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Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/16/2022 in Posts

  1. General Summary: I set out with two goals in mind, but only accomplished one. I wanted to compare the 6000 response on small nuggets to the 12" X Coil, but this was completely pointless due to the 30mph winds making audio on my cell phone completely inaudible. Also, I wanted to try out the 15" CC X Coil I was sent last year but simply have not had a chance to try out due to a number of factors in life. X Coils sent this coil to me for free to try out right as my detecting season had ended last year. I worked over about a 20x50ft section of a patch completely with the 6000 until there were no audible targets left. I use Auto+ in normal. Then, as is my general technique, I set the GPZ such that I was running the maximum gain with the most stable threshold I could acquire. In this case, 18 gain, 12 threshold, low smoothing, normal. My feeling is that these settings average out to something fairly close to what the 6000 is doing in Auto+, if any equivalency can be drawn, ignoring GeoSense. Almost every target was 6+ inches deep with the CC. Whereas most of my 6000 targets were about 1-7" deep. Nothing too surprising here. Initially from this section I got about 40 nuggets with the 6000, and got another 7 more with the CC. The avg size of the 6000 nuggets was around 0.1 grams, and the average size of the deeper CC nuggets was around 0.25 grams. There is both salt and medium mineralization in this ground, and the CC suffered as would any larger coil in the salt. I'm quite sure I left some nuggets in the ground because I got tired of chasing salt signals. The 6000 w/11" pretty much only gave a signal on targets or the buried clay balls and so it was much easier to dig only just good targets. But it definitely missed stuff once it got deeper than 5-6" or so. Here you can see a pretty typical ~7" hole that the CC was finding gold in. This gold looks bigger but it only weighs 0.21 grams. I think the deepest one I dug was around 9". The gold here doesn't often get bigger than 3/4 gram, so physics limits the depth at which this stuff can be found, thus the lack of deeper results. My gold vs trash take. Almost everything was 6"+ deep, including trash. The 6000 got almost everything closer to surface aside from the one smallest pellet. I say almost everything 6" deep because the longer nugget was only like 2" deep and there is no way the 6000 missed that thing. Again, I swear the 6000 is occasionally "hiccuping" and missing some quite obvious targets. I don't know if it's due to electronics bogging down/glitching, or just needing to hit some nuggets exactly the right way and in the right direction. But that one was almost an overload signal on the Z. But maybe I just didn't overlap swings enough...no clue. The gold vs trash ratio is pretty similar to what I got closer to the surface with the 6000. A lot of this surface soil is deflationary, meaning gold is often found right in the grass roots up top, depending how heavy the wind is and how much ground cover there is. My Opinions: Having used the 17" CC earlier in Arizona, I already knew these coils were killer. Seriously, they are like having a GPZ 7500 before anyone else, and I'm not just saying that because I got the coil for free. They are that much deeper. Anyone who has an X Coil adapter already, and who hunts in ground where deeper nuggets have been proven to lurk - this coil will almost certainly find you more gold (as long as the gold is actually there). That said, like any larger coil, they suffer in salt. So this test wasn't quite an apples to apples comparison. And actually, I didn't even fully realize there was salt in the ground here when I was running just the 6000, otherwise I'd have chosen a different spot. But the salt signal was definitely there and obvious when swinging across soil interfaces. Also, I recall reading that these CC's are way better in mineralization than the spirals, which may be the case (I haven't tested), but the 6000 had far less overall response to the iron mineralization than the GPZ+CC, even though larger coils are better with ferrite type mineralization, generally speaking. This is more a function of the GPZ than the coil though, I believe, in this case since the 17" I ran in Arizona didn't suffer any more than the stock GPZ coil in medium mineralization. In summary, I'll end with something I've said before: these CC's (and the 8" in salt) are the only reason I'm still hanging on to my GPZ still. I'd have sold it long ago if these coils didn't exist. They are seriously like having a new GPZ that no one else has access too. That said, nothing - and I mean nothing - can compete with the ease of use of the 6000, and it's quickness and speed. It's built to be a prospecting machine, not a patch cleaner. Yes. It misses stuff. Absolutely, without doubt. And if a person is primarily spending time cleaning up the last remaining crumbs in long dead patches then the 6000 is not a great choice and nothing can compete with the depth and sensitivity of the 7000+ X Coils. But for general prospecting and exploration, nothing on the market can compete with the 6000 either. Two separate machines, two separate use cases. My arm was dead tired after swinging the GPZ again, I only made it 6 hours and normally I like to spend 10 hours if I'm making a trip to the field. And I just have to swing far, far slower with the GPZ both due to the increased ground response and the outright weight of the coil/machine. And in the end, I actually found more nuggets by number and weight with the 6000 just by accepting that I would lose some gold left behind and being ok with trading that for raw speed and ground coverage. I wasn't sure how much gold I left, but I knew I left some. It paid for my gas and back, so not insignificant. And if one of those deeper nuggets was a lunker, well then it might pay for an entire season of gas, never know. But my personal detecting philosophy is to sweep up 80% of the easy stuff quickly and move on to find more places. It just pays better over time. Then come back with the GPZ + X Coils to clean up patches when times are lean and exploration isn't paying off, or when my arm and elbow feel up to the task. This is the reason I'm using the 6000 so much now. And it's also the reason I'm still keeping the GPZ. But of course we all use detectors for different things, and this is just me showing how each works well in their own specific use cases which might not apply to anyone else.
    25 points
  2. Erin and I went exploring today. We had never been to Elk City before. A lot of mining in the area. Gold was first discovered there in 1861. I haven't researched the area other than a few maps. Thought I would share a few pictures. The Gold Point Mill and mess hall are still standing. In decent shape from being built in the 30's. Jaw crusher, hammer mill, ball mill and shaker tables are there.
    20 points
  3. Did a woods hunt, probably last till fall as stuff is growing in fast and snagged an old Chinese coin, guessing 1800's. Put in another hour or so at a school yard and found a lot of nickels others skipped over and a pretty nice 925 silver ring. Machine still runs good, forgot how easy it was to use.
