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Showing content with the highest reputation on 12/31/2020 in all areas

  1. These are my two best finds ever with a metal detector. A John Adams Cufflink and a George Washington Inaugural button...
    15 points
  2. I'm sorry for this silence but I've been out a lot of time, busy at work with deliveries... Months ago I was in a sort of "bubble", unable to take a smart choice on my next instrument for the future... Thanks to some angels here, I found the way to see the light again and the shine too some days ago... I just wanna say here that I wish Happy new year to all of You and a brotherly hug from Italy. Skull
    14 points
  3. Hi Folks, Thought I would start a thread showing my first attempt at an analog detector, I've been working in the electronics field for many years mostly in the analog/rf area. Hope everyone enjoys the process, and any input or suggestions would be appreciated. I'll try and post as I go along, but this is my after hours hobby, so updates may come every few weeks. I apologize if this goes overboard on the images. So here goes..... Here is the overall unit, the display will tip up and turn on. Closeup of the display Display tipped up, it will show RSSI across the top, and material ID in the center and across the bottom. Control Panel, has gain hi lo, discrimination on off, coil balance, threshold, volume, phone jack, and on off with lo bat indicator. Coil Actual board and display turned on and balanced, I'm sorry for the vertical image I couldn't straighten it up, the coil is under the paper, it's a hand wound 3" OD test coil. Note that this board has only three adjustments and the one in the above renderings has four, this one has no threshold adjust. 1957 silver quarter Gold chain and cross. Aluminum pull tab. Coke bottle cap. Clad quarter. My steel cutters. I'm getting parts in to start putting the new one together, hopefully my updates to the circuit will work out. We have a saying, "may have to shoot the engineer to finish the project", it feels like every other day I come up with another improvement :), anyway I hope you guys enjoy this, I'll post as I go along. -Sun-Boy
    11 points
  4. These are from CA, found several years ago on an isolated high bench. There were nuggets everywhere, despite having been detected by others who didn't know their machines or were swinging too fast. My detecting partner found 3 with his GP Extreme. Found with a GPX 4000 and 17" elliptical NF coil. The nuggets are 4.8 grams total, the speci is 5.6 grams:
    10 points
  5. Hello all! First of all, I just wanted to publicly say thank you to Steve and the rest of the members on this site. Although this is my first post, I have been using the wealth of information gathered from everyone here for a while now. It's that time of year up here in Alaska where the days are dark and the memory of summer seems like a distant past. To cure my deep seated winter time blues and my sense for adventure, I decided to check out a spot I have been wanting to try for a while now, but let the myriad of summertime activities get in the way. But perhaps the real underlying driving force for this trip was my new highbanker waiting patiently in the garage to process dirt. Whatever the REAL reason, I looked at the forecast and saw a balmy 26 degrees forecasted and knew it was time to shine. So I drove North of Anchorage with my back country cross country skis (say that ten times fast) in tow, looking forward to a day out in the back country. I have found that if my main objective is to get out and enjoy the outdoors with a side chance of pay dirt, I am rarely if ever disappointed. And this day was no different. I arrived and strapped on the skis and my touring sled and set off into the snow. I quickly found out that hauling equipment by skis should be an Olympic event. The powder was easily three feet deep and probably pushing on four, making me earn every "stride". In reality, the snow was so deep and the sled so heavy that my skis weren't gliding at all, but being used more like elongated snowshoes, trudging through the snow. But the temperature was warm and snacks aplenty, so I trotted along the creek ahead encountering open water in places and crossing precarious snow bridges at times in order to make my way along. Just around the moment where I realized that I may be in for more of a workout than I intended, I had arrived. Located a few miles downstream was a section of the creek forced into a ninety degree bend by an outcrop of ancient gold bearing glacial till. During the summer months this "creek" (creek only in name) produces too swift of a current to properly explore this bend. But thanks to mother nature, winter freeze up reduces this section to a little more than a shin deep trickle. (The section of glacial till forcing the creek into a perfect ninety degree bend. The creek erodes alongside this till and prevents any debris from accumulating at the base.) (The creek encountering the glacial till and being turned at a sharp ninety degree angle, causing a major drop in water velocity.) As I considered this to be more of an exploratory trip on skis I had left my waders at home, preventing me from properly getting out in the channel. What I settled for instead was balancing myself on the edge of the ice as close as possible (not recommended) and shoveling a few scoops of dirt from the pool formed at the base of the till and into my bucket from the area that I could reach. Realizing that I had all that skiing back left to do, with darkness quickly advancing, I hurriedly filled half a bucket from mostly surface gravels and raced the darkness back to my car. Now for the fun! With dirt in hand and back home in the comforts of a heated garage, I was ready to test out my new 6 inch highbanker. Now let me preface this with some information. This highbanker is not meant to be loaded into a vehicle and dropped off at your spot of choosing. This highbanker is made to tear down and fit inside your pack and hiked into your spot of choosing. Weighing in at only six pounds, this highbanker fits a niche group for those wanting to pack out their operation on foot. And let me tell you what, I am extremely excited to do just that this summer with this bad boy. Made by Gold Rat Engineering out of Australia, this highbanker tears down to nuts and bolts and runs off of a 2,000 GPH electric bilge pump. Coupled with a lithium ion battery (less weight), you can have this set up packed out in the backcountry at 10lbs. While