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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/26/2019 in all areas

  1. Welcome everyone This is my first topic in this wonderful forum It was found a few days ago in Saudi Arabia Weight 2653 grams
    14 points
  2. I'm a little disappointed in the lack of West Coast Beach Hunter finds. I see the whole coast line getting slammed with storm after storm and high winds. Is this not the PRIME TIME to be out there swinging exposed layers of gravels and hard-pan? I know there has to be crusty black discs (silver coins) and the gimmer of gold beneath the coil. Show us you mighty few & faithful... as we inlanders are snowed in and football season is over. I know there has to be a select handful of hardcore detector abusers out there willing to brave the sharks. I've got me new CA style cowboy boots on and Equinox packed ready to go if the invite comes?
    5 points
  3. The gold bearing greenstone belts of Sudan and NE Africa which launched the African detector boom roughly a decade ago are also found in southern Saudi Arabia. Same geology, same detector results.
    5 points
  4. Buddy mine found these turtles last Dec frozen in a farm field. They were smaller than a quarter. They were hibernating but the farm is active and they would have turned it over before they could make it out of there. Don't know what number they showed up as ? Will be releasing them in june.
    4 points
  5. Image for reference:
    4 points
  6. They normally wait to drop until some invading Yank shows up. ????
    4 points
  7. It finally stopped raining for a couple of days and I was able to get to the farm and try out the new ORX on a couple of old tenant house sites. These old sites date from around the 1930's or so based on the coin dates. They also sit on or near older sites so you are never sure what you will find. Coin deep was too sparky for me on these sites due to the massive amounts of iron and nails. I switched back and forth between Coin Fast at 15.2 and 28.8k, standard settings with iron tone "on". I found the 28.8 frequency to be my favorite. Once while running in 15.2k I noticed a small aluminum brad on top of the ground (about the size of a match head). In 15.2 I didn't get even a peep out of it. I then switched to 28.8 and got a nice loud tone. The separation in the extreme trash was excellent! My better finds for the day was 3 Wheaties, 1 War nickel, 2 Mississippi tax tokens, 1 Louisiana tax token, part of a broken spur, a broken tent tensioner, and one D Buckle. Thanks for viewing, MT
    3 points
  8. Oh, I did forget to mention those giant roachs!!! I really, really hate those the most! fred
    3 points
  9. Roots are actually a separate issue. Quite a few detectors will detected a large root for various reasons. Thunderstorms create a ground potential. Lightning as much leaps up from the ground as strikes downward. I could certainly see this as possibly creating issues in surface weeds. The GPX and GPZ can detect variations in the earth's magnetic field and lightning strikes many miles away. The receiver sensitivity is astounding. Source
    2 points
  10. Here you go Fred. (I had no idea how long this would take . . .) Mountain scenery and that beautiful blue alpine sky. We grow tall mountains around here. The time of year when the bees get busy. Some of the ways the water moves around. All shut down getting ready for the move. Speed-panning wonder! This bedrock is heading uphill at an insane angle. My son trying a little high-banking, but he zeroed in that spot and quickly went back to detecting (just because a spot looks good, doesn't mean it is?). This bedrock has a great chance of hiding something . . . My robust, torquey blue mule. That diesel engine is just starting to get broke in (million mile Cummins wonders). My son cutting his teeth on the Minelab GPX 5000 (I hope his wife still likes me as he has a wonderful case of the fever!?). Look what the Gold Racer sniffed out: small stuff, and chunky pieces too! (The Bug Pro and the GPX accounted for a lot of sassy gold over the two days as well.) Some of the meat to go with the smaller potatoes. I think this picture says it all about the clichés about gold and rainbows. (Shot this picture from an excavation after a summer shower.) All the best, Lanny
    2 points
  11. Love the videos and finds. How you were able to videotape that cow pissing on the Barber made me realize, I need to quit putting my finds in mouth. I need to get some "newbie juice" as you call it and I am most certain the salty shivers will go away.
    2 points
  12. We don’t like to brag and show off our pull tab and bottle cap collections. Um....I don’t know what to say about those bootdals/sandoots but I’m with Ridge Runner on this one.