    19 points
  4. I was eager to hit the spot after a long work week. Saturday morning early I showed up only to find three trucks with trailers and about 8 people rounding up all the cattle to move them out. There is no feed left and the previous times I was there the cattle just ignored my truck which was a good indication that they were not being fed. Even so they all looked to be in great shape. For cattle ranchers now is a tough time due to drought as feed prices are extremely high they have to decided what to sell and what to keep and move to other areas. At any rate I decided to abort the mission as they were parked right on top of where I was finding everything lol. I decided to be responsible and go back home and do some yard work 🙂 Sunday morning I was right back again to give it another good sweeping. I left the Deus 2 in the truck. I wanted to see what the other detectors could find. The Equinox with the elliptical coil got a couple things but my old trusty CTX 3030 still impresses me after all these years... It's so good on deep high conductors...even in nails if you just move slowly along...I was using one of my favorite programs for relic hunting "Gone Huntings Combined mode" ...the watch fob was the find of the morning for me...the CTX called it a 13.45 with the target trace giving me a nice solid red dot on the screen the kind of signal you dream of in a good relic spot. I was hoping for a seated quarter but was not disappointed when the fob popped out...it was at least 8 inches deep. Also got my 3rd shoe insert at this spot...this guy must have had some serious foot problems....By noon it was getting hot so off I went back home to cool off. More yard work and my avocado trees have lots of baby avocados. We had more lady bugs this year the I have ever seen. strick
    19 points
  5. Last weekend I had an opportunity to go on a club outing to an old mining ghost town site on private land. We had a hunt last spring at a different ghost town, which was my first, and this would be my second. I took the Deus II to test out and the Equinox, which performed well at my first ghost town hunt, as a backup. I had high hopes of doing a little better in the iron and nail infested ground since the Deus detectors are supposed to excel in iron. I used the Relic program mainly and did some checking with the Park and General programs and ran with Notch at 00-00, IAR at 2, Reactivity at 1-2, Iron Volume at 3, and Sensitivity at 96. I was prepared for the audio onslaught of the rapid fire iron and falsing tones, but was amazed at the stability of the Deus. The ground was bone dry from the long drought and iron tones were plentiful but managable and non ferrous tones rang out loud and clear. At about an hour into the hunt, I was learning to recognize the iron falses and nail tones from good tones. And then I hit a very recognizable penny tone and VID at 86. There were a lot of iron sounds mixed in as well but the 86 kept popping through. I imagined it was a large nail or big iron false but since I was investigating all targets, I had to dig it. When I opended the hole, I found a handful of nails, a piece of thin iron strapping and laying among the clutter was an unmistakable penny shape. My first thought was how did a Zincoln get down that deep? When I pulled it out, I was looking at a 1911 Wheat penny! I couldn't believe it. That was the oldest coin I have found in my 2 years of detecting in Colorado so I was pretty excited. The next day we were out at the site for a few more hours. I had been all over the place the day before like a dog looking for a bone, but decided to go back and work the area where I found the wheat penny and then it happened. I was almost hypnotized by the constant low hum of iron when an unfamiliar but solid 50 popped through. I thought it might be another button or piece of jewelry or something and then I saw something amazing in the hole! Another first for me! I know these things may seem trivial to you more experienced detectorists, but but this is like the Holy Grail to me. I never expected to be able to find something like this and now I feel like I actually can. More than that, I feel a little more like I'm one of you. I must say I am even more happy with the D2 as I learn it more and I believe it's good reputation in iron is well deserved.
    18 points
  6. Beautiful "spring" day today! It got up to 83 but there was a strong breeze blowing all day and it was dry, so it wasn't too bad. First field I went to was the small house, I used the Equinox there and got nothing but a bucketful of aluminum and one small brass plug. Still haven't found what I'm looking for there. 🤬 Went back across the highway, took a break and then went into the big field, the corn is already pretty high, it grew a lot the last couple days. Took out the Deus 2 and headed into the field, not 100' from where I parked I dug a fat IHP, but can't get a date off it. 😵 My only coin today. 🙄 Hacked around where I had been, really didn't find anything, so I went along the old road to the old site where a building was, I figured at least I'd get a few relics, and it worked out ok. 🙂 Dug a Skeleton key end, below it a plate for one. Left is a stocking snap with something stamped in it but I can't read it. A large brass ring, a small piece of stamped broken jewelry that looks like a wing: A bent copper screw, two pieces of unidentifiable brass that may be flatware or tools. I got the most interesting tiny button I've ever found, you can see how small it is next to the small ring which may be a spark plug ring . that's a lot of detail for a small brass button. Dug a broken Tombac and one of my most interesting finds, what may be a derringer butt plate. It was broken but I found both pieces about a foot apart. The other was this ancient faucet: It has a hook for hanging a bucket. Heavy brass. Quite an assortment of stuff, I probably won't go back to this farm until fall after they harvest the corn.
    18 points
  7. The corn isn't getting any lower at my new permission, invited Chase down for a hunt. He has a long drive to get here so I got there about 2 hours before him. Today I brought both the Equinox and the Deus, but the Deus stayed in the truck. Crossing the field I dug a button that matches one Chase dug in another spot far away, and a newer memorial. I went behind the house (which was the front in the 40s and earlier) and started searching where I left off a couple days ago. It rained since then, almost 2". Today was going to be muggy and hot, and it sure didn't disappoint. This is where the old road goes the other way from my last post. That's Chase way out there. I thought he would be able to find some stuff if he went up the road, I hadn't searched there and was just going back and forth behind the house. My bad, there wasn't much out there. Meantime I dug a few more coins, the trash was plentiful. All the usual suspects, you pretty much should dig any good signal in this farm if you want the wide variety of possibilities. Having found large cents here, and the age of the farm (Victorian era) there should be some silver coins here! Among the trash was this curious locking buckle: It locks. Also dug what I think may be an old can opener that was broken off something: I later pointed Chase to a large iron patch I found, he had his Deus 2. I was getting a headache from all the iron (I always run in all metal), so I went back to to where I was digging the coins. Here are the finds, we also searched a spot where a house was but it's now long gone. Big brass D buckle, an adjusting wheel of some sort, a waffle stamped piece of copper (no idea🤔), a fancy nickel plated rein guide, a really nice wave pattern button like one Chase dug previously, it says "TREBLE LONDON" on the back: a small brass legging button with thread still in it, a small aluminum button. Coins are an 1888 and 1889 IHP, 1940 something wheat, 1976 memorial and a 1997 dime. My favorite find of the day was this 1903 Barber Quarter! It's a little beat up but looks ok otherwise. I finally got one. 😀 All I need to find now is an SLQ. Maybe I'll find one here, this place has never been hunted. Chase did pretty good too, especially in the iron patch. it's always fun to have someone along on these hunts, I tend to annoy myself after a while🤪