I realize that using an ultra lightweight 6 inch backpack highbanker out of your garage is like using a Ferarri to drive to the corner store, that's exactly what occurred. Running the half bucket that I brought back, the highbanker took it in stride and I soon found myself wishing that I had brought more back (the soreness in my quads reminded me otherwise). I panned out the concentrates from the lower mat (which can be detached and not brought into the field, making it even smaller and lighter) and found it LOADED with black sand. But not a single speck of gold. (The highbanker uses a matting called the Dream Mat) Feeling a little disheartened I ran the top mat, not expecting much after the lower mat didn't produce. Again, LOADED with black sand. And as I panned it back, gold! Now I realize it's not much (it was only half a bucket and ten minutes of digging in all fairness) but what I was really impressed with was the capture rate of the highbanker and the fines of the gold it was able to capture. Some of this stuff was the definition of fly poop. And for it to capture all of that in the top mat without any getting to the lower, I'll take it. So overall, I am extremely happy with this new highbanker and look forward to using it this summer out in the backcountry of Alaska. I am happy with the quick results of the spot I tested out. With a little more effort I believe it will produce some decent results. Once it hits 33 degrees I am taking the highbanker out there to really run some dirt. (Although a suction dredge would be the best tool for this location). But the biggest takeaway was being able to shake the wintertime blues, enjoy the outdoors, and remind myself that springtime prospecting isn't as far off as it sometime feels. Once again I want to thank this community for the knowledge and expertise you all have shared and hope that my short trip report reminds everyone that better panning days are ahead (looking at you 2021). Happy New Years, -Brandon
    10 points
  6. Ah ok. So my next best finds were 2 Seated dimes, around 15 Barber dimes, 2 barber Quarters, an SLQ, a Kennedy Silver Half, and lots of Washington quarters, Rosies, and Mercs. Around 25 Indian Head Pennies too. My best relic this year was a beautiful turn of the century Skeleton Key, and my 2nd oldest coin was an 1843 Seated dime.
    5 points
  7. Nice video....I would have titled it "My two best finds so far" cuz you aint finished yet! strick
    4 points
  8. The inside bend, side slope of a desert canyon about 200 feet above the existing stream bed. That's all I can share for now..
    4 points
  9. With the recent big surf and good lunar tides I thought that my last hunt of the year could be a good one. However, It wasn't looking too good after about 4 hours of detecting and I only had about a dozen or so coins when I scooped a darkened silver ring out of the wet sand. The "infinity" design prompted me to look inside the ring hoping to see what I did see- "Tiffany & Co.". Later I added another ring which I thought was silver but it turned out to be plated. I looked up the ring on the Tiffany web site and was surprised at the retail price on these: https://www.tiffany.com/jewelry/rings/tiffany-infinity-ring-GRP08642/ It was a nice way to end the year. Happy New Year everyone!
    4 points
  10. Well, here I am, another year older, and 48 years of metal detecting and gold prospecting under my belt! 2020 has been an odd year for many reasons, the main being the pandemic that has wrecked havoc on life around the planet. The resulting shutdowns and social distancing requirements made this a challenging year for everyone, whether they caught the virus or not. Once I saw where things were headed, I decided to gracefully accept that 2020 would be a good year to just kick back and relax. I did get in some metal detecting during the year, but it has been more about trying out some new detectors than making actual finds. I had a good time and learned a few things, but this was the first year in a long time that I had no specific "adventure" planned for the year. If you look back over my journal, you will see I have done well over the years at making some sort of special prospecting or metal detecting trip each year. This year however it was short day trips, or at most a few overnight outings. Travel did not seem like a good idea this year, especially anything involving airplanes. Some gold found by Steve while metal detecting in 2020 I made finds for the year; gold nuggets, coins, and jewelry. There was no one find however that stands out at all in my mind, more a reflection of how spoiled I am than anything else. In some ways it was a very nice year for me, just taking it easy and having fun. However, I would like to ramp it up for 2021, and I will make the effort in the coming year to try new places and locations more than I did in 2020, which was mostly revisiting old haunts. Happy New Year! ~ Steve Herschbach Copyright © 2020 Herschbach Enterprises Go To Prior Story Journal Index Page
    3 points
  11. Very short but very productive year for me, seeing as I only got to prospect from Oct. - Dec. and only about 8 days during those months. I'll post a few more photos later of my 2020 finds. But enjoy this semi drawn out nugget discovery to recovery 😂
    3 points
  12. Hi all, I (we) are newly retired and setting up for life after covid.... We have been part time prospectors for many years, venturing ut when work permitted and sometimes when work did not permit. 90% of our time has been spent around the Kimberley and Pilbara regions, and whilst there are still patches to be found, the ground is hard on old limbs. We will be heading off in our new van in 21 hopefully to see what the rest of Australia has to offer. Hope to meet some of the Aussie prospectors out there in the never never, swap a few yarns, sip the odd whisky, and show a few nuggets or 2 around the camp fire. Cheers
    3 points
  13. Well, I don't know about the storage size but the number of them is moderate compared to many who post photos here. I like your enthusiasm and "get your hands dirty" effort. "Well begun is half done" and you're past the 'well begun' stage already. My main suggestion is to get a (prototype) unit up and running in the field and save the nicities for later. (That may be your plan already.) Air tests are known to be ideal and you likely will find differences with in-ground targets that lead to modifications. So far the performance appears promising. I look forward to your progress reports.
