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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/15/2020 in all areas

  1. As many of you have no doubt heard, the COVID19 situation in El Paso is pretty serious. I posted a while ago information I got from them that they were busy working and shipping product (not so many AQ’s - but). Well, I just had a chance to talk to my main contact in Sales Management at FTP and I think it is useful to share the general message I got. She explained to me that the (new) facility at FTP has advanced air circulation and filtration systems - that all personnel have been provided with highly effective face masks and that workstations and all other aspects of the internal organization of where people work and how they interact with each other have been carefully arranged to absolutely minimize the chance of infection. Her general comment was - the time we spend at work is the safest part of our days. Tom (the President) is deeply involved in making this a safe workplace and has spared no expense in doing so.
    10 points
  2. Well, my lake hunting days are coming to end due to a move to Hamilton TX very soon. Had a very good day hunting at the waterline as the lake level continues to drop. Ended up with 5 rings, 3 silver, 1 10k class ring and a junk toe ring. 2 of the silver rings are James Avery's. I'll begin to track down the owner of the class ring. I can't make out the year as it's almost completely worn off. But, maybe the school can fill in the blanks. The bigger silver ring hit at 32-34...the other 2, solid 26...the 10k gold ring locked on at 14
    4 points
  3. So the tides were decent enough on my days off to try again for some gold with the AQ or GPX. Since my beaches will not relent with the sanding in, I decided to try another strategy. Day one was split between the AQ for low tide and the GPX for deep silver. With the beach heavily sanded at low tide, all I could do was get some junk jewelry with the AQ. The GPX scored 3 silvers using the monster 18"DD Detech coil. It must have been a sight watching this guy struggle with that coil while holding a side stick and a big spade shovel 😄 The GPX wins that day. But... Day two was raining, so the GPX loses by default ... tough luck GPX (needs to be waterproof, hint, hint) So all day long I used the AQ at another beach which has a decent low tide. But as usual around here, it was sanded in more than ever. Low tide produced very few targets, just 3 zinc cents, some small junk jewelry and bottle caps. It looked like a wasted trip. But I wandered around all over, from high to low tide looking for a break. I knew that the rings were out of reach by the level of the sand against a breaker wall, so I decided to look for small jewelry in hopes of finding a gold stud or even a charm. No luck until I hit a small slope. By this time I had put gold out of my mind and just wanted to dig for the rest of the day. I used the all metal mode exclusively, just to boost the number of targets. I did get a lot of iron and bottle caps but then it happened. I got gold!!!!! No, not Joe or Mitchel kind of gold, 🙄 but more like anything I can get will do gold. So a small prayer necklace pendant shows up. I could tell it was gold right away. 10k it is...my FIRST gold with the AQ. I could now relax. So I started to grid this area carefully and a little while later I got a hit and could see a small bit of the target I thought was going to be a small silver earring. But it turned out to be a 10k diamond studded Ankh symbol. Looks like a cross with a loop at the top. It's used in ancient Egypt, representing the symbol of life. Gorgeous little piece and my SECOND gold with the AQ. I was in shock. So I start to look around as I am getting back up and about 3 feet from that target I can visually see pieces of a gold rope chain sticking out of the sand. In my moment of professionalism, I tried every combination on the AQ to better find chains......... Actually I just grabbed that thing as fast as I could 😂 So I haven't tried the AQ to see if it actually would pick the chain up or not. But technically not my THIRD gold of the day since it is .925 with 1/12 10K overlay. I think they call that Vermeil. My bad day turned real good, real fast. I hunted a while longer and called it a day. Thank you AQ for hitting that first gold target and making me stay in that area!
    3 points
  4. GB, For the most part, the musketballs are generally thought to have been in small barrels from the 1715 Fleet! And are generally found in groups! There is some conjecture on the spent bullets, but they appear to be from between the 40's and 60's! From people just target shooting into the bank! There was also alot of WW2 training going on not too far South of here with live ammunition, including 50 cal. and bombs! That coin was a 65' quarter! Underneath which may be a smashed musketball, or spru piece! And the other one is one of those possible WW2 spent bullets!👍👍
    3 points
  5. This topic comes up often (for metal detectors in general, not just the Minelab Eqx). From what I've learned here and in other readings, 'mineralization' as used in metal detecting refers to ferromagnetic minerals which are far and away dominated by certain (not all) iron oxides, particularly Fe3O4. Two naturally occurring minerals which are the most responsible are magnetite and maghemite (but not hematite, which is the most common ore used in iron processing, AFAIK). Ground balancing is matching adjusting for the phase shift of ground minerals in general, and although Fe3O4 will contribute, there's more to ground phase than the ferromagnetic component. Thus knowing the ground phase or ground balance setting doesn't tell you the mineralization. (Some detectors such as the Fisher Gold Bug, the Fisher F75, the XP Deus, and some White's models have actual ferromagnetic mineralization strength readouts.) The Equinox unfortunately does not. I think the recommendation for ground balancing of the Eqx goes like this: "When first learning the detector, leave it at 0. As you get more comfortable with the detector, adjust it." I always adjust mine at turn-on if I don't foget, but it often tells me when it's set improperly by grunting when my coil isn't swung perfectly parallel to the ground. Even in my moderate ground it can change over scales of 10's of meters, so I often adjust in the middle of a hunt. Also note that each mode and even single frequency within a search category (Park 1, Park 2, Field 1, etc.) has its own ground balance setting. (Ground balance is a 'local' setting, not a 'global' setting, using terms from the Eqx manual.) BTW, welcome to the detectorprospector.com forum, longbow62!