    18 points
  8. Head for the beach. We had some high winds last week and I got to thinking that I should do something different. The boss said it was ok to take off work early on Friday so instead of a pick I loaded the beach scoop into the back of the truck...when I got to the spot it looked like there had been 6 feet of sand removed from the area. Nice steep slope...targets everywhere and I had it all to myself. It was a good hunt. 4 silver rings, one junk tungsten, and the find of the day was the 18 k engagement A JAFFE ring...Its a real beauty in person...but mother grundy has a way of playing cruel tricks on us sometimes...the center stone does not test positive.. Who in the bleep buys a beautiful 18k engagement ring covered in real diamonds and then puts a fake in the middle? I even brought it to the jeweler today just to make sure...his reply "No Luck" lol. So that the way it goes... but I'll take it anyways...it's way too big to fit the wife but she has already laid claim to the silver ring with the red colored stone. Equinox 800/ field 2/coiltek 10x5 Happy hunting... strick
    17 points
  9. In the past 7-8 weeks I've owned the Deus 2, I've been out with it a lot. That's about to end as California is in a drought. Summer is nearly here, and the ground is now already quite dry and becoming hard to dig in, so I won't be out much until the rains return. I've primarily used it to search for coins and jewelry in parks and fields, but also looked for gold nuggets here in California for 7-8 hours (and unfortunately didn't find any). I started with the January V0.6 version and switched to the V0.7 in late April. I updated to V0.71 as soon as it was out to correct the only issue I've ever had which was with the pinpoint mode in V0.7. Overall, I've been very happy with the machine and its performance. I've especially enjoyed the light weight and super ergonomics and have never felt tired from swinging this unit. Its been a pleasure to use since the beginning and I really enjoy the various audio options. The sounds of the pitch tones and full tones just sound so good to my ears! Coming from the Equinox 800, I didn't find the transition to another mulitfrequency machine difficult, it was just a matter of learning the new menu system on the XP. I mostly used the stock programs and over time learned to tweak settings a bit to work best in my conditions. I think somebody new to the Deus platform would be able to use stock programs to start and get great performance right away and then gradually learn what the various settings do to further optimize. One of the most unique and useful features of the Deus 2 for me has been is its mineralization level graph. I've known all along I hunt in very difficult soil conditions, but the Deus 2 confirmed this with hard data. Where I hunt, the mineralization graph is generally 3/4 to full bars, so high to severely mineralized. I've used this information to help me set my reactivity level in the different programs I've used. The higher the mineralization, the higher I set the reactivity level. The factory preset levels of 2.5 to 3 generally work ok in 3/4 bar soil, and I had to use reactivity 4 in one site with full bars while looking for coins. I generally get a max of 4-5 inches of solid ID numbers on a coin in my soil and less as the mineralization bar increases to near full. Signal clarity and strength start to really get lost past 2 inches. One helpful setting has been audio response. I have had good success raising this up to a "6" to hear faint deeper or smaller targets better and was glad to see signals didn't seem to become more distorted like I at first feared. This is something for those of you in difficult soil to consider trying, despite the drawback of losing potential audio information about how deep and weak a coin signal might be. This setting for me has been a "mini game-changer" as it allows me to hear things I'd otherwise miss. I've been happy with the 9 inch coil on the Deus 2. I think its a great all-around coil size. Nice depth, but still small enough to limit targets under the coil at one time. I hunt in thick trash often and the size works well for pinpointing targets without the need to engage pinpoint mode very often. This is one of the top pluses of the Deus 2 for me. I know where targets are located with a simple "X" sweep and this saves lots of time. This is a big deal when the goal is to retrieve more targets in the time spent hunting. The machine itself also separates and IDs items very well. I can often tell where 2 targets are when right next to each other by carefully swinging around and mentally taking note of each target location based on the sounds or ID#. The separation abilities of the Deus 2 are quite good and from what I see, XP deserves the reputation it has for making machines that excel in trash or iron-infested sites. Non-ferrous signals really stand out on this machine. This saves a lot of time locating things precisely and also helps find desirable targets from among the trash. Like all machines though, you still have to put in your time digging junk to get the good stuff! I probably won't use this machine for nugget hunting in the future since I have a Minelab GPX6000 which is much better suited for the job. It cuts through severely mineralized soil far better, but I do intend to keep using the Deus 2 as my primary coin and jewelry hunting machine. I hope to someday take it to the beach and do some diamond ring and other jewelry hunting, though I do live quite far from any beaches with a lot of activity. While I don't often search specifically for relics, I also hope to use the Deus 2 in the future at some old ghost towns or mining locations and am confident its a great machine for a place like that. If I were to only have 1 metal detector(a crazy idea, I know!) , I think the Deus 2 would be in the running for my only choice. It can do a lot very, very well such as hunt for jewelry and coins in parks, be used at the beach or when diving, and even if somebody wanted to take it nugget hunting. It can do all of those things quite well, even though other machines may be better in certain areas or situations. But, since I primarily detect natural gold nuggets, in this case I'd pick a Minelab GPX pulse-induction model. If I could also have a vlf companion, I'd get the Deus 2. I know newer and possibly better models to compete with the Deus 2 will be out in the next year or two, but I'd still be happy with the Deus 2 once they are out, since I think it will be very tough to beat the light weight and ergonomics of it, and it should stay very competitive in separating and ID abilities for quite a few years to come.
    17 points
  10. I tested some of the more common targets we might find at the beach and on land just as a "ballpark" reference in my on-going effort to transition from Minelab to XP. These results are from my custom Beach program that I use most often on our beaches. Be advised, the target TID's listed were derived from air tests. TIDs from targets found in sand or soil can be expected to vary somewhat. Your results conducted under similar conditions may also vary to some degree. Recognizing that metallurgical composition of the many targets we find varies considerably, I'm still in the process of trying to determine an acceptable cut off tone break between low and mid level conductors on the Deus II scale....admittedly, a search that may be in vain. 😆 Deus II Test Data.xls
    16 points
  11. Largo is still around with us but can't get around much. I spoke with him a couple weeks ago. He's had some health issues and things not going well, but I guess it's part of life. PM me and I'll get you contact info. He's one of the nicest guys you'll run across in the find. Showed me around Rye Patch, NV back in the mid 90's. Top notch guy.