    3 points
  14. Dug the woman's diamond, 14K (2.1 g) within the first 30 minutes of today's hunt. Got the man's 14K wide band (4.6 g) at about the 3 hour mark in the hunt. Equinox, 15 inch coil, Beach 1, wet sand.
    3 points
  15. Thanks DWD, I've been fortunate enough to find 1 platinum, 1 gold and 5 silver T&Co rings over the past 10 years- all but 1 in the wet sand. I also found a thin chain and heart T&Co silver bracelet but would love to find one of their heftier bracelets.
    3 points
  16. The capability boost by incorporating those few things from the FBS2 detectors that are desirable would only be worth a couple hundred dollars in value to me. More importantly, and probably something that would actually drive cost up (since the above is only programming and signal processing - no impact to power requirements) is improving the build quality and ergonomics by going to full up CF shafts and stems, improving weight and balance, improving the grip and adjustability of the control pod, and finally deciding on making a truly waterproof or simply dunk proof/weatherproof machine rather than trying to split the difference like they did with Equinox(it appears to be mostly dunk proof and submersible if you are lucky and got one that does not have manufacturing/fit-up flaws). I could live with dunk proof (rather than submersible) personally which would be cheaper to design and build. Also not interested in built-in GPS and other half-measure bells and whistles. That would probably put it at the $1200 to 1500 price point, I would say.
    3 points
  17. I Hope you get a gold Tiffany next.In 20 years i have gotten 3 silver ones.A ring in the water,A chain with pendent in the dry sand and a chain with pendent in the turf.I have not got one in about 5 years. My friend has about 3 too.He also got a dry sand trifecta.Gold ,Platinum and silver in 1 day.He is the only one I know who has done it on the dry sand.
    3 points
  18. Thanks Compass! My daughter has already claimed the diamond ring and she usually doesn't care unless it has T & Co on it. LOL Finding a diamond ring that she likes and fits her tiny ring finger has been a real challenge too. Usually if the ring is that small it is not a diamond ring.
    3 points
  19. I went to hunt a local park this morning with my new Etrac. The ground is freezing up here and I wanted to get out before it’s totally frozen. Since I needed 1 more silver to make 100, I went to the oldest park around, from the 1840s. I went out with low expectations, since I know the park has been pounded over the years. After hunting for about an hour and not finding anything I was getting discouraged. As I was about to head back to the car, I got a very deep, VERY iffy high tone. I told myself Hey maybe they missed a rosie or something. So I dug a nice 7 inch plug and in the plug my pinpointer went off: 1 rusty nail. I rechecked the hole and got an even better high tone. I dug down to about 8 or 9 inches and out came another rusty nail. Then the most beautiful 12-45 signal sang into my ears and I eagerly dug down. At 10 and a half inches: Silver coin edge! I carefully took it out of the hole and got out my spray bottle. It seemed oddly thin for a silver quarter. As the dirt came off the coin I could not believe my eyes and yelled “HOLY $!@?” I got a couple of weird looks but I didn’t care. SPANISH SILVER!!!! I threw down my headphones and ran around doing a happy dance. My 100th silver and I could not have asked for a better one. I quickly ran home to clean it. Turns out it’s from the 1730s from the reign of King Philip 5 of Spain! My oldest coin I’ve ever found! What a way to end the year. I could not get any “in situ” pics because I was shaking so bad! But here are some from when I got home. Thanks for looking!