    3 points
  6. Many people think that gold was discovered at Sutter's Mill in January of 1848 but it was actually discovered on March 9, 1842 in Southern California. That is the official 'story' here: http://www.hometownstation.com/santa-clarita-latest-news/in-history-placerita-canyon-celebrates-176th-anniversary-of-the-oak-of-the-golden-dream-224619 Mitchel
    2 points
  7. With the fantastic weather in the Rye Patch region during the month of October, I was chomping at the bit to get down there, but my summer job didn't end until the 30th. It still took me a few days afterward to get everything wrapped up, so I finally hit the road and met up with Gerry and friends at Rye Patch the following Tuesday. The detector training class we were scheduled to give that weekend ended up being cancelled, thanks to a winter storm that was forecast to move into the area on Friday. Needless to say, having only two days of optimal detecting conditions before being snowed out and forced to move on to Arizona was a total bummer.😞 Intent on finding a few bits of gold in-spite of the looming storm system and armed with our trusty Minelab GPZ 7000 gold detectors (and one SDC 2300 - also quite trusty, btw), we hit an old patch in hopes of digging up some previously overlooked yellow metal. Only two small nuggets were found after a couple of hours searching with four coils on the ground - not a very good start. It was then that I remembered another old patch nearby that I had completely forgotten about, it had been so long since I had been there. It wasn't a very good producer back in the day, but perhaps we would be able to find a few nuggets that the VLF and early PI machines may have left behind. Within minutes of hitting the ground, my good friend Chef Rusty and I both popped a shallow sub-gram nugget; not a bad start. Soon, everyone was digging good gold! My second target gave an obvious yet deep sounding signal response from the GPZ's stock 14” coil. I imagined it to be a three or four gram piece at a depth of 12” to 18”. Gerry noticed me digging quite an excavation and came over to capture the action on video. At a measured depth of 20”, the target was finally out of the hole, and as I held it aloft there was an audible gasp from the audience that had gathered to watch, followed by cheers and fist-bumps: After a thorough cleaning, the specimen weighed in at a whopping 40 grams - a totally unexpected and pleasant surprise! The nuggets kept biting sporadically for everyone the rest of the day, and the same was repeated the following day. Just goes to show that sometimes the ZVT tech can really ignite an old burned-out nugget patch. Much fun was had by all, and it really made up for such a short two-day detecting trip. Pictured below are my finds, including the 40 gram chunk, a couple nuggets at over 8 grams, and all the small bits, with a total combined weight of over 66 grams.
    2 points
  8. From this Codan annual report document "During FY21, Minelab will introduce a new gold detector, which will include the best features from both the SDC 2300 and GPX platforms" "Minelab will soon release a new GPX detector which introduces an ease of use technology, GeoSense Pulse Induction, and will sit within the premium end of our gold detector product portfolio." Also: "progressed the development of our new GPX replacement gold detector, to be released in FY21;" So, it is indeed intended as a 4500/5000 replacement, maybe SDC too. And if it's in the premium end of the product portfolio, I have to grudgingly assume it's going to be inordinately expensive. From the CEO address at the annual meeting on Oct 28th. "We continue to accelerate the pace of innovation in Minelab. Over the past two years we have moved from simultaneously developing three new metal detecting products to six, which has increased the frequency of new product releases to the market." I haven't kept track of what they are working on or have released in the coin/relic and military world. Aside from the 6000, does that leave room for any other new detectors being developed in that "six" new metal detecting products?
    2 points
  9. Looks to be pot metal to me. Not very good definition in it's appearance. Maybe a fantasy ring? GaryC/Oregon Coast
    2 points
  10. Hey all, I got up to Treasure Coast for a couple of hunts, to break in my new/used Equinox! I haven't had one for a few months, but i got back into it in a hurry! The area is always full of detectorists for any rare erosion event, and this past week was no different! The blue erosion bags are a main indicator of the level of erosion present! Normally they are covered by up to several feet of sand! The orange sand is the original sand we look for, when looking for the old stuff! Last friday was the better of the two days i was there! I found a few pieces of lead, iron, copper, and modern coins! For a few lucky hunters, there were musket ball's and spent bullets! There were a few coin and artifact finds, but those were on various other beaches nearby! The highlight of this trip was recognizing, than meeting a local legend here; Terry Shannon, a super nice, very experienced detectorist, and author! He has a few very good books out on Amazon! He was my best "find" of the day! I also went Monday, but i caught the tide incoming, and just got beat up by the big waves, with very few targets! But i will keep going there, whenever i get the chance, to finally find some of the elusive and rare Spanish items!👍👍
    2 points
  11. Gary, That's where all the item's i detected where found this time! I figure that they act like riffles for gold! But things also get blasted out of these areas, back up near the cliff, or washed out to the water! Okara, There are two different colors that i have seen! The blue one's run about a half mile, and are only here, as far as i know! The white one's I've only seen in front of one house! 👍👍
    2 points
  12. The is the best news I have heard in a while. Peoples safety is more important then getting my AQ. The second best new is when my number comes up.
    2 points
  13. Thanks VL, I was using the TDI Beach Hunter. Like the AQ it hits the low conductors pretty well.
    2 points
  14. The Minelab ML-80 headphone is made by another company and sold under other brand names. The Miccus Stealth SR-71 has been a popular alternative. Unfortunately an update has possibly made the latest version of these headphones incompatible with the Minelab Equinox. From this ad: "IMPORTANT NOTE FOR METAL DETECTOR USE: The current SR-71 Bluetooth 5.0 release DOES NOT work with metal detecting equipment. The reviews are citing earlier 4.2 versions of the headphones." This also for the Miccus website: "Are different brands of Bluetooth products compatible? Yes. Bluetooth manufacturers are required to make their Bluetooth products compatible with all other Bluetooth devices; failure to meet this requirement means products cannot legally display the Bluetooth logo. Just because a device is Bluetooth enabled, however, does not mean it supports the A2DP stereo music profile. All Miccus Bluetooth products support A2DP and will only work with other Bluetooth devices that support the A2DP profile as well."