    2 points
  13. Cane toads are nothing. Probably the only thing that freaks me a little while out in the bush is walking into a golden orb weavers web. They're not a little spider and their web is fairly strong so you tend to spend the next 10 minutes looking to make sure the spiders not in your hair or on your shirt. Although I do think they are relatively harmless. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_silk_orb-weaver The big inch ants are the other thing to watch out for. The suckers have big nippers that they use to hold on while they sting you with their tail. And they really hurt! https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myrmecia_forficata
    2 points
  14. Dang Pat you shouldnt have brought up the bears down there!!! The limbs are bad enough....
    2 points
  15. Welcome to the forum - that is some very impressive gold! 2014 USGS Report - The Mineral Industry of Saudi Arabia "Gold.—In 2014, MGBM operated five gold mines in Saudi Arabia and mined 3.86 Mt of gold ore compared with 3.28 Mt in 2013; it produced 4,789 kg of gold in 2014, which was a 15.2% increase compared with the 4,158 kg of gold produced in 2013. Most of the increase was attributed to the entry of the As Suq Mine into production in March. Production by MGMB included about 1,506 kg from the Al Amar Mine, 1,685 kg from the Bulgah Mine, 1,066 kg from the Mahd Adh-Dahab gold mine, 449 kg from the As Suq Mine, and 84 kg from the Sukhaybarat Mine. The Al Hajar gold mine in Asir Province, which produced about 25 kg of gold in 2013, was mined out and closed and MGBM was exploring for copper and zinc in the mine area. MGBM was on track to increase its gold production to 15,550 kg (reported at 500,000 troy ounces) by 2017. Production increases were expected at all the company’s operating gold mines but most of the projected increase in gold production was expected to come from the Ad Duwayhi Mine, which is located in Makkah Province. The mine was expected to produce 2,177 kg in 2015, 4,354 kg in 2016, and 5,598 kg in 2017 (Saudi Arabian Mining Co., 2015a, p. 12, 69–72, 104–105; 2015b). JORC-compliant estimates of gold resources in the Central Arabian gold region of Saudi Arabia were about 272 Mt grading between 0.82 and 8.14 grams per metric ton (g/t) gold. Ma’aden’s Masarah gold project was part of the development in the Central Arabian gold region in 2014, which had a deposit containing about 22.3 Mt of resource at an average grade of 2.19 g/t at a cutoff grade of 0.8 g/t gold according to the prefeasibility study (Saudi Arabian Mining Co., 2015a, p. 104)." Placer gold deposits in the Hofuf Formation The Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia (large pdf report with color photos and many charts. 1981 USGS Report - GOLD PLACER AND QUATERNARY STRATIGRAPHY OF THE JABAL MOKHYAT AREA, SOUTHERN NAJD PROVINCE, KINGDOM OF SAUDI ARABIA
    2 points
  16. Most of the time its from the added weight of the drop bears waiting to pounce....?
    2 points
  17. Some got it and some got to go get it . With that foot ware I wouldn’t be caught dead in . Chuck
    2 points
  18. They seem most likely to randomly drop limbs when it is stinking hot & calm. Obviously in strong winds & storms they come down, but those hot calm days I have been out bush and heard them crashing down. You would be bloody unlucky to get hit with one, but you never know.
    2 points
  19. When conditions are right then slow swinging wins the day. The silver band is a half ounce! The other silver ring has a nice little amber stone. Mitchel
    2 points
  20. This NOAA website Interagency Elevation Inventory shows where, and what kind of LIDAR the U.S. government agencies have available. There are links to the mapped data downloads. Most of the green areas on the map are only about 3 foot resolution so they may or may not be an improvement on the existing DEMs. Open Topography is another good source for free lidar data. It's more international in scope. The Tahoe Basin Lidar set is very high resolution as PG-Prospecting pointed out. It looks like there are several nice sets in New Zealand. You can directly download a selected area at this website. You will probably notice that the coasts have some pretty good LIDAR coverage and quality but the west has been pretty much left out of the feds LIDAR efforts. It's always a good idea to check your State's GIS office to see if they have different coverage.
    2 points
  21. I'm no subatomic particle physicist, but I am a vegetarian, and I haven't noticed any more charged particles than usual in my salad. Sorry Frozendaze, but I just couldn't resist!? Seriously though, I'm in the same neck of the desert and I haven't noticed anything out of the ordinary when swinging the Zed through the green stuff.