    2 points
  20. I tried finding my previous (2019) summary report and New Year's resolutions but failed. Well, I have the data (from my logs) and I roughly remember my goals -- find some new detecting spots. I left my old heavily searched (by me) schools and parks alone this year and returned to a couple I had barely detected plus one I had never detected. 90% of my year's detecting was spent on this last (previously undetected by me) site. All three yielded silver coins. Not surprisingly I spent most of my year in the one that seemed to be the best producer. I finally retired for good in February (I'd been 50% for the previous 1 1/2 years) and it did lead to more hours in the field, but not large multiples (311 hrs vs. my previous best of 263 hrs). My most noticeable increase in raw numbers was almost doubling my "other old coins" finds, those being pennies before Lincolns, denominations no longer minted (e.g. 2 cent), 5 cent pieces before Jeffersons plus the silver Warnicks, and all higher denominations prior to 1965 -- i.e. the silver years. I keep a separate category for Wheat pennies. My other old coin count (still modest compared to many here, some of you reporting 100 or more for the year) was 43 (previous record 22). I found 103 Wheaties along the way (previous record 90). Most of the increase in the 'others' was from nickels across the board (especially Buffies and Warnicks). Here's a photo of my last 6 month's 'other old coins': No rare or even semi-key date+mintmarks there. Both Indian Head Pennies are from the early 20th century (very common). I can't read the dates on the very badly worn V-nickel and two of the three Buffies (other is 1920 plain). The Jeffie (lower right) doesn't count as "other old coins" but is included because it's a fairly low mintage 1950 plain (not to be confused with the lowest mintage of the series which also came out that year, with Denver mintmark). The silver charm(?), at least I think it's silver, is not marked but I think it's some kind of artisan silver piece -- rather crudely made as you can see. Surprisingly I got very little silver jewelry this year since I dig everything about 20 on the Equinox (i.e. above Zinc pennies). I didn't buy a single detector this during 2020, only a couple coils (both for the Fisher F75). I feel like I learned a lot about using the Equinox but nowhere near everything I'd like to know and apply. Oh, one of the IHP's was found with the Tesoro Vaquero. (Only 9 hrs or about 3% of the year was spent hunting with anything except the Eqx and almost all of it with the 11" coil.) I used to buy a new (or used) detector every 8 or 9 months. The risk (and I paid for it) is not ever really learning one properly before I shelved it for the greener grass on the other side of the hill. I'm not making that mistake with the Equinox. For 2021, my goals/resolutions are the same, but to a higher magnitude. I'm going to find some local old, forgotten sites thru research and at least make an attempt to get permissions (if they are private, which is likely). The pandemic did hinder me a bit in 2020 with no detecting trips out of my local area. I have three promising permissions on hold (a 19th Century picnic/swimming hole, a 19th Century church site, and an 18th Century New England homestead -- none of these has ever been detected according to their owners). I missed getting out west for natural gold searching and ghosttowning. I should at least get to Colorado late spring or early summer for both and maybe Nevada (fingers crossed) again this year. While the weather is uncooperative for detecting I'll do more backyard testing and (finally) learn how to clean my now 294 Wheaties, many with dates currently hiding under the infamous green scale. (Maybe some semi-keys among them -- I hope, I hope.) If I can figure out how to pan in my (heated) workshop without making a mess I'll do some of that on uncooperative winter days as well. I do have some unpanned promising material and don't mind practicing with pseudo-gold (lead flakes), either. I hope all of you're pleased with your 2020 efforts and especially hope you harbor high aspirations for 2021. Happy New Year!
    2 points
  21. Sage advice for nugget shooters from the late, great Jim Straight! I always get excited when I come across the old drywasher tailing piles (dryblower heaps) of long abandoned mining claims in the desert. The efficiency of gold recovery using this dry separation method depends on many factors, including the moisture content of the material, its degree of consolidation, the angle of the riffle box and amount of air flow and vibration. Even if all of these conditions are optimal, recovery is never 100% and some gold inevitably ends up in the tailing piles. So, slow and methodical searching of these areas with the gold detector most always guarantees a few bits being added to the poke. Depending on when these placers were mined, the tailings can be hard to recognize, so carefully observing your surroundings while out in the field for these tell-tale clues to productive areas can really pay off. While the coarse tailings have been detected for large nuggets long ago in most instances, the fine piles were left unchecked and can still contain numerous sub-gram nuggets for the keen detector operator. But that's only half of the fun, because searching the virgin ground surrounding these old workings can yield more and larger nuggets, and maybe even an undiscovered nugget patch. Some sub-gram gold recovered from the tailings:
    2 points
  22. Hi Guys, in answer to the questions: Kac, LCD instead of Led's is an option, but that would mean interfacing to a screen which would mean a micro and programming which I'm not good at, so for now I'm stuck with led's Coil mounting in the center, yep, that was how I designed my original one, but I wanted to keep the wiring short to the coil windings, but I do prefer the center mount one for the reasons you mentioned, I like the center mount for the next iteration. I'm not real clear on the dual circuit you mentioned, not to sure what you mean. I'm not sure why I didn't go with a pot for gain control, I think I didn't want the coil balance and gain to interact, but it's an option to explore. Joe, Aluminum parts would be great, but when the money comes out of your pocket....eh....time for rapid prototyping. I use a place called 3D Hubs, I had them use MJF, Multi Jet Fusion, the parts are amazingly close to actual dimensions, probably +/- 2mils, they do a great job and a excellent prices. The Cuff is an anderson labs, really good quality. The Coil wire is running down the center of the shaft. Waterproof? Nope, it will be splash proof at best. Single Freq. VLF, I would say it's kind of a hybrid VLF/CW - continuous wave, you don't have to swing the coil to get a signal. Battery cover is on the back. Batteries are 8 AA's, typical black plastic holder. Battery life right now I think will be between 15 and 20 hours. Led's are a little inset right now. Materials I'm using on this model are carbon fiber tubes for all the shafts as well as the electronics/battery housing, if it don't work, it will be the prettiest non performing metal detector made! :) GB, I hear you, get it working now and make it pretty later....but I can't help it!!! :), gotta make it pretty..it's just how i"m wired :). And thanks for the zip lock plastic soil idea, that will work well. Johnny, I will do some testing over the holiday weekend with some rusty nails, straight and bent, and I think I can find some rusty tin. I'm still not to clear on the dual audio. Thanks for the input guys, this model is pretty much set, but we improve as we go. -S