    1 point
  15. The White's XLT metal detector was introduced in 1994 as the Spectrum XLT. It was cosmetically refashioned as the XLT E-Series in 2001 and finally discontinued in 2010. The XLT is a 6.59 kHz VLF metal detector aimed primarily at coin, jewelry, and relic detecting. "XLT® is high-performance simplicity and versatility at it’s best. High tech treasure hunting is as easy as turning on the XLT® and selecting a Turn-on and Go! program. With 5 expertly-designed programs to choose from, you’ve got virtually every kind of hunting covered. It’s easy to enhance a program, too, for your particular hunting with one of 10 Basic Adjustments or even a Professional Option. Completely automatic or totally adjustable!" Source: White's 2006 catalog White's Spectrum XLT metal detector White's XLT control panel 5 Turn-on-and-Go! Programs - ready to hunt right out of the box. Completely automatic, professionally engineered for high performance. 10 Basic Adjustments Adjust every aspect of your hunting. Popular adjustments include Tone I.D., Silent Search, Fade Rate, Block Edit, and AutoTrac® Speed. 29 Pro Options Complete Visual Display. Target icons, VDI numbers and White’s exclusive SignaGraph® target signature. Flip the trigger and activate the depth screen. Automatic Ground Balance with AutoTrac®. Tracks and adjusts to changing grounds as you hunt. High Definition megapixel display. Powerful, waterproof 9 1/2” search coil. Slide-in Nicad Battery System. Up to 15 hrs. of power-packed hunting on one charge. Backup penlight pack also included. Two-year Parts and Labor Warranty. White's XLT Owner's Manual White's Metal Detector Forum
    1 point
  16. The GPX 6000 is a new gold prospecting metal detector from Minelab. The Minelab GPX 6000 is a pulse induction (PI) gold nugget detector, featuring a lightweight, well-balanced, rainproof package, coil options, built in wireless headphone capability, and quick release Li-Ion rechargeable batteries. See the specifications below for details. The Minelab GPX 6000 is powered by the all new GeoSense-PITM technology, which analyzes and responds to ground signals with great clarity and precision. Now you can detect difficult environments once thought undetectable. GeoSense-PITM technology rapidly suppresses unwanted signals via three overlapping feedback systems for superfast detection of all gold pieces. The GPX 6000 has three search coils available, an 11" round mono, a 17" elliptical mono, and a 14" round DD coil. The coils are not compatible with other GPX coils, having an entirely different connector. The Minelab GPX 6000 will be packaged with different coils in different regions. The Africa model will come with the 11" mono and 17" elliptical coils, plus two batteries. The U.S. model will instead include the 11" mono and 14" DD coils, and a single battery. Mains and DC charging adapters are included, as well as the new Minelab ML 100 wireless headphones. NEW! - Minelab GPX 6000 Video Training Series Minelab GPX 6000 gold nugget detector MINELAB GPX 6000 FEATURES POWERED BY GeoSense-PITM - GeoSense-PITM technology quickly and precisely analyzes gold signals buried in the ground, so you'll be able to ear all gold pieces clearly and accurately. FIND ALL GOLD - Built by the world leader in metal detection technology, Minelab's GPX 6000TM is the fastest, lightest and simplest way to find all types of gold in one machine - from tiny pieces of gold to that elusive 'retirement' nugget. EASY EXPERT - With automatic features and an easy-to-use interface, you'll be an expert at finding gold from the moment you turn on your GPX 6000TM. Because Automatic Ground Balance continuously adapts to changing soil conditions as you swing your detector over the ground, there's no need to adjust any settings. Finding gold has never been easier. LIGHTER SWING - The GPX 6000TM weighs only 2.1 kg (4.6 lbs) with the 11" mono coil and 2.3 kg (5.1 lbs) with the 14" DD coil. The GPX 6000TM features light carbon fiber shafts, streamlined control box, and signature U-FlexTM armrest - detect longer and feel comfortable doing it. With a Li-Ion quick-release rechargeable battery supplied, you can detect for up to 8 hours on a single charge. BUILT TO LAST - Tested in the harsh environments of the Australian outback, the GPX 6000TM can withstand extreme heat and heavy rains. A 3 year warranty is included, backed by Minelab's global support. CHOICE OF COILS - The GPX 6000TM includes a versatile 11" Monoloop coil for tight spaces and pinpointing tiny gold pieces, and a large 14" Double-D coil to detect gold accurately even in salty environments (both coils waterproof to 1 m / 3.3'). LOUD AND CLEAR AUDIO - Whether listening to the 'loud and clear' external speaker or the supplied wireless Bluetooth headphones, you'll never miss out on the sound of gold with the GPX 6000TM. MINELAB GPX 6000 SPECIFICATIONS Search Modes / Ground Type - Difficult (Default) / Normal Double-D Modes - EMI Cancel (Default) / Conductive Ground Cancel Ground Balance - Auto / Manual (Quick-Trak) Noise Cancel - Auto Sensitivity - Manual (Levels 1-10) / Auto (Level 11) /Auto+ (Level 12) Threshold Tone - On / Off Volume - 5 Levels Length Extended - 145 cm / 57 inches Length Collapsed - 76 cm / 30 inches Weight - 2.1 kg / 4.6 lbs (with 11" mono coil) Display - Monochrome LCD with Backlight (Low, Med, High, Off) Audio Output - In-built Speaker / Wired 3.5mm (1/8") Headphone Jack Wireless - Bluetooth aptX Low Latency Supplied Headphones - ML 100 Wireless Headphone Supplied Battery - Quick Release Li-Ion Battery, 5833 mAH Chargers - AC Mains Charger & 12V Battery Clip Cable Included Battery Runtime - Approximately 8 Hours Supplied Search Coils - GPX11 11" Round Mono & GPX14 14" Round DD Optional Search Coils - GPX17 17" Elliptical Mono Waterproof - Coils Submersible to 1 meter / 3.3 feet and Detector Splash / Rain Proof Key Technologies - GeoSense PITM / Bluetooth / aptX Low Latency Minelab GPX 6000 User Manual Minelab GPX 6000 Accessories & Spare Parts Minelab GPX 6000 Video Training Series Minelab Metal Detector Forum Note: Minelabs GPX 6000 features three coil options: the GPX11 11" monoloop coil for versatile gold hunting, the GPX14 14" Double-D coil to detect gold accurately even in salty environments, and the GPX17 17" elliptical coil, to find large gold nuggets at greater depth. All coils are waterproof to 1 meter (3 feet). Early information indicates the Africa model will come with the 11" mono and 17" elliptical coils, while the U.S. model will instead include the 11" round mono and 14" round DD coils. Minelab GPX 6000 control summary Bluetooth® Control Enables Bluetooth® for connection of wireless headphones - Initiates Bluetooth® pairing mode for connecting Bluetooth® headphones (long press for at least 2.5 seconds). Backlight Adjust Cycles through the backlight brightness settings - High, medium, low and off Power On/Off - Turns the detector on and off - Restores factory default settings (press and hold from off for at least 7 seconds). Sensitivity Adjust - Adjusts the sensitivity level. Ground Type - Toggles between Difficult and Normal Ground Type. Toggles between the Threshold On / Off settings (long press for at least 2.5 seconds). Noise Cancel - Initiates the Noise Cancel process. When a Double‑D coil is connected, toggles between the Double‑D Modes — EMI Cancel and Conductive Ground Cancel (long press for at least 2.5 seconds). Volume Adjust - Adjusts the audio Volume Level. Quick‑Trak - Press and hold Quick‑Trak Ground Balance to conduct a Ground Balancing operation. Minelab GPX 6000 relative performance Minelab GPX 6000 control closeup
    1 point
  17. Hey everyone! Its been a while since i posted last. Recently i did a comparison video of the Proline and Keene full size 4 inch dredges. It think it is a great resource for those looking to buy a dredge in the near future. I go through each component and talk about my reasoning and though process behind why one is preferred over the other. This is definitely not a video for fanboys of either brand lol. The main point of it is to get potential dredge buyers thinking about there intended use of the dredge and how various features on either one may be better for there intended use. Hope yall enjoy and please leave any feed back. Discussions are the reason im here !