    2 points
  22. Threshold blanking or nulling tells you two things if you choose to run the threshold where you can hear it. First, rejected items will blank or null as the coil passes over them. You know you have encountered a rejected item.Too much of this may alert you to a need to increase the recovery speed. On clean ground excessive nulling means you need to check your ground balance and sensitivity setting. An incorrect ground balance will throw off lots of ferrous signals, and if you have these rejected the machine will null constantly. Check the ground balance first. If this does not fix things, you may want to reduce the sensitivity setting. Excessive “blowback” from ground signals can cause target masking. These reasons are why I prefer to have a threshold sound - it keeps me better informed as to what is going on under the coil so I can adjust accordingly. Great post Mitchel!
    2 points
  23. Golden Grams of Goodness: Part 1 November is not usually a time of year that I get to chase the gold, as by the time November rolls around the ground usually requires some dynamite or some equally powerful force to break through the frost to get to the gold. However, this year has been a year of exceptions. In September, we had early snow and frost with well below seasonal temperatures that carried into October, and that doesn't happen very often as usually the weather is rather mild. However, after the early blast of Arctic bad temper, the weather shook itself out until the first week of November with temperatures soaring above average, so this allowed the chance to engage in some gold sleuthing when normally I'd be reduced to only dreaming of chasing the gold. I have two sons, and the eldest loves to chase the gold, while the other will chase the gold given the opportunity, but he doesn't have the same level of passion. Me eldest was with me on this trip, and he was with me on our epic gold adventure when we truly slew an army of nuggets early in the summer (I have yet to post that story), so he was eager to have a chance to hone his detecting and sniping skills. The area we dropped into to work was full of bedrock pinnacles. These pinnacles were formed of an iron-hard bedrock, so hard that the big equipment had negligible effect. In fact, smoke was pouring off the bucket teeth and blades of the excavators as they tried to outmuscle the mother rock. As a result, there was a section of ground about the size of two school buses parked side-by-side, but slightly longer. Looking down into the excavation, there were three pools of standing water as well as a small stream of clear seepage water running diagonally across the northern, more elevated end of the bedrock. The southern end was where the largest pool of water was, and the eastern side of the excavation had a culvert that was collecting the water from the stream to then divert it through a long series of interconnected culverts to a sump where a six-inch diesel-powered pump was working night and day to keep that sump cleared. Over the entire area of exposed bedrock, there were many buried, small gutters with high, then lower humps, and throughout the area, there were those dark pinnacles of super-hard bedrock, some of them rising up almost four feet, resulting in an area that could not be cleaned out properly by the modern miners with their big equipment. The area was perfect for detector and sniping work, making it a perfect area for us to tackle. To be continued . . . All the best, Lanny
    1 point
  24. I've only had my 800 for about a week, so I made some simple ID cards using Steve's graphic, to get familiar with the machine. I have extras, and with Steve's permission, I'm offering 1 to the first 50 interested. These are simple, pocket size, laminated cards, with large bold font. Target IDs on the front, detector settings menu on the back. Edit 2/19/19 by Steve Herschbach. The offer to mail you one of these free is long past. Just download the pdf, print, and laminate your own. idcardfinal.pdf
    1 point
  25. Finally got a video up that goes over and shows some the uses and benefits of lidar maps for the gold prospector and metal detectorist. I also delve into some drone usage stuff at the end of the video. Let me know what you think, and if your interested in some feel free to contact me. I will hopefully have a website up in the near future, when i do i will let everyone know here. Thanks for watching!
    1 point
  26. Just returned home from a crazy road-trip. We had a work event in Las Vegas last week, and we had some equipment to haul in.The company said they'd pay my gas, so I decided to drive it, and take a few extra days off and go to one of my old Spanish trail sites to detect on my way home. What a trip it turned out to be! Snow blizzard on the way to Vegas. Then from Vegas to California, was one of the worst rain storms in like 50 years...I was out on a little two lane, twisty, curvy road that routes you though the mountains and it started out as just small oozes of mud filling areas of the road, or wet slicks as water filled the roads, but as I progressed higher into the mountains, it was progressively worsening, now small streams and creeks and boulders were taking over the road, then massive mud slides onto the roads. The road would worsen. The roads were washed out and flooded with white water rivers now taking over, filling the road with a debris field of rocks, small trees and brush, and tons of sand. One one occasion I was blasting through what amounted to a massive river flowing across the road, and while trying to blast though it a massive sand bar under the water attempted to trap the car, but luckily the FJ is a very capable off road vehicle, and it was able to make it though this and many more obstacles to come. So after all this, I get to my destination and the motel had canceled everyone's reservations because they had no water or power. Great, now I'm out in the middle of BFE with no place to stay and I'm not driving back through raging water flash floods. I ended up spending the night in my FJ Cruiser in the middle of the desert. It was a weird night, to be made even more strange by the fact that the only radio station I could pick up out there was playing Indian chants all night - LOL Between storms, I managed to get in a day of detecting, but with an even larger storm system nipping at my heals, I decided to head back before it hit the fan! I managed a good day testing the 15" Equinox coil at a site that's been stingy lately. Tom and I hunted it the last time we were there, and neither of us dug a single coin, but for whatever reason the Equinox lit it up (tu) Enjoy! Flickr account is buggered up, else I'd post a still pic, but here's the video: GL&HH Cal