    2 points
  23. Thought diving was your business 🙂 Nice gold. Have a better new year!
    2 points
  24. I would love to hear more in depth store about the terrain you found them in. Was it forested, no forest, steep mountains or hills. We're they found on a ridge or in a wash or gulch bottom or side slope of a gulch. Discribe your surroundings and what you think or know was going on with the gold geologically without telling us the location. This is a fascinating story. Tell your story in detail, I am sure there are people here that might gain ensight from it .
    2 points
  25. Bob what you describe seems normal to me on an exceptionally hot machine with auto GB. Swinging N to S you have a natural rise even a slight rise and are going against the "grain" where black sand forms in sheets..... kind of like going over a bumpy road with a car. Running E to W some of that you dont get because you GB doesnt have to adjust as quickly. We even get this in the water with about any machine if you try and hunt those high banks. It falses because we tend to swing the coil up .... kind of what you get from the so called "golf swing" lol. Now at the waters edge..... waster is move and expanding the sand causing gaps and moving more of that black sand. likely reduced sensitivity running N to S at the waters edge could be a better path. Then do your E to W grinding.......its likely you are loosing depth anyway as the machine adjusts itself.
    2 points
  26. Nice little high banker.... However I can not share your enthusiasm about the dream mat .... Something else you might consider is a smaller pump. 2000 GPH is a bit much for a 6" sluice. Try an 1100 GPH pump with some test material and see how it handles it. You are classified to what appears to be 1/4" which is good so water flow and sluice angle is all you need to dial in. The other advantage of an 100 GPH pump is they use considerably less power than the 2000 so you won't need as big a battery... Not trying to tell you how to do it just offering some suggestions for you to consider.... Heavy pans.
    2 points
  27. Crackers, you were just one cake short of digging up a whole wedding!
    2 points
  28. Western Australia was the home of multiple gold rushes between 1885 and 1893. And the region continues to produce copious amounts of gold to this day. Gold mining is the third-largest commodity sector in the region today, after iron ore and petroleum, generating nearly A$12 billion worth of value every year. Indeed, there wasn’t much reason to live in Western Australia before the discovery of gold in the region. Before the first Western Australian Gold Rush, the primary industries in the area were wool, wheat, and meat. The discovery of gold dramatically changed the history of the region and, indeed, the entire country with tens of thousands of gold prospectors streaming into the region in search of the mother lode. But it all began, as is often the case, with a single strike of gold. This first strike in the case of Western Australia Gold Rushes was made by Charles Hall and Jack Slattery and set off what is known as the Kimberley Gold Rush. The First Western Australia Gold Rush: Kimberley Gold Rush Before the first real gold strike in the Kimberley region of Western Australia, there was some inkling that underneath the ground there lurked vast riches. Alexander Forrest made an expedition into the area in 1879. He reported similarities between the rocks there and the rocks in other regions where there was gold. This prompted Adam Johns and Phil Saunders to make a trek in search of gold in April 1882, where they were able to find trace amounts of gold in the headwaters of the Ord River. They reported their findings to the Colonial Secretary, as well as their belief that there were substantial amounts of gold ready for the taking. This was how Charles Hall found himself in Western Australia. He was in search of not just gold, but the £5,000 reward being offered by the colonial government for the first man to strike a paying gold claim in the region. It was Hall who first discovered alluvial gold (which is gold deposited by the movement of water) in the Kimberley Region, the northernmost of the nine regions of Western Australia, near a town that is now named after him. He made his finds with his partner Jack Slattery on Christmas Day in 1885, making it perhaps the best Christmas since the original. The nugget was 28 ounces or nearly a full kilogram of gold. Further deposits of alluvial gold were found in Marble Bar, Southern Cross, and Yalgoo, each of which helped the population of Western Australia to explode in a few short months. All told, 15,000 people flooded into what is known today as Old Halls Creek. However, the land was tough and unforgiving and many of the new settlers died there. Anyone wishing to pay their respects to those who blazed the first trails into the region can visit their graves in a small cemetery in what is now known as the Old Town region of Halls Creek. The Kimberley Gold Rush was a very short-lived affair. All told, it lasted three months before people realized that the land was harsh and that the gold was difficult to get out of the ground. The region was never prosperous and very few men were able to get any significant amounts of gold out of this first of the Western Australia Gold Rushes. The original claim itself failed to collect on the reward offered by the colonial government because it did not produce the 10,000 ounces of gold required. What’s more, the government levied a tax of two shillings and sixpence an ounce, which disincentivized the search for the already hard to find gold. Most prospectors did anything they could to avoid paying the tax and thus the records of how much gold was discovered are unreliable at best. Modern historians believe that 23,000 ounces of gold were extracted from the region, but very little of it was reported and thus taxed. By this time, there were a scant 2,000 men left in the region. In short, there was a lot of hard work that the people who were dreaming of a quick and easy ticket to riches weren’t prepared for. The area transitioned into a trading center dominated by cattle stations and the miners who remained behind as the region emptied. Today the region is one of the largest predominantly aboriginal communities in Australia. The Second Western Australia Gold Rush: Yilgarn Gold Rush The second of the Western Australia Gold Rushes began outside of the town of Southern Cross in 1887. The first strike was made by Harry Anstey, a metallurgist, and prospector. It was this discovery that led to the establishment of the Eastern Gold Fields that are still in operation in Western Australia today. Anstey was the consummate Englishman, having received his education at Rugby and resided in the posh Kensington