    1 point
  18. Haha...I had one of those, the guy lost her ring and they were married 30 year when I returned her ring.
    1 point
  19. More information would be helpful, such as: 1) What Equinox mode and what frequency? What sensitivity/gain setting? 2) Did you ground balance (i.e. automatic or ground grab or manual)? 3) Which coil were you using? 4) Was your hole large enough to get the coil into? Wide enough to sweep the coil? 5) Did you use the detector's pinpoint function to estimate the lateral size of the object? 6) When the coil was still on/at the surface level, how many bars showed on the strength/depth meter? 7) Were you using a handheld pinpointer, and if so, did it ever sound-off on the target (i.e. after digging to the max depth)?
    1 point
  20. There is one market segment in recreational detectors that Minelab does not have a model to cover - a PI beach machine for dry sand, wet sand and wading. Either the GPX6000 will have a beach mode(s) - much like Equinox 800 is primarily a coin/relic machine with a gold mode tacked on so GPX6000 will be gold machine with a beach mode - all of a sudden you have two detectors in one and the very high price become easier to justify or they will have a dedicated PI beach machine. Im sure there is a Minelab white board somewhere with Fisher AQ Impulse written on it and a lot of brainstorming notes around it.
    1 point
  21. The MS-3 standalone and MS-3 with Z-Lynk module headphones both have low battery indicator LEDs on the left side of the power button. If it starts flashing, 3 hours or so are left. I just charge them once a week or so. They do seem to last 20 to 30 hours on one charge. Some of my bluetooth headphones have warning chimes when there is 1 hour or so left which to me is good since I definitely will not see the LED on my Garretts blinking when they are on my head. Otherwise, the MS-3s are really nice.
    1 point
  22. I would like to see a "smart detector". One that becomes more intelligent the more you use it. Collecting data about each target and using an algorithm for a more accurate ID. Soil condition, reactive signal, resistive or loss component, shape and strength of the eddy current are just some of the factors that determine the ID of an object. These could be captured and after digging up the target, the user would input what the target was. Perhaps a secondary number like the ctx 3030 would then display what the target would be based on past targets. The machine would become "smarter" the more it is used. I'm not asking for too much am I? 😝
    1 point
  23. Sounds like that will be a great detector for guys just getting into nugget prospecting. But it does not sound like it will be something productive for going over old patches, if they are just using similar tech as the current issues. Wait and see I guess...
    1 point
  24. Looks like novelty jewelry probably pewter or if it is plated at all then zinc. Cross itself looks to be a color fill.
    1 point
  25. I believe that their plan for the Final AQ version release is April ‘21. My own opinion on whether that date will hold is not relevant.
    1 point
  26. Here is a bit more history about Southern California gold. You have to read about a little bit of 'other' history but there are some gems in this article for local gold prospectors. https://signalscv.com/2020/11/the-time-ranger-special-clint-mckinney-tom-frew-issue/ MORE TALES OF SCV GOLD — We keep adjusting our calendars about the first discovery of gold in California and Santa Clarita. For years, the date of the first major gold strike was thought to be in 1842 in Placerita Canyon by don Francisco Lopez. Other reports place that date even earlier in San Francisquito Canyon in the 1820s. In a conversation with The Signal by Judge John Powell, who served as magistrate here for 50 years in the 19th and early 20th centuries, that first gold discovery was even earlier. According to Powell, from a conversation he reportedly had with Andres Pico (of Pico Canyon fame and brother to California Gov. Pio Pico), Piute Indians found large gold nuggets in the Placerita Creek all the way back in 1796. (That would be the same year as the Lost Padre Mine in Castaic, where millions were taken out in gold.) The exact location was described as “… in the bedrock of the narrows in Placerita Canyon, 4 miles from (downtown Newhall).” The Indians brought them to the padres at the brand new construction site of the San Fernando Mission. The missionaries built rockers and sluice boxes and mined the gold. According to The Signal of Nov. 19, 1920, “No one seems to know just how much gold was mined, but it is supposed to have been a considerable sum.” THE GOLD MINE THAT WOULD NOT GO AWAY — Annie Rose Briggs rediscovered the historic Lost Padre Mine northeast of Castaic. The cave had originally been discovered by Indians and had been worked by padres and their neophytes, pulling out $3 million in gold from 1843 and on. The mine was boarded up and hidden by the padres and rumor is they hid the gold in the hills rather than give it to the Mexican government. A Dr. Bragg later “rediscovered” the pit, trading a thoroughbred horse for the location. Dr. Bragg hired a local Newhall gunfighter, Bronco Charley Riley, to manage it. Riley’s crew mined an additional $1 million from it. One day, in a drunken rage, Riley murdered eight Indian miners and buried them in the cave. He threatened to kill Dr. Bragg, too, saying he was tired of doing all the work and the horse-racing doctor getting all the money. Dr. Bragg, fearing for his life, never returned to his own mine. A few days later, Bronco Charley was sleeping off a drunk in a clapboard lean-to shack when someone snuck up on the cabin, stuck a shotgun through a hole in the wall and just about blew Riley’s head clean off. Most of the gold and silver was gone from the cache, but there was a rich vein of quartz that Mrs. Briggs made a comfortable profit from. ANNIE’S GOLD, PART II — Just for the record, my good pal Clint McKinney and his dad rediscovered the Lost Padre in 1968, working for an elderly Annie Briggs. When they showed her the entrance, she fired them on the spot, then blew the place to smithereens.