    16 points
  12. Hunting’s been slow lately. I don’t mean not being able to get out and detect, but just that the finds have been slow and insignificant. To spice it up a bit I took my daughters to a band concert at the high school on Thursday. While they were watching the concert I detected an area of the school grounds that I hadn’t detected before. (A little background on this school: It was built in 1960 and on a previous hunt I got two silver dimes. However on previous hunts it was the amount of clad that made it fun. On one hunt last year I got $30.03 and on another $18.15 plus the ‘59 and ‘64 rosies mentioned above.) I got on some clad right away and ended up with $7.97 in a little less than two hours. Today I went back to the same school and hit the same area as I did Thursday plus other grassy areas. Today’s total was $14.63 in clad plus a surprise! About halfway through the hunt I dug up what I thought was a dime but on closer examination it was a 1943 Swedish 25 ore coin which is 40% silver. I’m not a big clad hunter like some guys, but when things are slow it sure puts the fun factor back in detecting!
    12 points
  13. NickW I got my first bit of gold (in a pan as a kid with Dad) over 60+ years ago, and have been detecting gold for 40+ years. I have included some gold photos of gold that I have found with old technology VLF and ML_3000 detectors with coils less than 11" wide. These nuggets are the most common size found even on remote virgin patches that I have found. Some of my bigger finds were specimens, I can remember more than 60 ounces of gold from less than ten of them them. As there is a good range of smaller gold in the following photos I would say you would be best to go for the GPX_6000 however if you get hooked on doing flogged deep ground or large deep nuggets I would then buy a second/backup detector with your finds and that would be the GPZ_7000 update when it comes out. The main thing is how you use the detector and the size of the gold you are chasseing.👍 It my birthday tomorrow and since that makes me nearly double your age my views are for an old timer so GPZ_7000 weight might be more acceptable for a young buck such as yourself.😁
    11 points
  14. Another 1.1gm today, so 8.3gm all told for 8 days ownership. All within 5 minutes of home. 31.7 grams to go.....
    11 points
  15. This grassy area has given up many Barber dimes and now add another to the collection.😀1908s Barber Dime. 6 inches deep, ID 85-86, park program on the Deus2. Glad it wasn’t a pesky Rosie I’ve only dug up 2 of them at this area and only silver coin from the 40s was a Mercury Dime. Ground was soft a month ago now it’s hard diggin and temperature today was around 93 degrees I quit after 2 and a half hours. Gonna have to get out a little earlier. Bottom pic is where some of the silver coins may have come from. Denny
    11 points
  16. Cool pics! If you haven't been up the Yankee Fork yet and seen the dredge it's worth the trip, I didn't take the tour but should have....
    11 points
  17. If you hunt areas a lot that have tight locations where an 11" mono refuses to fit, you already know the answer. It is not about whether the smaller coil detects small gold better, as much as it is about it fitting where larger coils will not go. I think the 11" round is an amazing coil, detects gold as small as you could wish for, and also has good depth on larger stuff. A very good balance of performance aspects. A smaller coil will hit tiny bits a little better (not much) while also giving up some depth on larger bits. Not a trade I'd really advise for most people, if space constraints are not an issue. For me, getting between rocks, tightly spaced sagebrush, manzanita, wide deep crevices, etc. is the sole reason for wanting a smaller coil. I've found some very nice nuggets in nooks and crannies. Any small gold boost is simply a bonus for me. Put another way, if space allows, the 11" coil stays on my 6K. A small DD could be very nice, as the 14" round is too heavy for my taste. I'd be just fine with an 11" round DD. A standard Minelab coil, surprised they did not make one.
    10 points
  18. With all this hot weather, I decided it was time for my first water hunt of the year. It turned into a very productive hunt I was using the Legeñd with my Blu3 Nemo setup hunting in chest deep water. The first hour and a half was the usual, bottle caps, pull tab and a little bit of clad. All three rings came within 15 minutes. . First one was the big silver 925 with a fake stone. A few feet away, I dug another ring, 10k. I swung back over the spot and got a real funky signal. The target was a broken 10k ring. I could not tell you what the signals were in the water because my control pod was underwater. The silver ring rang 46 and the two 10k rings hit at 15-16 on the Legend out of the water. I hunted for another 30 minutes and didn't come up with anything but a couple of pieces of trash. Running 20Khz due to bad EMI, 2 tones , tone break at 9, sens 24, all metal. Bottle caps were giving a low/high tone, I could tell it was a junk signal, but I dug it anyways just to be sure.
    10 points
  19. I decided to expand the test I posted on another thread in this forum. The question was raised concerning the TID differences among the various programs. For this test, I used a silver walking liberty half dollar and a modern Kennedy half dollar separately scanned by each of the Deus 2's 12 factory programs. I conducted a frequency scan prior to each program and EMI didn't seem to be a factor. My purpose was to determine just how much of a TID variance there was among these programs on the same targets. Program Max Frequency Silver Half Modern Half 1. General: 40kHz 98 97 2. Sensitive 40kHz 98 97 3. Sens FT 40kHz 98 97 4. Fast 40kHz 98 97 5. Park 24kHz 99 98 6. Deep HC 14kHz 99 99 7. Mono 16.5kHz 97 96 8. GoldField 40kHz 98 97 9. Relic 24kHz 99 98 10. Diving 14kHz 99 99 11. Beach 24kHz 99 99 12. Beach Sens 40kHz 99 98 Note: Although the results show a fairly consistent relationship between the TIDs throughout the 12 programs, the silver half TID was solid and pretty much unwavering. The modern half however had a tendency to vary by a point or even up to 3 points as it settled in on the most common of the TID numbers reported here. Again, these 12 were all stock factory programs; no adjustments were made to any of the internal settings. I would hazard a guess that results from the adjusted settings within a custom program might generate somewhat different TID results.
    9 points
  20. I agree. Removing dirt from the equation negates tests as far as I’m concerned. It’s like racing cars by jacking them up with tires off the ground, and comparing speedometer readings. Seems like some people never metal detect, just test, and test, and test. It's an actual subset of the hobby now, just like coin detecting or relic detecting. But hey, as long as they are having fun, that's all that matters. Me, I'd rather go find stuff.
    9 points
  21. If the area you are in has even mild to moderate EMI, you will need the 14" DD coil for the GPX 6000. If you have to resort to using the 14" DD you may still need a harness/hipstick especially in rocky, uneven, mountainous terrain. If you don't have EMI issues and can use the 11" mono with no harness, the GPX 6000 is easy to use, easy to swing and super easy to master. I have no experience with the GPZ 7000 other than swinging one for an hour a couple of years ago and deciding to move on/wait for something lighter. I am a longtime GPX 5000/4800 owner. The GPX 6000 with the 11" coil is extremely sensitive compared to the 5000. Currently, I still think the 5000 is deeper on larger gold simply because it can be used with much bigger coils.
    9 points
  22. Confidence in your detector is paramount. When you have it, gold is the result. I love my 6000 and can't believe the depth that the small 11" coil gives me. Fly poop detector??? Haaa!