area of London where he worked as a civil engineer before he set sail for Western Australia in 1887. He set up his metallurgical laboratory in Perth, a city that remains the center of gold production in the Commonwealth of Australia to this day. Soon after his arrival, he was invited by prospectors Richard Greaves and Edward Payne to join them on an expedition to Bindoon, Western Australia. It was in Yilgarn that a station owner reported his find of a golden nugget while dropping a well. Anstey commanded an expedition in the region representing himself and his partners. The party discovered a reef, which kicked off the second of the Western Australia Gold Rushes. They were backed by George Leake, who at the time was the Solicitor-General of Western Australia, but later became the Premier. Beyond the simple monetary gain of having found a large amount of gold, there were other perks for Anstey. When he returned to Perth in 1889, he was appointed the Government Assayer. He was later a member of the Western Australian Legislative Council. However, by 1898, he had hit the financial skids and sold everything he owned to move to Cardup, where he ran an orchard. In 1899, he returned to England. News of the strike spread throughout the surrounding area and by late 1887, the Yilgarn Gold Rush had begun in earnest. This only intensified with the discovery of gold in the Golden Valley (named for Golden Wattle growing there, not for the gold in the area), with other strikes coming soon after. The second of the Western Australia Gold Rushes wound down in September 1892 with the discovery of gold in Coolgardie. However, it was the Yilgarn Gold Rush that is credited with exploding the population of Western Australia from 49,782 in 1891 to 184,124 by 1901. The Third Western Australia Gold Rush: The Coolgardie Gold Rush At the time gold was discovered in the Coolgardie region of Western Australia, the area was known as Fly Flat. Arthur Wesley Bayley and William Ford changed all of that when they found 554 ounces (15.7 kilograms) of gold in a single afternoon using nothing more than a Tomahawk. On September 17, 1892, they rode all this gold to Southern Cross where they attempted to claim their reward from the colonial government for their new gold strike. The new gold rush began within hours. Bayley was granted a five-acre claim that went 100 feet deep. Less than one year later, the formerly barren area had over 4,000 residents with many more outside of the newly incorporated town in the fields looking for their fortune in gold. This kicked off what is known as the greatest Gold Rush in Australian history and is often erroneously referred to as the greatest population shift in Australian history. The greatest population shift in Australian history, however, was during the gold rushes in the eastern portion of the Commonwealth. Still, this Gold Rush left a massive mark on the history of Australia. In 1891, the population of Western Australia was 46,290. By 1901, it had risen to 184,124. Today this first mine is known as the Bayley’s Reward mine and it remains one of the most profitable mines in the state of Western Australia. The Final Western Australia Gold Rush: The Kalgoorlie Gold Rush The Kalgoorlie Gold Rush was the last in the line of the Western Australia Gold Rushes. The region where gold was found here was a mere 25 miles from Coolgardie, which offered a ready supply of men and materials to toil away in the search for gold. On June 17, 1893, Paddy Hannan found alluvial gold near Mount Charlotte. The area he discovered gold in is now called the Golden Mile, continuing to provide a lucrative stream of gold for Western Australia. It is a massive open mine known today as the Super Pit. As his nickname might imply, Paddy Hannan was from Ireland — Sixmilebridge, County Clare, to be exact. His partners likewise hailed from the Emerald Isle, with Thomas Flanagan coming from Ennis, County Clare, and Daniel Shea getting his start in County Cork. Most of Hannan’s family had emigrated to Australia in 1852 and they maintained the same close family ties they had in the mother country on the new and forbidding lands in Australia. Hannan arrived in Melbourne on December 23, 1862. His occupation on the ship’s manifest was listed as “laborer.” There are several versions of the story of Hannan’s first gold strike. One holds that on the night of June 14, 1893, Hannan struck gold in a gully. However, he didn’t want to kick off a gold rush, so he concealed the claim. They concocted a tale of a missing horse and spent the next night digging for gold and marking off the area of their claim. Another version says that he concealed the find in brushwood to keep anyone from seeing it. The law, however, demanded that anyone report their findings to the colonial authorities within seven days. The team registered their findings with the colonial government on June 17, 1893. Hannan alone registered the claim, with some speculating that this was because he was the only literate member of the team however, this was not true as Flanagan had filled out a death certificate for his brother a few years prior. One theory as to why Hannan was the one to register the claim is because the others were simply better at digging for gold than he was. Flanagan and Shea were able to uncover an additional 100 ounces while Hannan was away filling out the proper paperwork. Another suggested reason is that he was younger and in better shape, though the real answer is probably because he was recognized as the leader of the trio. Within three days 400 men were prospecting for gold in the area. Within a week, 1,000. Hannan and company received a six-acre mining lease on one of the richest gold veins in the world. At age 64, in 1904, Hannan was awarded a £150 pension by the Government of Western Australia. He did not cease his prospecting efforts until he was 70 years old. He died near Melbourne under the care of two of his nieces and was interred in the Catholic section of Melbourne Central Cemetery. He is regarded as the father of Kalgoorlie. A statue was erected to him there in 1929. The Legacy of the Western Australia Gold Rushes Not so long in the young nation’s past, these four gold rushes have left a massive impact on the makeup of the country. Indeed, Perth is still a center of vast wealth to this day due to the gold rushes that took place not far from there. It ushered in what was effectively the Wild West period of Australian history, as well as the removal of the aboriginal inhabitants of the region. In some ways, it is very much like the gold rushes that built both the mainland United States, Canada, and Alaska. It also bears a great resemblance to the gold rushes currently underway in Africa. The Western Australia Gold Rushes originally appeared on kellycodetectors.com.