    1 point
  27. No, it looks like a normal eagle. It does have a little shield type thing under the eagle.
    1 point
  28. Well, not sure what you mean by AT/GB? Since I have owned the Nox I have always run a secondary program against my Auto/tracking program on "iffy" signals. NOT ONE program to date including the CJC -9 GB program to the "0" fixed program have been able to beat the "auto/tracking" program. I was in the process of another program comparison when my time was cut short. Hoping to get back on the machine soon. I have found everything from rings to chains. Dave
    1 point
  29. I would think the finds would be around the bags in the depressions, just a thought. GaryC/Oregon Coast
    1 point
  30. Spent a nice day at the beach chasing the tide out. Only found about 8 coins but 3 rings (1 gold, 2 silver), a thin silver chain with silver name tags and a large copper bracelet. When I tried to untangle the silver chain it broke in a couple of places and when cleaning the bracelet I knocked out some mother of pearl inlay. The gold band is stamped 14K and weighs 4 grams. Not the biggest ring but a beautiful sight lying in the wet sand. The bracelet is stamped "Mexico cobre". Cobre is Spanish for copper. Not valuable but a different and fun find. GL&HH!
    1 point
  31. Thanks Joe. Your battery had a lot to do with it. I was able to do what I wanted, when I wanted and not worry about battery time. I think that my decision making prior was based on odds of finding things instead of instinct. So far I ran the battery twice for a total of 8 hours. I'll probably charge it only because I don't like swapping batteries midstream.
    1 point
  32. Thanks GBA, You are spot on. I actually found the other part of the rosary a couple weeks ago. It is stamped Italy but it looks like tungsten carbide. Ironically, I found both parts of the rosary where I have been searching for the matching half of the Cartier bracelet I found last month so I think that it's a good sign! I think that the copper bracelet was lost in the surf like most of my recent finds. I've been focusing on hunting farther out during the lower tides.
    1 point
  33. Love the Monster and have learned to adjust to most of it's short comings. With that said....the improvement I'd really enjoy is a two tone machine so I don't have to spend as much time watching the screen. jmo
    1 point
  34. Yes guys, to avoid any confusion, all the nuggets pictured so far in this post were found by yours truly.🙂
    1 point
  35. I wasn't able to take advantage of the great beach conditions this past weekend but I hunted yesterday to see if there were any stragglers left behind. There weren't a whole lot of good targets but I did find about $1.50 in clad, 2 rings, 2 cheap chains and a fair amount a lightweight trash. One of the rings was stainless steel but the other was a hefty sterling silver ring of 14+ grams. Pretty sure that this ring had been there a while because of the tarnish and it was a little bent from tumbling in the rocks, I presume. http://metaldetectingforum.com/picture.php?albumid=832&pictureid=82490http://metaldetectingforum.com/picture.php?albumid=832&pictureid=82491 I would have loved to have found some gold but at least the silver is interesting and a sign that the gold could have still been within reach. Maybe next time! http://metaldetectingforum.com/images/smilies/yes.gif __________________
    1 point
  36. As Steve, Monte, and others have stated in this thread, I can 100% emphasize how critical a proper ground balance on the Equinox (or any machine with ground balance capabilities) will make on how you hear a deep, masked target. If your ground balance is not properly set to the ground you’re detecting, a deep target may not even ID (audibly/visually) to a level that would make you aware you even had a target to dig. I always ground balance my Equinox immediately after power up, and as I detect from one area of my turf location to another, I‘ll repeat the ground balance. I never leave my GB in auto. I lock it. I hunt in very trashy ground, and I feel auto GB would be detrimental to my hunting of deeper targets. I’ve hunted for over a decade with my ML Explorer, and know quite well how detrimental “auto” sensitivity was on that machine in trashy/noisy ground, thus I always used manual sens. This same logic on GB also holds true with EMI and the Noise Channel setting. Being on a noise channel that is as EMI-free as possible is critical to the operator in being able to hear those deeper, fainter targets. Most every time I ground balance my machine throughout the day, I will do a noise cancel also. If you can commit to doing/repeating these two steps if your ground/EMI fluctuate, you will be pocketing more keeper targets that others have passed over. Even if you’re not 100% certain a change in Noise Channel and/or GB is warranted, do it anyway....you may be pleasantly surprised! For me, it’s easier to decipher if my Noise Channel is not optimal (if you hear noise in your headphones without moving your coil) but it’s more subtle (for me) when my GB is not optimal...that’s why I GB often throughout the day...another reason I try to do these steps throughout my hunts is I typically hunt turf that has been hunted by myself and quite a few local hunters countless times over the decades, so having that “extra edge” in hearing the few deepies left in the areas I hunt (Needles in the haystack) will make/break my hunts. Let’s face it...many of us are hunting heavily pillaged ground anyways...unless your ground has been whited-out from the surface to around 5” (which is highly unlikely), you’re gonna have to hunt at snail pace and from every angle possible, and also at different times of the year (when ground is more saturated and/or when the grass is cut low or is dormant/dry) to eek out those remaining, elusive oldies hiding, patiently waiting to see the light of day again! 😃 I also read that someone said Iron Bias affects depth of the machine. I haven’t noticed that, but definitely sensitivity (Higher value = more depth, obviously) and Recovery Speed (higher value = less depth) are directly proportional to overall depth of your machine. Lastly, and this could probably be a topic/thread on its own, is the cadence of your swing speed...the proper cadence/swing speed of your coil can definitely influence how well/poor you can hear a very deep target...swinging your coil too slow over the ground could make your machine completely pass over a deeper target without any audible/visual indication. The same holds true if you swing your coil too fast over the ground while detecting...it’s gonna take time/hrs/days/months of hunting for some of you to realize this.....but you will eventually. Practice proper swing cadence by swinging over a known, whispery deep target, and monitor how the target sounds based on your swing cadence.