    1 point
  27. These are my thoughts on the ORX...
    1 point
  28. Just talked to steve over the phone, asked some questions about the shafts, steve will take the time to tell u everything about his shafts customer service is above and beyond. Ordering my shaft today cant get here soon enough.
    1 point
  29. I've found several key date silver coins over the years, and a rare gold coin, but I don't really ever plan to sell my coins I've found.. If they already have environmental damage, I try to make them "presentable". Depending on their condition, I may do anything from a simple light baking soda rub, to Ezest. True once you clean them you cannot go back, but on the other hand, if you never plan to sell them, and want to enjoy them, do as you please in my opinion. The best preserved silver coin I've ever found was a 1906-S Barber dime at a park demo in San Francisco several years ago. As soon as I popped it out of the ground, I couldn't believe how pristine it was, it looked like it was dropped the day it was minted. I did nothing but rinse it off with water to clean it. I had some free PCGS gradings and decided to send it in with some other coins for grading. Not only did it not get a cleaned or environmental damage label, it came back graded as a MS60, common date, but at that condition it's a $300 coin. Bummer none of the key date silvers I've dug were that clean, but it is what it is. At the end of the day, if you really think about it, the odds are so stacked against us to even find a key date coin to begin with it's staggering, add to that the likelihood of environmental damage and when you finally do find a nice one, it's like winning the lottery!
    1 point
  30. Even though I carry newbie juice in my finds pouch, I still have a habit of using the old fashioned oral cleaning method ? Ironically I don't think about cow pee when putting the coins in my mouth Thanks for watching Gerry, I need to test out the Equinox 800's prospecting mode, I like your find a lot better then mine!
    1 point
  31. My note was more generic in nature and not aimed at Beach Mode specifically. That said, I am not aware of any “disabling” of ground balance in the Beach Modes. I would think the regular beach hunters would have noticed such a thing and been all over it way before now. I honestly do not know as beach detecting has been the area I know least about on the Equinox. I just did a "quickie test" and it does appear changing the GB setting while in Beach Mode affects no change in ground response. I will drop a note to somebody that knows more than I do to see if I can get a comment. One of our forum members also commented on Findmall that he thinks Beach Mode is "locked" into a "0" setting. "11. Beach mode -- despite higher frequency weighting -- did not offer improved detection of high conductors, as I thought it might. One reason, I believe, may be that because ground balance is "locked" to zero in beach mode (which I did not know until today), and with my test-garden dirt balancing in the high 40s to high 50s, this was too much of an "offset" from the fixed "0" balance for beach mode to "shine" in this case (my guess)." (emphasis added). This was posted to several forums a year ago. The latest version of the Equinox Owner's Manual still mentions ground tracking as a potential option in Beach Mode on page 41. "Tracking Ground Balance can also be useful when using Beach Mode 2 underwater at the beach (in salt water)." Equinox For Beach & Water Hunting
    1 point
  32. Here is a photo of the finds that I had mentioned in a previous post. Nearly all of these finds were found on one small ridge that we had come to think of as being hunted out (using a variety of non-minelab detectors). Thanks for looking, MT
    1 point
  33. Very nice save TMox. Please give us the story with that Seated save. Key Date coin too (low mintage 80K) makes it even more desirable.