    2 points
  29. Great job SB, Looks to be a simple to operate lightweight design so far! The housing looks sturdy! Is it machined aluminum parts; other than coil and lower shaft? I hate plastic cuffs! Is the coil wire internal, or around the shaft? And is the unit going to be waterproof? Single frequency vlf? Is that the battery cap on the rear, and what kind of battery avilability and life do you estimate? If the LEDs are an issue in sunlight, as kac mentioned, they could be in a slightly inset housing to counteract this! That would also protect them from impact!👍👍
    2 points
  30. Great year. You must have access to some great sites there in Iowa to haul away all that silver.
    2 points
  31. I burn my old shed for 2 days in my barbecue😱(i chopped it into pieces with a jigsaw)👍 while gardening kept me warm in Central London it was 2c ,so far no neighbours complaints,we are a quiet family anyway ,garden looks bigger now. RR
    2 points
  32. Sheecan wood is wood hat I bring home that "shee can split".
    2 points
  33. Norm, Those will last forever. I hope you gave some DNA info or maybe some pictures of the nuggets to the recipients that they can see how much love you put into finding all the gold. I'm glad to see Steve's new work. Did you get some of the gold from his Orange Peel Patch? Mitchel
    2 points
  34. Maybe from some logging equpment? Look like some sort of guide rails.
    1 point
  35. Always a pleasure to see your posts! I look forward to seeing your new discoveries.
    1 point
  36. Bob ... all that noise we hear here in the water when we get near the hard pan can be gray mud concentrate or fine black sand and metal flakes. That’s really something to listen to.... running the machine hot if you don’t hear it tells you you may have a lot of moved fluffy sand .... good sign when you hear it..... I just adjust the sensitivity but start to really pay attention.... much like when you start finding iron.
    1 point
  37. Yep. I agree this is normal. The AQ is a nice machine to operate. I didn’t think there was much of an issue with black sand especially on the Florida west coast.
    1 point
  38. ...and almost 2 months later no deliveries have yet been documented or announced. Scratching my head to see such anticipation for what is likely going to be a mediocre deisgn from a performance standpoint. Form over substance. I wonder what the makeup of the people waiting in line for this is? Serious detector geeks have to know there is nothing special here from a performance standpoint and it is hard to believe casual detectorists or newbies would latch onto a crowdsourced startup vs. going to their local walmart for an impulse buy on a bounty hunter for 1/3 the cost. I just don't get it. That leaves those with a combination of a curiosity factor and 200 bucks buring a hole in their pockets. (That sounds right up my alley )
    1 point
  39. Pretty cool so far. Couple thoughts though. LED display might be difficult to read in the sunlight, maybe a backlight LCD? Also on the coil where it mounts you might be better having the ears towards the center. Has less nosing down and better balance when swinging. Add a lateral rib on either side where the ears are to help absorb the shock so it isn't knock sensitive. I been curious why someone hasn't done a double circuit using the same coil that run the same time so you could run an all metal mode and have a discriminator circuit to allow for iron audio overlay. The Excal layout of controls is pretty nice. I like how you put a guard around the controls.