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  37. Good idea on the tags. I haven't found any of them recently.
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  38. When my brother inlaw and I was getting ounces of old 18ct rings upto our waist in the beach, he found these teeths made from gold sovereigns. They were not a matching pair.
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  39. The Carolina Gold Rush kicked off the American lust for finding gold, but the Georgia Gold Rush, also known as the Dahlonega Gold Rush, followed quickly thereafter and was where many of the men from the Carolinas went after the low-hanging fruit had all been panned out of rivers or mined. In terms of national consciousness, the Georgia Gold Rush quickly came to outshine the Carolina Gold Rush, despite the fact that the Carolina region was the powerhouse of American gold until the discovery of gold in California in the mid-19th Century. It all began in 1829 in Lumpkin County, Georgia, situated in the north-central part of the state. This was still relatively untamed at the time, certainly so when compared to the Carolinas. It had long been known that there was gold in this region. The Native Americans told explorers that the small discoveries that they had originated were from the mountains nearby. There is some poorly attested Spanish and French gold mining in the region dating back to the colonial period, but nothing significant to speak of. However, there is an open question of why the gold crazy Spanish would have abandoned these mines. This means that the Spanish either never found gold or weren’t very good at extracting it and considered the area to be a bit of a dead-end, though the former is much more plausible. The connection between the Georgia Gold Rush and the Carolina Gold Rush is more than just temporal and geographic. It is, in fact, the very same vein of gold that runs throughout the region. So in a sense, the Georgia Gold Rush can be seen as a sub-gold rush of the Carolina Gold Rush — an echo of it, as it were. How Did the Georgia Gold Rush Start? Unlike the Carolina Gold Rush, no one is positive who first struck gold in the region. Some of the most popular versions of events are that a man named Frank Logan (or, in some tellings, his slave) first discovered the gold in White County, Georgia at Duke’s Creek. Others say that the gold was indeed found in White County at Duke’s Creek, but that it was found by John Witherood rather than Frank Logan. Other’s say Jesse Hogan, fresh from prospecting in North Carolina first struck near Dahlonega, Georgia, at Ward’s Creek. Another version of the Duke’s Creek theory has Thomas Bowen first discovering gold sitting in the roots of a tree overblown by a story. Finally, others say that Benjamin Parks celebrated his birthday in 1828 by striking gold walking along a deer path, choosing to lease the land from Reverend O’Barr with his business partner, Joel Stephens. The problem with all of these theories is that there is no contemporaneous document to verify any of them. The historical record is nonexistent as to who first kicked off the Georgia Gold Rush. There might have been contemporaneous accounts, but they have been lost to the sands of time, leaving us to simply speculate about which or another theory of who first found gold there might be more plausible. Whoever it was that first struck gold in Georgia in 1828, we do know that the gold rush itself began in earnest in 1829. On this, we have some evidence in the historical record. A notice ran on August 1, 1829, in the Georgia Journal (a newspaper for the Milledgeville community) declared that there were two mines in the area and that men were seeking their fortunes there. At around the same time, the Macon Telegraph reported discoveries in the winter of 1829 and 1830. This report isn’t simply about gold being found, but about an influx of men into the region to mine, representing a contemporaneous account not just of finding gold, but of the Georgia Gold Rush itself. The Gold Boom Carroll County, Georgia was the next site of gold discovery in 1830. Much of this was found on land that was, at least in theory, owned by the Cherokee people. However, this did not stop miners of European extraction from descending upon the region in search of treasure. Lumpkin, White, Union, and Cherokee counties became overwhelmed with prospectors hunting for gold. Most of this was placer mining. Contemporary accounts put a whopping 4,000 miners just at the Yahoola Creek site. In a single area north of Blairsville, there were over 300 ounces of gold being found every day. In 1830 alone, the Philadelphia Mint received $212,000 in gold from Georgia. By 1830, there were between 6,000 and 10,000 miners working between the Chestatee River and the Etowah River. Boomtowns such as Auraria and Dahlonega sprung up as a result of the Georgia Gold Rush. Dahlonega alone is said to have had as many as 15,000 miners during the height of the gold rush. For context, the 10th largest city in America in 1830, Southwark, Pennsylvania, had barely 20,000 residents that same year. Needless to say, this influx of Americans working in the mines that were springing up throughout the entire North Georgia region created a lot of tension with the Cherokee who nominally owned the area. The tension came to a head in what is known popularly as the Trail of Tears — the forced migration of the Cherokee people from their ancestral lands in North Georgia and vicinity to what was then known as “Indian Country” in present-day southwest Oklahoma. Many of the Cherokee people continue to live in this region to this day. Indeed, the Indian Removal Act of 1830 is a direct result of the American lust for gold on land that had been occupied by the Cherokee people. The Cherokee turned to the court system to attempt to protect themselves from this forced removal from their lands. And, indeed, the Supreme Court found in their favor in Worcester v. Georgia in 1832. This recognized the Cherokee as a sovereign nation. However, in one of the most famous Presidential actions of all time, Andrew Jackson simply ignored the order saying “John Marshall has made his decision; now let him enforce it.” That same year, the Philadelphia Mint received half a million dollars in gold from Georgia equivalent to $15.1 million in 2020 dollars. The State of Georgia held the Georgia Gold Lottery in 1832. This was the seventh such land lottery. Tickets were sold for $10 each. To be eligible, one needed to be a bachelor over the age of 18 who had resided within Georgia for the last three years and were citizens of the