    9 points
  23. Over a gram and it's a nugget? Spare me! A nugget is over twenty ounces. Anything less is a bit, lump, or in my case, a colour. Next thing a speck will be called a nugget. Get real.
    9 points
  24. So I had the chance to get out myself and test the new GOLDHAWK coils... Super impressed. The 10x5" size is a superb little coil - 🙂 The 9" round is a great well balance coil - I like this one The 14x9" is a great searcher with some excellent performance characteristics... More news coming out this week!! Excited to get these out there! Stay well peeps. Trev
    9 points
  25. That was my point I've used the 6k enough to know what it would be like with a larger coil. Minelab are obviously just protecting the sale's of their top priced model. The detector handles the 17 elliptical just fine, but elliptical coils geometry limits their depth capacity even though they have a very similar surface area and susceptibility to EMI. So I call B.S. in regards to the arguments of electronics not being suitable and noise limiting their performance. Its simple physics, round coils are quieter than elliptical and larger diameter coils go deeper. Elliptical coils are limited by the width of the narrowest part of the coil and also suffer from the uneven signal rx of their shape which also negatively affects edge of detection target depth considerably. The 17in minelab coil is clearly designed for smaller gold and not depth as all elliptical coils should be due to the above. I've never been a fan of elliptical coils due to years of seeing the comparative results. If I was able to get a 14in and 18in or 20in round coils for the 6k it would render my 7k obsolete, and I'm just talking monos here a well designed concentric would be a complete game changer in my opinion. Hence my frustration at the current situation, and I can't swallow the invalid excuses put forward as to why... Any way that's my final take on the situation. I suppose it leads me back to using Xcoils again.
    8 points
  26. Also: my transmission went out in my warrantied Ford. Ford said "parts shortage" prevented them from supplying customers with replacement transmissions, which is total BS because they have thousands of F150's and F250's stacked in the Kentucky Motor Speedway parking lot with transmissions in them and they are still selling new trucks. They were saying it might be 4 months to 1 year to get my truck fixed and that my only solution was to buy a brand new truck, which I had literally just done. Totally unacceptable. You'll note I have my F150 back. The day I decided to contact my attorney and forward Ford copies of relevant federal warranty laws and how they were in voilation, all of a suddent the "parts shortage" ended and I got one sent to me. Companies are starting to use this crap as excuses for their own mismanagement and to do less for their customers IMO. Anyways, just letting people know who might find themselves in a similar situation with truck warranties in the US. We have laws protecting the agreements manufacturers made with us when we paid for what we bought and fulfilled our part of the agreement. If they offshored their entire manufacturing to make shareholders a bit more profit, we aren't the ones that have to pay for it, they are.
    8 points
  27. Yesterday JW suggested we take our GPX 6000's out and compare them to ensure mine is now working properly as I've had no confidence in it after my woes. Unfortunately we were unable to compare our 11" coils like for like as his coil is still away for warranty replacement, it must be 3 weeks now and no sign of a replacement, they just have no stock to swap it for which is pretty poor, but with the number of faulty ones I've seen on Facebook I'm not at all surprised they have no stock as it's not a coil they'd make a lot of as extras seeing everyone gets one with the detector. JW suggested we go to an area he's used his 6000 a lot with the 11" before it died so he would know how mine should behave to see if anything is out of the ordinary. I just wanted to use his detector for a bit to see if EMI was as troubling with it as it was with mine, so I took it for a spin with the Minelab 17" coil on it, I found it was no different with it's EMI behaviour to mine, in fact I thought it was worse but I guess that's to be expected, a bigger coil. We were quite close to a standard normal power line, not the high voltage transmission ones like at the other area that I wanted to wrap the GPX around a tree and say goodbye to it for good. JW had a fair while on mine checking it out and doing factory resets and just experimenting with it, he thought it ran similar to his with it's EMI behaviour so I guess it is how it is, he had my threshold running reasonable, much better than it was at the other location that's for sure. The other spot with the transmission lines is my favourite area but it just suits the GPZ better as it doesn't care at all about the transmission lines, even right near them its as if they barely exist and you can run it with the normal coil you'd use and your normal settings. The GPX requires the DD and adjusted settings so it makes no sense to use the GPX there, the same reason I didn't like using my 4500 there. Once JW had approved my GPX I felt a little more confident in it, knowing that more ratty threshold is normal, I'm just not good on ratty detectors and feel I'll always miss the faint targets with them by comparison to more stable detectors where as JW doesn't mind a more ratty detector, experience level differences I would guess. I had another confidence booster, the Avantree Torus speakers, I've never been much of a headphone person and the ML-100's that come with the GPX have a high pitched hiss all the time once connected to the 6000 which would give me a headache listening to that all day but the Torus speakers are perfect sound, no hiss and very clear audio and easy to hear even in a noisy environment, where we were has a rushing river nearby with quite noisy water sound in the background but the Torus was fine, perfect in fact. Quick and easy to pair with good sound quality and volume level, I was able to turn the GPX volume right down to minimum to stabilize the machine even more and run the Torus on the volume level that suited me. One thing I will point out is with the Torus on you'll like finding 22 shells, sure the noise is booming but the Torus gives you a shoulder massage every time you sweep over one so you'll find yourself swinging over them multiple times enjoying the vibrating massage 🙂 I like the Torus so much I'm going to use my Bluetooth transmitter on the GPZ and use them on it too, so I can finally retire my harness that was only there as a way to hold my SP01 and speakers. The neck gap on them is huge, designed for someone with a neck like Shrek I think and my Pelican neck is a bit skinny for them but they held on perfectly fine and I had no concerns of them coming off. I'd highly recommend anyone considering these things to give them a try, I doubt you'll be disappointed. They even talk to you 🙂 It started to rain a bit while using them and they're not water resistant but I just put my jumper over top of them and the sound came through it perfectly fine (not sure what Americans call it) and Kiwi's never even know what I mean when I say jumper as it's a Queensland/Australia term as far as I can tell. Once we'd done tinkering comparing detectors we started detecting, I wandered off 20 or so meters away from JW so I didn't interfere with his detector and started detecting some bedrock. I was running my GPX in Auto as if I tried manual 10 or Auto+ it became a bit too unstable for my liking I guess due to the nearby power lines. It wasn't long and I had a good target noise, super faint but very repeatable and after scraping away all the soil off the bedrock I was pretty sure it wasn't a pellet, I started breaking away the schist to try get