics and performance all the way.
    1 point
  39. Hi Montammie I have experienced many instances of harassment over the years whilst beach detecting but also many great times.I've had young thugs throwing beer bottles at me,Someone called the police on me one night and told them I was swinging a shotgun.I had a guy run up and grab the detector shaft and start swinging it wildly in front of his mates.But the many nice people far outweighed any issues.Most people showed interest in the hobby or when explained understood the pastime. Since moving to the goldfields over 7 years its been sweet sailing as there are many like minded people to meet.
    1 point
  40. It's not only beaches but parks, too! If I'm not in the mood to socialize I'll start signing in American Sign Language with a normal resting face - wearing headphones! Most people are utterly confused and walk when I do that. And the comments...lol.
    1 point
  41. Last year we were at Pismo beach which is absolutly a great place to hunt. I was toiling along detecting during mid day when the beach is absolutely loaded with people. I happen look up at one point and I notice 5 very attractive middle aged women sitting on the beach watching me and smiling.. .....bachelorette party I'm thinking... So I stop and take off my headphones. Sweat is dripping off me and I'm feeling kinda studly so I shove the head of the scoop forcefully into the sand with my foot, lean against the carbon fiber handle and smile back at them lol. Any luck? one of them asks.... Just some coins I reply back..... Then the next one asks ....Whats your best find? My wife I reply.....Good answer says another... lol strick
    1 point
  42. This subject comes up so often it is time to get it into its own thread so I can just link to it in the future. It is best to think of metal detectors made for prospecting as "nugget detectors" as that is the truth of the matter. Nuggets have some size to them. Metal detectors are electromagnetic devices, and as such can detect items that are conductive and non-magnetic, like gold, or non-conductive but magnetic, like magnetite. Or both, like metallic iron. When dealing with gold you are dealing only with conductivity. The more conductive the mass, the easier it is to detect. In general what this means is bigger is better. Any detector has a limit to how small an item it can detect. Here is the kicker. Multiple undetectable targets do not add up to create a detectable target. I do not know how many times I've seen or been told of people throwing a vial of small gold on the ground and running a detector over it and declaring the detector will not find gold because it does not pick up the vial of gold. Or people thinking the detector has a problem. Let us say that on a scale of 0 - 10 zero represents an undetectable piece of gold, and 10 one that really beeps. 0 + 0 + 0 + 0 + 0 still equals zero. So lots of tiny gold is just as undetectable as a single piece of tiny gold. You need a single conductive mass. Fine gold usually has a coating, and putting a bunch of fine gold in a vial still results in little or no signal. If the gold is super clean and packed tightly you will get a weak signal. Melt it all together, and now it goes beep. Another way to look at it is take some fine gold and pour it in a pile. Get a multimeter and test your little pile of gold for conductivity. It is hard to get much current if any through a loose pile of gold. So bottom line is you might have 5 ounces of fine gold right under your feet, and you will walk right over it with your metal detector. Rich gold ore where the gold is finely dispersed in the rock will be hard to detect or undetectable. Wiry or spongy masses of gold are hard to detect. Jewelry hunters run into this when trying to detect lost necklaces. A fine chain is very hard to detect as each link is undetectable and the connection between the links is poor enough the signals does not add up to much. Often all you can detect is the clasp. Rings even display this issue if the weld breaks. A complete ring really gives a great signal. Break the ring, it will be very hard to detect. Now once an item is detectable, it does add up. 10 + 10 = 20 so two large nuggets in the same spot are easier to detect than each by itself. If each link in the gold chain can be detected, then it will add up into a more detectable target. A fun trick with target id detectors is to tape 5 nickels together and run them under the coil. They will read as 25 cents!
    1 point
  43. Great response! I like how you described how nuggets bedding down in the same spot will produce a stronger signal. Last summer, I hit two spots with the Gold Bug Pro where I got a very broad signal in packed dirt, shallow on bedrock. I had never experienced this before, and I didn't know what to make of it. I almost thought it was some kind of ground mineralization effect or something, but as I'd been finding nuggets consistently in that area, I dug all of the dirt anyway. In the process of scraping and gathering, I uncovered a crevice that ran about ten inches deep, cleaned it out as well, and threw everything in the gold pan. The signal in the ground was gone, but now there was a strong signal in the pan! I panned down the dirt a bit and quickly saw the flash of gold. I spread the dirt out with the water and it was full of small nuggets, any of which, individually, the detector easily saw. There was also a 4 gram nugget keeping them company that I eyeballed as I cleaned out the crevice. As all of those nuggets had bedded down in that pocket/crevice together, that was what produced the broad signal in the dirt, but when they were concentrated in the smaller area of the pan, the signal was stronger. Thanks, as you may have solved a bit of a mystery for me. That was a fun day, and unbelievably, I repeated it a couple of weeks later on another section of bedrock! I doubt it will ever happen again as it's never happened before. I mean, I've hit concentrations of small nuggets before, but they rang individually as I swept the coil over them because they were more spread out in their patch's area. They did not give out the broad signal I received on the nuggets that were much closer together. All the best, Lanny
    1 point
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