United States. The same rules except for the age limit applied to orphans, married men, and widowers. Excluded from the lottery were previous winners of lotteries, convicted felons, anyone who had mined or profited from mining on former Cherokee territories prior to June 1, 1830, and members of “a horde of Thieves known as the Pony Club.” A second lottery for the remaining lands was held in 1833. By 1838, Georgia was producing so much gold that the Dahlonega Mint began operation. This was particularly poor timing because gold in the region began to “play out” by the 1840s, meaning that there wasn’t much gold left to be mined at all, let alone by inexperienced amateurs with crude tools. Much more sophisticated and intensive efforts would be required to get the remainder of the gold out of the ground. The Decline and Fall of the Georgia Gold Rush The assayer of the Dahlonega Mint, M. F. Stephenson, implored miners not to leave for California from the steps of the local courthouse as they prepared to leave for the Golden State. “Why go to California? In that ridge lies more gold than man ever dreamt of. There’s millions in it.” His pleas largely fell on deaf ears. The California Gold Rush put a final end to the Georgia Gold Rush as it did to many other areas of mining in the United States at the time. There was a sharp decrease in the number of men looking for gold or working as professional miners in the region. However, the production of gold from Georgia did not cease — not by a long shot. Hydraulic mining and blast mining were the preferred methods rather than panning or placer mining. All told, 37 counties boasted 500 working mines until the beginning of the Civil War, which largely brought gold mining in the region to a halt, as men were needed both to fight and to equip the Confederate Army. After the war, mining began anew at some of the older mines and several were reopened during the Great Depression when the Federal government needed gold so badly that it confiscated it from American citizens under penalty of prison for those who did not comply. Commercial production of gold in Georgia finally came to a close in the mid-20th Century, but there had been a lot of work done before then: The entire state of Georgia produced 870,000 troy ounces (24,000 kilograms) of gold between the first discovery in 1828 and when commercial production ceased. But what of the Cherokee? While their removal from their ancestral lands was certainly a tragedy for this Native American tribe, they left with their knowledge of how to mine gold intact. This meant that many of them were able to strike it rich in later gold rushes, having experience in something that others were only just learning how to do as they went along. They were represented in both the California Gold Rush of 1849 and the Colorado Gold Rush 10 years later. The town of Cherokee, California is named after the Indian miners who worked claims there. The Cherokee weren’t the only ones who applied their experience to the Colorado Gold Rush. Indeed, there were men such as Lewis and Samuel Ralston who went west to try to find gold, came up empty-handed, and went back east to Colorado where they remembered deposits of placer gold on the way out to California. Famed prospector William Greeneberry Russell led a crew of men from Georgia and the Cherokee Nation back to modern-day Denver where they ran a successful mining operation for many years. Golden, Colorado is named not for the gold that was found there, nor the hue of the sky at sunset, but the Georgia miner Thomas L. Golden. Outside of California and Colorado, four miners known as “the Georgians” were instrumental in the founding of Montana state capital Helena because they found placer gold there, which led to the settlement of the region. Those interested in the history of the region will find no shortage of tourist attractions appealing to interest in Georgia’s mining past. The Crisson Mine, located in the heart of the Georgia Gold Belt is open for visitors who wish to try their hand at panning for whatever gold might be left. Like other American gold rushes, the Georgia Gold Rush has left its impact not just on the economics of the nation, but also its demography. In the case of the Cherokee, it might be said that it was the most important event in their history. While no one knows how it all began, we know how it ended. The days of Georgia as a gold mining powerhouse of the American economy might be firmly in the past, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t deposits there still to be found. With the right equipment, you might even find that your modest plot of land is home to significant deposits of gold. The Geogia Gold Rush originally appeared on kellycodetectors.com.
    1 point
  40. Welcome, little_fellow! There is also silver in your province. Check out posts made by fellow Ontario resident Jim Hemmingway in which he shows pictures of his native silver finds and talks about his adventures. https://www.detectorprospector.com/search/?&q=silver&author=Jim Hemmingway&search_and_or=and&sortby=relevancy
    1 point
  41. Despite the bad weather i headed to the storm just to test my newly purchase waterproof jacket.Wind ,rain ,sand flying like out of a sand blaster...... i had it all. But i was warm and dry ,Machine was acting a bit funny because i think of the too many ground mineralisation changes(as mentioned in a another post) i tried different setting but it was tough ,managed few targets nonetheless but a pretty poor ratio for 3hours of detecting ........beach is hunted daily so i am not faulting the machine. The pin was dug knowing it was iron 100% just for the fun Enjoy RR
    1 point
  42. Who would want that idiot as an advisor?
    1 point
  43. BTW, another issue I have found is that the ML and Miccus phones allow you to set up 2 profiles so that the phones can pair with both the detector and also with your cell phone should you choose to do that. ML even references that in the manual. I have found that can sometimes be problematic if the phones decide to connect with your cell phone FIRST then sometimes they become invisiible to the Equinox and will not reconnect even if previously paired. Sometimes folks don't realize that they have paired the headphones with their cell phones and I have had to try to help folks unscrew that situation. Just another reason to keep it simple out there when using the wireless detecting accessories unless you really know your away around bluetooth pairing and some of the intricacies. When it works it is great, when it doesn't it can be a real source of frustration in the field.