    1 point
  34. As a military Veteran myself (USMC) and one who did not know where my DD-214 was, I've learned where and how to get it. There are also other forms of ID that Gerry's Detectors will accept and get you the 15% discount. Each state is a little different but for those who are not sure, call me for details. This is a fantastic dollar amount of savings on higher end detectors (15%) and right now combining the VET $1200 savings and a FREE $1500 19" coil on the GPZ-7000, plus the 3 Days of Field Training we offer...what better way to enjoy ones retirement or getting all your toys purchased for those golden years. Even the very popular Equinox 800 (true multi purpose detector) allows a VET a $135 savings. And don't forget the FREE "Metal Detector Basics Class" I offer to all general purpose and multi use detector sales. 1st class is Saturday March 16th, provided the snow has melted.
    1 point
  35. I have dealt with this somewhat. A plant, shrub, or tree root with a high water content, can run somewhat irratic. Also slow you down and have to check out some possible targets a few extra sweeps to rule them out. Lowering the sensitivity slightly helps. Along with a slow coil sweep. But in my instances, this issue seems to be more prevalent when thunderstorms are nearby.
    1 point
  36. https://www.archives.gov/veterans/military-service-records
    1 point
  37. Crikey, take no notice of em MN, just don`t forget the "Aeroguard"...……….
    1 point
  38. I ordered one today from Amazon and I cant wait to try it.
    1 point
  39. Golden Bonanza Days, Part 2:In the meantime, I’d finished all of my adjustments on the Racer, and I went off to investigate a different spot, some way off in the excavation from the area my son was detecting, as I had seen some little pockets of intact channel that had some spidery cracks in the bedrock running outward from them on my initial walkthrough. After a few swings (no kidding), I had the coil over a soft sound. A bit of scraping later, and I’d trapped the signal in my scoop. Into the pan it went. (Now, please remember that I use a super-magnet on an extendable wand whenever I detect bedrock [worked recently or anciently], so it really helps eliminate ferrous trash, and this means that any target that goes into the scoop is non-ferrous.) After a few more swings, I’d hit on two more targets that went into the pans for my wife’s speed-panning operation. Then, a slew of targets went into the pans.Meanwhile, as I was collecting signals, my son was busy adding more targets to his pans. (I had two pans to fill, and he had two pans for target material as well.)During our nugget hunting, my wife set up her panning station in a convenient bedrock pool of crystal water, water about the temperature of glacial meltwater by the way, and she was ready to get her panning gloves wet (she uses those little gardening gloves that have rubber palms and fingers with a canvas back as they insulate well enough to take the sting out of the coldness), so she wandered over to my son to gather a pan of possible goodness, and she swung by me to grab one of my pans too.(To describe the site in more detail, there was a sloped ramp that led down into the excavation where the rock trucks had run back and forth to be filled by the excavator. There were the remnants of a pad by the ramp where the excavator had sat during the last scraping of the dirt for the last cleanup, the pad having been moved up above the level of the excavation so the last of the pay could be scraped from the bedrock.In opposition to this, the far end of the excavation had been worked first, the work proceeding backward in the direction of the exit ramp until the cleanup reached that location. What remained in the excavation or open-pit site were ridges of rising bedrock, deeper excavated low-lying areas where the bedrock was soft [or areas of contact zones where soft bedrock met hard] or where ancient channel material had gathered in natural gutters or larger crevices, and there were pools of standing water [I always check these with a waterproof coil] where seepage had found a way to fill depressions or where runoff from springs on the margins of the excavation had filled low spots. On a related note, some of the bedrock had been bent and warped by tremendous geological forces in the past, and these places held little concentrations of material left over from when the bedrock was super-hard enough to resist the might of the excavator’s bucket.In a few places there were small sections of friable rock [in this case slate] that when found, I always detect first, then later pan as those plates of perpendicular placement [in 90-degree opposition to the underlying bedrock] act as excellent gold traps, traps that were working in earnest as the dinosaurs plodded across the ancient streambed when large sections of the planet were in a more tropical state.As well, there were those aforementioned contact zones, always excellent places to detect as small slices of the softer rock were sometimes in place against the harder rock, or there were ledges, sometimes terraced, with bits of material intact, and these traps often produce some nice gold. [On a related note, I learned a long time ago to trust my detector, not my eyes when scouring bedrock. What I mean by this is that oftentimes bedrock appears to be solid, especially when is is of uniform color, so it seems a better use of time to detect areas where visible intact material is concentrated, but this is one of Mother Nature’s grand deceptions, whether the bedrock has been worked by recent miners or mother rock worked by the Sourdoughs.Mining tip for the rookies: always, always, always take the time to go slow to let the detector read the bedrock contours and surfaces, to check the little invisible gutters and pockets, and yes, to find the hidden crevices that snapped shut when some monstrous dinosaur tromped on it while crossing, or more likely, when some massive boulders tossed along those streambeds, by some titanic hydraulic event, forced their will upon the yielding bedrock.To be continued . . .All the best,Lanny