down to it, I was attacking for for about 20 minutes and I guess JW noticed as he came over, I told him what's going on and showed him my target response at that time, it had improved to a point it was very obvious after smashing some bedrock away. He said lets check my 17" coil over it and see how it responds, so he waived the coil over it, nothing at all, he pushed the edges right into the cracks in the bedrock and nothing, he spent a bit of time trying to get a response from the target and he couldn't get one. We fired up my GPX again and waived it over it and straight away a reasonably good response. After seeing that I'm glad I didn't buy the 17" coil seeing we mostly hunt smaller gold it's not near got the sensitivity of the 11" on this stuff. to be completely blind to this piece when the 11" was getting it pretty easily. JW had also lost a couple of targets he was recovering with the 17" coil so we went over to them with the 11" and tried to find them, the 11" found one of the two lost targets straight away. JW then hung around to help recover the target, he's a lot better at getting gold out of bedrock than I am, I'm not aggressive and hack away at it slowly as I'm so scared I'll lose the nugget, it's happened before 🙂 He just smashes the hell out of it and gets it out quickly. It didn't take him too long and he had it out, as per usual with the GPX once the target is near the coil it ROARS on it, a few inches away and it's a quiet response so once out we had it in no time. The dug out bit of bedrock is below the coil in the photo above. The nugget circled. That's where it was, I was so surprised the 17" coil had no response on this nugget when in there, it was probably on its side in a layer of the schist but still, the 11" performed so much better. This is the nugget. I'm confident the GPZ with my favourite little 8" would have hit this far easier than the GPX did, it wasn't what I'd call deep but it was faint on the GPX and missed entirely by the 17" even with some of the bedrock broken away. Next up I kept detecting around this same bedrock and it falls off a bit of a cliff down to the river below, it's pretty wild on the way down but I went off the edge a bit as I could see an area I could start to get down and detected one of the many ledges on the way down, I found a few pellets down there but also a nugget. It was very shallow and a louder signal than a pellet. It was really only a couple of pick scrapes to remove the grass and I had it, it's lucky I wasn't being lazy ignoring the first pick scrapes assuming they're pellets. The reason I didn't ignore it and I ignore many pellets is the pellets the GPX finds harder to detect, sure it booms on them when you first go over them as they're close to the coil, you do a couple of pick scrapes and move the pellet into a pile of soil and the target signal drops off dramatically to a point they can entirely disappear or be very hard to locate compared to the screaming signal when they're near the coil so you find yourself flattening out the pile. It's a bit of a giveaway with lead pellets I think as gold tends to remain a decent signal as it's not as difficult of a target as a small sphere like a lead pellet. Here is a video of the spot the nugget was, not usual for me to go off edges like this I usually leave the mountain goat stuff for JW 🙂 My threshold was pretty savage in this video, I did a factory reset not long after this as it was starting to go wild. Good ol' Geosense. It's amazing doing a factory reset fixes it up when no amount of noise cancels will. I hope its a bug they can fix and a firmware update comes out some day. I decided I'd go back up to where I found the first one and give it another go, a couple of meters along the same run of bedrock I found another faint target signal that lived beyond clearing the dirt off the schist bedrock. Because I'd just only done the same thing I knew this was going to be gold so I did some filming. I didn't film the entire process as I'm very slow getting gold out of bedrock 🙂 This is the better video of the two to watch as it gives a better idea of the recovery I switch to manual 10 in the video from Auto and you'll see the target response improve, I just preferred hunting in Auto while I'm still getting used to the more ratty threshold of the GPX over the GPZ even though I know I'm taking a performance hit doing so. And the happy snaps. This one was a bit deeper than the last one, took me a long time to smash it out. A bit more of a ball nugget, again the GPZ would have hit it easily. It was now starting to rain a little bit and likely snowing on the mountains above us so our day we nearing the end, we only started around Lunch time so I was pretty happy with my results. JW at this stage had given up on the 17", I guess seeing it entirely miss the first target I got wasn't really encouraging. He'd put on the 14" DD now, I'm sure he wished his 11" wasn't away on warranty at this stage as he'd not found anything yet. I went back towards where we stored our bags and started detecting around there and found my last nugget of the day, another very simple target, it was in someone elses dig hole spoils, they'd dug up the nugget and rejected it, I guess they thought because it was in soil and not on or in the bedrock it wasn't gold, so I recovered it and it was my biggest of the day 🙂 It was right near where the cliff drops off to the river below. I checked with JW, it wasn't his dig hole so someone else had been there, he did point out when we arrived it looked like someone else had been there recently as there was dig holes that were not his so someone donated me a nugget. So overall my GPX was working much better at this spot, it still had its Geosense quirks and is nowhere near as stable as the GPZ, and the GPZ I know is just as sensitive if not more so than the GPX when its using small coils on the GPZ, it'll be interesting to see the improvements with the smaller coils on the GPX. Where the GPX appears to be more sensitive is small pellets near the coil with the way it really roars on them, but any depth on those little pellets and reality sets in, it's just hyper sensitive to targets close to the coil, it'd be good for bedrock hunting with that behaviour. My total for the afternoon. We bailed out because it started raining and only started at lunch time so a good result for me. JW found one little guy and that was once he changed over to the 14" DD, he was certainly digging away all day though, I could hear a lot of smashing on the bedrock! Damn pellets! My junk level was really low, I was rejecting known pellets by the strong pellet signal dropping off to next to nothing in the dig out pile quirk the GPX has. Those 22 shells give a nice massage with the Torus 🙂
    7 points