    1 point
  44. Phrunt, I thought it was possible that perhaps this could be the case also, but one thing I can confirm is that I spoke on the phone with someone having trouble pairing their Miccus 5.0 headphones. They had a recently purchased EQX. After we stepped through the pairing process together, the headphones paired with no issues. That is NOT to say that none of these pairing issues reside within the EQX units themselves; I have a friend with an Equinox that has to go through the FULL pairing process EVERY time he turns on his machine (i.e. the machine is not "remembering" the fact that he has paired his headphones before, and therefore pairing up quickly -- which should be the case after the initial pairing process). So, it seems to be something quirky with his machine. Along those lines, I have also heard of others who can't get their headphones to pair (ML80, or other versions of BT80 phones), and Minelab had to replace the control box. So, there is that issue on occasion, as well -- which "muddies the water" in terms of figuring out exactly what the issue is, when there is a pairing problem. The bottom line though, is that I'm pretty sure at this point that 5.0 Bluetooth headphones will work properly with the EQX, and that most if not all of the pairing issues are either "user error," in the pairing process, or an actual problem with either the headphones, or the Equinox, themselves. The last thing I will say, is, ALL Bluetooth 5.0 products are required to be "backwards compatible" with earlier Bluetooth devices, as I understand it. SO, a Bluetooth 5.0 headphone receiving a Bluetooth 4.1 transmission (i.e. from an Equinox, for instance) are supposed to work properly, even though they are a newer (5.0) version Bluetooth than the device they are pairing to. Certain "profiles," that are a part of "Bluetooth 5.0," like the A2DP profile mentioned in Steve H's. post initially, require that BOTH devices are capable of utilizing that profile, and so you won't experience the full benefits of Bluetooth 5.0 unless both devices are Bluetooth 5.0. That's similar to how even though the Equinox transmits aptX-LL, the Bluetooth phones you choose must ALSO support aptX-LL, if you wish to utilize the aptX-LL's improved speed. But, you can still pair, and use, a pair of non-aptX-LL headphones with the Equinox (you won't get the aptX-LL functionality unless BOTH devices support that profile). Bottom line, the basic Bluetooth functionality (i.e. pairing, etc.) should be version independent, between devices. This is my understanding of how all of this works... Steve
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  45. That confirms what I and others (like Steveg) suspected based on side-by-side audio comparisons between the Miccus and ML Phones.
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  46. Outstanding information, RME. Thanks for posting. I was going to call Miccus today, and I still may, but what they told you is essentially what I had figured -- that some customers had issues pairing (for whatever reason), and so Miccus is "offering a disclaimer," just in case. I know that I have had success pairing the 5.0 version to my Equinox, as I said, so I really believe it to be mistakes that some have made in the pairing process that are leading to the issue. I can't figure out a logical reason why the 5.0 would pair with SOME Equinoxes, and not others; I've verified that the 5.0 version of the SR-71s DO PAIR with an Equinox running the latest Minelab firmware version (2.0), as some suspected that maybe Minelab's 2.0 version of firmware caused the Equinox to be incompatible with the Miccus phones (it did not). I also take interest in their note that the SR-71s are more "tuned" to the Equinox's tones/pitches. I can confirm that to be ABSOLUTELY true; several other-branded BT80 phones sound very much superior to the ML80; the ML80 are more "muddy," more "bassy," and less clear on the high tones especially, than the other-branded BT80 phones I've used. It's very noticeable... Steve
    1 point
  47. Re: Miccus SR-71 Stealth wireless headphones Jan 17 at 3:12 PM PrintRaw message Miccus <support@miccus.com> To: Hello Roy - Thanks for asking. Some customers have told us that the Equinox 600 / 800 do not like the Bluetooth 5.0 version of the SR-71 Stealth Headphones. Other customers have told us that they work fine with the Bluetooth 5.0 version of SR-71 Stealth Headphones. I'm not sure which is accurate, but just to be safe, you may want to try a version of headphones that uses Bluetooth version 4.1 or 4.2. All current stock of available SR-71 Stealth Headphones uses Bluetooth version 5.0. The Minelab ML-80 are basically the same headphones, but they are still using an earlier version of Bluetooth. The other only real difference is that we have custom tuned the EQ curve in our headphones so they have a much clearer sound. I hope this helps. Kind Regards, On Fri, Jan 17, 2020 at 2:52 PM RME <@yahoo.com> wrote:
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  48. Hi all, As Chase noted, I DID test a new pair of 5.0 Bluetooth Miccus SR-71 (at least, that's what the label on the packaging said). In my testing, they WOULD pair with my EQX 800 -- no issues at all. I've been working to get to the bottom of this "headphones won't pair" issue that has cropped up on the forum recently, and after testing a set that paired properly, I had concluded that there was no issue pairing them with the Equinox. But then, Miccus started including this disclaimer...Hmm. I will see if I can produce a video showing the Miccus phones, pairing flawlessly with my Equinox, and then post it one the forums. I will also try giving Miccus a call, as I wonder if they haven't put that "disclaimer" on these new SR-71s, simply due to some folks who were having trouble pairing for OTHER reasons (user error, for instance), assumed the issue was the 5.0 Bluetooth, and then contacted Miccus. I do not think that Miccus has actually tested the phones on an Equinox themselves, so I will see if I can't get this cleared up. I have also looked into purchasing a bunch of these BT-80 headphones directly from the manufacturer (not from Miccus, but from the actual factory that produces them), in the 4.1 Bluetooth version that we know FOR CERTAIN will pair with the Equinox, and then offering them for sale through Steve's Detector Rods. However, the factory requires a minimum order quantity of 1000 sets! I "sweet talked" them down on that number, to the best of my ability (LOL), but the smallest number they will sell me is 100 sets, and that's still a big number, given the price per pair (especially since I don't know how many folks would actually be interested in purchasing). I'm still considering... Anyway, I'll offer an update as soon as I can... Thanks! Steve
    1 point
  49. The Miccus product note notwithstanding, DP forum member Steveg (of Steve's Detector Rods) has run a test and has successfully paired a recently purchased BT 5.0 version of the Miccus SR-71's with Equinox as documented here). It is a mixed bag, to be sure, so as always in these tech compatibility situations, your mileage may vary, so buyer beware. If you want to roll the dice, make sure you purchase from a vendor who accepts returns. There are still alternatives out there too such as similar model clone phones from Trond.
    1 point
  50. The DFX300 can be incredibly simple or incredibly complex depending on how you want to use it and how much time you have for tinkering. There are a lot of programs out there for this machine but many of them really don't do a great deal. Remember that many were designed by individuals for the ground they were working on. There really isn't a "one size fits all" program. Even though the DFX300 is getting on for 11-12 years old...or at least the newer version is which is the one I have, it can still easily match and in some cases surpass the high end detectors of today. Sure there have been improvements in user interface, battery life and weight but at it's core, detection depths have not changed much and recovery rates although very good on modern machines can be matched by adjustments in the DFX. It won't be for everyone but if you are looking for a good used machine for relatively little money and that will work superbly on both wet sand and inland sites you could do a lot worse than get hold of a DFX300.
    1 point
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