    1 point
  40. Testing the HF round coil for depth.....
    1 point
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  42. That is what is left after a troll chews a tire. Trolls chew tires like we chew bubble gum. They cough those up like an owl afterwards. I dunno shrug HH Mike
    1 point
  43. Tesoro is on all of the advertisements to be one of the main sponsors for the Quartzite Gold Show next weekend Feb 8th -10th. We'll see........
    1 point
  44. Hello all! Based on requests from several folks who are curious, I went ahead and did some air testing with my new Minelab 6” coil, attached to my Equinox 800. I wanted to give some idea of the relative capabilities of this coil as compared to the 11” coil. While all the normal caveats of air testing apply – such as air-test results in no way mirror in-ground results, etc. etc. etc., I do think there is at least a little bit of value when doing side-by-side air testing of two different coils for comparison purposes. Anyway, how much value exists in such a test is up to each individual to decide; I simply wanted to provide the data. I also did a Youtube video, which I will post a link to as soon as it is done uploading. In the video, I did NOT record the testing of all the coins; I ran only the silver Roosevelt dime in the video to show you, audibly, what quality of signal I listened for in order to call it a “hit.” In other words, how repeatable of a signal I listened for before I assigned a depth value to that particular coin, with that particular coil. The rest of the video is just some discussion of a few points regarding the coil, and the testing. Anyway, here is the data… Minelab Equinox 800 11” and 6” coils, air-test comparison, done indoors Park 1 Mode Sensitivity 18 Noise Cancel Channel 7 All-metal mode (horseshoe button engaged) Ground Balance 0 Recovery Speed 4 (on the 800, equivalent to 2 on the 600) Iron Bias 2 (on the 800, equivalent to 1 on the 600) Here are the results: After this “apples to apples” comparison, where I tested both coils using identical settings, I then re-tested a couple of coins (specifically the silver dime and the silver quarter) on the 6” coil, but this time bumping sensitivity to 22. I found that I was able to run sensitivity about 3 points higher, as the 6” coil is (as expected) less affected by EMI. Since “18” is a rather conservative sensitivity for a 6” coil, (but that is as high as I could go with the 11” in my indoor testing, and since I wanted to keep it “apples to apples”), I wanted to see how much depth gain I would get on the 6” coil if I bumped sensitivity up some. Here are those results: In summary, you can see that the 6” coil (at 18 sensitivity) loses roughly 1 ¾” depth on each coin, in an air test, as compared to the 11” coil. You can also see that by bumping the sensitivity on the 6” coil up from 18 to 22, you “gain back” most of the loss of air-test depth, getting to within ½” to ¾” of depths achieved by the 11” coil, set at 18 sensitivity. SO…while you DO lose depth with the 6” coil, as expected, you may – in a real-world scenario – be able to gain most of that depth back, due to being able to run it at a higher sensitivity setting. Overall, I am thus far impressed with the coil, and can’t wait to use it “in the field,” where I can begin to get a feel for its REAL value – its ability to separate, in trashy sites. Steve
    1 point
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  47. The main problem with people seeking “magic settings” is that there is no such thing. The settings HAVE to vary with ground conditions and target/trash mix. I always try to run my detectors for maximum audio feedback and listen to what they are telling me. The detector literally tells me I am running too hot or not hot enough, recovery speed too high or too low, etc. I do this usually by running 50 tones with no items rejected, which means I really do not need the threshold tone since I hear everything. If I reject any items then I need the threshold to alert me to nulling effects. My settings vary constantly depending on the ground and target mix plus my mood at the time. Many people find 50 tones too busy or tiring to listen to and I get that. For me a detector running too quiet is like trying to understand a person who has been gagged. Too much information lost and now my detector is not talking to me anymore. I prefer constant feedback and keep volume levels low so it does not barrage my ears. That said for park hunting I am spoiling myself at times cherry picking and running silent or with fewer tones. Very refreshing I must admit! There are dozens of ways Equinox can be run to suit most anyone and no one method is correct. The idea here should be to have fun and enjoy yourself. Or are you doing this to get rich? Good luck!
    1 point
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