  28. This is not a defend Minelab at all costs post in spite of my constantly being accused of it, the following comments are just about trying to be factual and to provide a different POV otherwise a lot of discussions just turn into a Minelab bashing bitching second-guessing session which is fine if that’s what’s preferred but there is also a lot of non-factual information being sprouted along the way. I find myself wanting to post at times but then hit the wall of previous accusation so then decline, this means there is an atmosphere around that is killing discussion and debate ergo the potential to become very one sided as voices are slowly being shut up. Just my POV and how I feel every time things become heated and accusations of my being a Minelab lackey get brought up as a means to shut down my input. Even if you consider my input biased, and yes I am, although I do try to temper my comments, I do definitely lean towards Minelab because of my close association in product development, BUT consider this I am often only ‘one-voice’ compared to the MANY! The GPX 6000 has the same outright depth on large targets as the GPX 5000, it was never intended to compete with the GPZ7000 for depth and the supplied coils reflect that. The GPX17 elliptical was provided as a ground coverage coil for prospecting purposes as such it does an amazing job thanks to light weight and incredible sensitivity along with a bit more depth over the GPX11 coil, in essence the supplied coils compliment where the GPX6000 offers an advantage over previous machines. I’m not going to be crass and suggest operators go back to a 5000 with its plethora of large coils but essentially that was always going to be the case in the design parameters of the 6000 purely because most ground has been well gone over with many many varieties of coil sizes and designs for many years. This then leads to the announcement of aftermarket coils made under license (thank-you Minelab 🙏), manufacturers need to throw development dollars into a market where the most sales reside which explains the offerings, this also compliments what the GPX6000 does so much better than any other detector. The 6000 was never designed to outperform the GPX5000 for max depth, the technology is as good as the previous GPX machines but not better in that regard. I see little point in using a GPX6000 with a large coil attached when I can get better depth performance out of a GPZ7000 with the stock GPZ14 coil. I know not everyone can own both, but nor on the flip side, can I swing both at the same time, there will always be a compromise. I have to forgo quite a bit of easy gold for the GPX6000 when I choose to swing the GPZ7000. The GPX6000 is heavily weighted towards the ease of use simplicity side of detecting, it is biased towards where its underlying tech has a HUGE advantage, namely the smaller missed targets that still remain in goldfields areas, this has now been borne out by many many users world wide. You will notice there are some functions that are fixed in stone on the GPX6000, one is a continuous Auto Ground Balance with no FIXED option, there is no Threshold control or a Threshold Pitch control, these settings have all been optimised to keep ANY operator in the peak position to find gold. The settings are all optimised to ‘bark’ on a missed piece of gold so that any operator no matter how inexperienced or skilled can benefit from its abilities without the confusion of many many switches and settings combinations. The very fact that Minelab have created dedicated Auto modes that have a proper zero threshold function speaks to the effort and intelligent thought processes that have gone into its design, all happening under the hood in a non confusing fashion. This is just my 2 cents and they’re not aimed any anyone in particular, I consider Minelab allowing more coil choices so soon after the release of the GPX6000 to be a very positive thing, the fact that there are two aftermarket coil makers is a huge bonus. JP
    7 points
  29. Can’t wait to see the movie when it comes out! And will there be a sequel?
    7 points
  30. I'd say you're safely in the 1700's club with that buckle. Nice finds! 👍 Can't find one like it (it's very simple) in the buckle book, but it's definitely cast, not stamped. Pretty early 18th century. Well I found it 😀 1720-1790. 👍 You may also find the "how to" interesting as well: https://www.colonialwilliamsburg.org/learn/living-history/buckle/
    7 points
  31. Jim didn't do all that many posts, but when he did they were an education. Lots of the long time detector users are happy to share their knowledge to help others, and it's always been encouraged on this forum and the forum has thrived because of it. I'm sure he is fine, perhaps life got in the way, maybe he's found a great silver hunting spot and it's consuming his time. 🤞 We certainly aren't ready for a guard changeover yet, far too much knowledge is locked up in the older members brains that us younger guys are completely unaware of for that to be the case. I've got far too much to learn yet for any of the older members to kick the bucket so I won't allow it, nobody is going anywhere!
    7 points
  32. Nice gold Geoff and I agree with the wording too. If I already owned a GM1000 and wanted to buy just one single detector to use in the Rockies, it'd be the 6000. Just be ready to noise cancel it often if you use the speaker or work close to EMI sources. The 7000 was an absolute bear to use in Colorado the one day I tried (I dislocated my shoulder falling after trying to detect a steep incline, so trip ended), and having also been to BC, things are just as steep and even more vegetated up there. It's been long enough since the 7000 release that a new one must be on the horizon soon so it's not really a machine I'd recommend anyone to buy right now really until we see what the next one costs and how it performs.
    7 points
  33. No contest, the 6000. I spend most of my time chasing pocket gold in the PNW woods. No harness, just a backpack and GPX in hand. Try swinging a GPZ with the harness, bungee, and swing arm for a few hours in the brush. Or even just bushwhacking to that mine a mile up the mountain. I did for a year and then got a GPX6000 when it came out. That and the fact that you are chasing small gold makes it an easy choice to me. Keep in mind if the areas you are detecting have been worked, you will have days where you dig hundreds of pieces of iron, lead, and tin. I just got off one of those trips and it can be frustrating. But the days where you find some nice gold make it worth it!
    7 points
  34. Depth isn't as important as you might be thinking it is. If you are in mostly undetected country, then most of the gold within reach of a 7000 is also still within reach of a 6000. The two are separated in terms of inches, or less depending on the coils and nuggets. What is most important at your experience level is learning to find good gold first, and the 6000 is built for that type of exploration. In steep, vegetated terrain, the GPZ is very difficult to use. And the 19" coil isn't a whole lot deeper, but is a whole lot heavier. It's the last coil I'd ever consider using up in the mountains, in fact I'd never use it for anything personally. Also: in highly uneven mountainous terrain, or working cuts and steeps, the bungee/harness doesn't help much at all. The 6000 is purpose built for working steeps, finding patches, and general exploration. The 7000 is built for getting another few inches depth in patches you've already found, or other known ground where you suspect the gold is hiding inches beyond what the 6000 can hear. In glacial terrain the depth of the detector isn't nearly as important as learning to find shallower ground. Glaciers leave gold so chaotically distributed that prospecting skill is far more valuable than having the best detector, and IMO the 6000 is the best detector by far to explore with and develop such a skillset.
    6 points
  35. More likely an adventure novel than a treatise. It probably starts something like " Danby couldn't believe what he had just overheard in the dark corner of the bar...he told himself it was a bar rumer. Still, he may have have to travel up to this bench off the left fork of Goat Creek. If there were nuggets as big as your thumb...
    6 points
  36. I work in and around one of the Lyme Disease epicenters in the US. Having had Lyme perhaps half a dozen times, I’ve done some experiments. My current system is full coverall’s treated with Sawyer permethrin. I also treat my socks. This setup is highly effective. Since adopting it, I have not contracted Lyme. I also use Sawyer picaridin as a spray on when mosquitoes are bad (La Crosse encephalitis, West Nile, Zika…). We also have a recent emergence of Lone Star ticks, which I have personally collected a few. Lastly, in the rare event I find a tick on myself, carefully remove it (duh!) and take two doxycycline as a prophylactic. The system I use has prevented any tick-borne diseases since I fully implemented it.