    1 point
  40. After the Reale what was your next best find and so on ...
    1 point
  41. Decided to go more for silver today at a possible older site that now is a grass parking lot for a school. I had really high hopes of the Equinox pulling silver from the ground as there wasn't much trash so I lowered recovery to 4 and increased sensitivity to 24. There was plenty of depth, so I even busted out my t-handle shovel. I got a very strong 32-36, and decided to dig it even though the coil was still able to pick it up about 10 inches off the ground. I was expecting a can given the footprint of the sound as the coil waved over the object. Down about 6 inches was what I thought might be a money holder or a makeup compact. I waited to open it until I got home. Sadly, there were no gold or silver coins inside. It is still kind of cool. From the looks of the design, it appears to be from the 40s-50s. The makeup still smells similar to how it should smell. There are no words that I can find on the outside or inside. It is not magnetic, so I assume it is brass. Anyone with an idea of a brand name would be appreciated. The silver dime was unexpected. Given that I don't find a ton of silver coins, each shiny coin coming from deep in the ground is also thrilling! Although I have detected the area a time or two in the past, I have not found anything good there. Plans are being made to go back.😁 The weather in FL was warm today. I know other parts of the U.S. have frozen ground, so I thought lots of pics of fairly mundane items might be appreciated.
    1 point
  42. Norm, so glad it was Steve...that’s who I was planning on contacting when I get back west from Florida! He put a bale on a nice 7g nugget I found in Gold Basin a few years back...love his work and he’s a good guy! p.s. that’s an awesome speci pendant!
    1 point
  43. Peg Steve Wandt, his business name is Natural Gold Jewelry 530 320 3096 He is very good to work with. He also made this pendant out of a specimen that I found several years ago. The quality of his work speaks for its self. Norm
    1 point
  44. Yah I know what you mean about getting old Jim. I do still chop a fair amount of wood but I got a splitting buddy a few years back. It’s still quite a bit of work feeding it, but it is a big help. Oneguy, a lot of danger falling any timber and the redwood is a big, brittle tree that can literally explode on impact. I haven’t fallen many redwoods (especially big ones) but have cut quite a few up to remove from the highways. Tremendous pressure on a big fallen redwood in uneven ground. You start sawing and they really talk to you. I built the tree fort in the back yard some years ago for my boys. The fort is about 10’x10’ so you can see how big the base of this old growth tree is it sits on. The old fellers went up the trunk as ways to get away from the huge base. Mike
    1 point
  45. I have notice some directional falsing but that was more in the water. I was working exclusively wet sand (sand bars) and was getting in all directions. What I have learned is as the battery weakens I need to readjust some settings (not like the Nox which I can run very hot and quiet). I had also reviewed Alexandre 4 bullet points but I decided to increase the sensitivity and lower the threshold to get to the deeper targets in this one area where I found the rings. I hit a few very deep nickels and at that point I switched things up to squeak a little more depth and swing slower. And then bam, gold!
    1 point
  46. The big battery system in the Pro gave it lots of raw depth ....Deepest Detector on a saltwater Beach I ever used .......nothing like The SL or Even The Latest TDI Beach Hunter ......I’m taking straight PI mode no ground Balance
    1 point
  47. I’d be more worried about some of the mobile phone apps that you download for mapping, no one seems to have a problem walking around with one of these tracking/logging/listening devices in their pockets. 😁
    1 point
  48. The nice thing about belief is it is impervious to facts. No matter how many times it is explained that there is no transmitter sending magic signals to Minelab, people still think its true. Something that would be so easy to verify with a scope has somehow remained deeply hidden. Even the FCC testing missed it. But you know Minelab, they are so advanced they probably figured out a way to transmit a signal that lies completely outside the known electromagnetic spectrum. Probably something they stole from LRL. The fun part is that if Minelab were this evil, then the system would be transmitting secrets even when you think you have deactivated it. That's even better. People think they are safe when they have turned the system off, but it stays on at all times. The coil can also read credit card chip info if you have any nearby, so they transmit that also. There, some new conspiracy stuff to chew on! Be afraid, be very afraid!!
    1 point
  49. I wish the Equinox were magic on flat steel but it’s not - just witness the bottle cap complaints. Flat steel will generally ring up in the “teens” but the larger the piece is, the higher it can read. Forget all this more depth stuff. What I want is a detector that can simply and accurately tell ferrous from non-ferrous. Leave off virtually all controls and adjustments, just low tone ferrous and higher tone anything else. You would think that getting clean ferrous versus non-ferrous discrimination would be as basic as it gets, but anyone that hunts low conductors in iron knows how complex the problem is. And just because a machine does not false on ferrous does not mean all is well. It can’t be rejecting all ferrous if it comes at the cost of a lot of missed non-ferrous, but that is precisely what the machines that reject nearly all ferrous at all times are doing. It is a real quandary because I do want a machine that does a good job rejecting ferrous, but at the same time I would have a hard time trusting a detector that is extremely aggressive at rejecting ferrous. A Sovereign or Excalibur will reject most ferrous, but those machines also tend to get very blind in dense ferrous. People tend to want to deny that i.e. “I dig non-ferrous out of nail pits with MY Sovereign!” but it is just a fact of BBS and FBS to a lesser degree. I am convinced Equinox manages to pull some great targets simply because it does have you digging more ferrous also. Making Equinox kill ferrous just might also remove the magic - in fact I am betting on it. That’s why I generally leave Iron Bias at zero. But I still hate that flat steel! Fisher F75 Ferrous Tone Quirk New version software is working fine for me.
    1 point
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