    6 points
  37. So, I have been MIA to detecting for the past 2 weeks, as I had my second date with Covid. 🙄 She visits me every 2 years and this time was no fun as well. 😄. A buddy of mine wanted to do an E Trac hunt, so I met him at a church built in the 1940’s but on a very old piece of land. I also brought the Equinox 800 and the GPX 5000. I started the hunt with the E Trac and a 13” Ultimate coil (that I just purchased here recently). It took me a bit to remember how to use it in this kind of EMI setting, but it worked very well finding me an 1852 Large cent at around 9”. I ran it for about 2 hours and found some memorials and a couple of wheats. I decided to switch and try the Equinox. Now the selling point of the Equinox is its multi-frequency technology, so I wasn’t interested in hunting with the 20 or 40 Khz frequencies, as I was looking for deep silver. The Equinox didn’t fare well with the EMI, so off to the car trunk it went. I then pulled out the GPX with a Detech 11” DD coil. It was noisy, but bearable as I ran it with very mild settings. The last 2 hours of the hunt were the most fun as I could almost run with the GPX and just bang out coin after coin, all around the 6” mark. This section I was doing had almost no trash or iron, just coins. There wasn’t a pull tab to be found, and besides some modern clad, every cent there was a wheat cent. So, the GPX found both silvers and a lot of wheats including a decent 1921. It was a ton of fun and I was just glad to get out and hunt after sitting home for all those days.
    6 points
  38. The whole idea of flat wound is to increase the sensitivity on older MPS machines up to the GPX5000 with DVT, however it comes at a price and as such could be considered a not so elegant way of achieving that desire with clear disadvantages in detector behaviour especially with ground signals such as X and saturation signals. The way its been explained to me is in essence the flat wound coils force the GPX 5000 and below series to demodulate early, something the electronics where never designed to do, as such there are some undesirable outcomes that come along for the ride. I personally would not like to be using a ‘dedicated’ flat wound on a ‘designed from the ground up’ PI like the GPX6000 as its electronics have been developed to do a far better job of early sampling and ground handling than a flat wound could ever emulate on previous machines thanks to GeoSense. As you can imagine the 6000 has massive headroom sensitivity wise so anything smaller than the standard 11” mono is intrinsically going to have even MORE sensitivity, anyone designing a coil for the 6000 is going to have to make sure it is usable in all areas and I presume to that end will need to satisfy intense Minelab scrutiny prior to being released to the public. Based on my experiences with the Nugget Finder 12x7 Xceed it is not a dedicated flat wound winding, it did not show the typical difficulty in pinpointing a target a flat wound demonstrates especially when moving/retrieving a tiny target across the windings but did show amazing sensitivity and ground handling ability. During my time with it target retrieval and pinpointing with the NF 12x7 Xceed where very exact and precise. Hope this helps JP
    6 points
  39. I do use permetherin - it works well to repel ticks and you don’t have to put poison directly on your skin. When I need to apply repellant directly to my skin I use Natrapel which uses Picardin. I don’t have experience with Deep Woods Off V Ticks, sorry, but if it contains between 20 to 30% DEET by volume as advertised, it should be a very effective repellant. See this “Prevention” article for more info on effective repellent active ingredients (DEET, Picardin, Eucalyptus Oil, etc.) and suggested products. Note Off Deep Woods Insect Repellant V (essentially the same product you mentioned above), is highly rated for effectiveness in this article. https://www.prevention.com/health/a22095155/best-tick-repellents/
    6 points
  40. A while back while on a prospecting trip with a buddy I told him the 6K was finding gold the size of #9 bird shot easily. When I got home I found a #8 shot shell and opened it up to compare as I did not have any #9 shot shells. To my surprise the size varied substantially of the pellets in the #8 shell. I've nothing new to add here but this 🙂
    6 points
  41. Thanks for the replies - and some good questions. Phrunt - answers are weights of the coils are on the website now: https://coiltek.com.au/coils/goldhawk-series/ 9" = 700gms inc skid plate 10x5" = 575gm inc skid plate 14x9" = 900gm inc skid plate Plastics are UV rated ABS There isnt many plastics that wont scratch in the field with dirt being scrapped over the coils. the labels are a polycarb so are very durable and will look great even if rubbed over with the scoop. coils are quite robust to handle many conditions yes waterproof to 1 mtr. All coils are bunched windings. Hope this helps answer your initial queries and I am sure more will be answered once the coils are out in the field after July 14th Thanks, Trevor
    6 points
  42. It's great you were able to track him down Lanny. I'm also a bit worried about Jim Hemmingway, he's disappeared off the radar too. I hope he's OK.
    6 points
  43. Well, the 1st week of 6000 fun is now done....the result is 45 bits of gold weighing 7.19 grams...just shy of quarter ounce. Upside is that most locations that I've flogged to death are producing gold again and I've gotten used to the low groan signals that indicate deeper small gold. Biggest bit so far is just .71 grams and that was @ 8" deep. I'm sure the sizes will improve soon lol. Only downside is that the stem lock is now starting to loosen...I'll blame the 14DD coil as it provides a lot more canting movement due to its width. Its like it has worn down the grip coz of the numerous re-adjustments. There's a lot to love though...low weight (crucial for me coz of my damaged shoulder), reduction in ground noise, ease of use, the excellent 14DD coil near powerlines and just sheer performance on small gold. 32.9 grams to go.....
    6 points
  44. I believe they got a few detect-spurts to compete with the Nokta Nomads and Garrett whatsyoumahcallthems that other companies are using. I don't really hear much from these spurts though, The old treasuretalks used to be good but I guess they were more designed for those with a technical interest, it's all about hyping things up these days with over excited people doing artificial videos and maybe Minelab can't be bothered with that. Marketing has never been their strong point from what I've seen, although they don't need to do much marketing, we the users do it for them, and there is no better marketing than word of mouth.
    6 points
  45. A super nice couple on 1750's farmhouse Place ooozes history. My first time out I found a great Horseshoe with Nails still in it. That was awesome because the place used to be a horse farm....at one point.. Then I found the button. I can't place the date, but looks like half of a two piece button. Maybe late 1800's? but could be more modern. Also 7 9mm bullets, golf balls lol and some other garbage. There is also a bottle dump there I didn't even look at yet. I guess this is my first good permission! Such wonderful people, I insisted they keep the horse shoe and they flatly refuse, "Keep everything just send me a picture" Just got one thing to say about that.....Thank you Lord Jesus!!!!!
    6 points
  46. Ok, this is weird. Found this: https://www.antiquesnavigator.com/d-1221159/unusual-antique-iron-straight-jacket-padlock--key-vintage-buckle-lock-restraint.html Here is the comparison: Mine is brass, with rusty mechanism.
    6 points
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