Jump to content

Tony

Member
  • Content Count

    163
  • Joined

  • Last visited

 Content Type 

Forums

Detector Prospector Magazine

Detector Database

Downloads

Calendar

Everything posted by Tony

  1. My beaches are typically very low mineralisation so I run with GB off and get better depth as well as that super smooth threshold that alerts you to the smallest and deepest targets.
  2. Okay......I run with GB off so all single tone for me. I think the low/high tone cut-off is also dependant on the GB setting.
  3. I think Google Translate hasn't helped here.............not sure what the question is.......sorry.
  4. Nice finds Gerry.......I am loving this machine and it has found me some nice stuff already and deep ! I have discovered that if you get a whisper break in that super smooth threshold and that the target signature is very narrow at the surface....you need to prepare yourself for some digging. I found a stretch of beach that was very low, hardpan, dense crushed shell and limestone......dug some nice gold and green coins but those tear-drop fishing sinkers take some digging at 20" down..........all 28 of them ! ............I wouldn't have it any other way............? Tony PS..........Thanks for looking after me with getting the detector. Still can't get them here yet !
  5. Hello Dale, My 4S battery charges automatically to about the same (16.7v) and absolutely no problems with the detector at all. I keep track of the run time on my pack and swap out after 7 hours. This is assuming a 4S1P pack of about 3250mah. The BMS built into my pack will automatically disengage the battery at around 10v (or 2.5v per cell). I won't let it drop this low in order to maximise the overall life of the batteries better and therefore get many more cycles from the pack. After 7 hours detecting my pack is around the 12v mark (or 3v per cell). Tony
  6. Looks good.......just make sure you know which leads are + - (If you ever have to re-connect)as I see both wires are red. Happy hunting, Tony
  7. Hello Dale, If using loose cells in a 18650 holder then I would recommend individually protected cells as they will automatically cut out if you run them too low (less than 2.5v usually). I think all 18650 packs (4 x 18650 in series shrink wrapped style like my photo) have an inbuilt BMS (Battery Management System) which does the same job. I won't use unprotected cells either individually or as a pack. I think the "flat" unprotected cells are designed for a BMS to be built into the battery pack as a DIY. The standard 4 x 18650 battery holders have to be trimmed down significantly in order to fit into the detector. It can be done with a bit of work but I much prefer the single battery pack of 4 x 18650 in series, aka, 4S1P. Also, if using loose cells in a battery holder, a button top is needed in order for the + side of the battery to engage the + battery holder contact. So for me personally, an all in one protected 4S1P pack is the way to go with it's own dedicated charger (cheap to buy). I will keep my loose Panasonic button top protected cells and use them in my 3 x 18650 battery holders for when I'm happy to run a lower voltage and depth isn't critical. I hope this helps, Tony. PS...............Awesome detector by the way.
  8. Thanks for the file. I might print some up. How is the battery pack secured against the 3D battery connector? Regards, Tony
  9. I advise strongly not to re-engineer a protected Lithium Ion battery pack as a short is an easy mistake to make.........it may not end well and if you create a problem with the battery pack inside the detector then goodbye detector....seriously, it will destroy the detector and will leave you a smoking pile of plastic. Please be careful, Tony
  10. This is what they are at our large Hardware store; You can but these separately if a 10 pack is too much. In your country they may be called something else? You need the 6mm hole otherwise it will not slide over the battery connector. Tony
  11. Thanks Steve......I am up now and had my coffee....? I have taken some sequential photo's which I hope describes the process so here goes; 1. Buy some of these from your hardware store. They are often found in the general electrical section, very cheap. You need to make sure that the round hole is wide enough to pass over the detector's battery contacts. 2. Remove the screws and discard the plastic insulator shell as this is no longer needed because of the lack of space getting to the battery contact points. 3. Re-insert screws just enough so they don't drop out. This can also be done after soldering the wires to the brass terminal. 4. Strip ends of both wires (not shown) and solder to the sides of the brass screw terminals. Lightly rough up where the solder will go. You don't need much solder, just a small blob. Make sure the wires are facing out towards you when you solder them up. I wanted to solder the wires through the bottom holes (for a better mechanical connection) but it took up too much space and the connector wouldn't slide over the battery contacts. The connection on the side is still very strong and this way, the wires come directly out. 5. Solder other leads to a DC connector or whatever mating connector you require for your battery pack. Make sure you know where the +- leads go. I already had a DC plug wired up so I just joined the wires and applied some shrink tube to the joins. Shorting a Lithium battery is scary ! 6. The last bit is a bit tricky. You need to hold the wire (soldered to brass screw terminal) with your finger against the screwdriver and reach down to work the screw terminal's hole over the battery contacts. Tighten the screw firmly and it will secure against the battery contact. You don't need to tighten the screw too hard. This is about the best I can describe the process. So far, the setup works perfectly. Periodically, you can check that the securing screw hasn't loosened off. Tony.
  12. I'm not sure I understand your question...... All connections are done through the battery compartment but you need a very long and thin screwdriver to be able to reach down and tighten the screws. There is definitely no need to open up the detector. I hope this has answered your question. I don't understand "screw to neutral" ?? Maybe lost in translation? Tony
  13. Just to clarify....the bare wires are soldered directly to the side of the brass screw terminals. The screw terminals have a small hole through them which slide in over the battery contacts and then the screw is tightened to secure the leads. Sliding the screw terminals over the battery contacts is a bit tricky as the contacts are kind of "L" shaped. Select a screw terminal that has a big enough hole to get over the contacts. Tony
  14. Just thought I'd post this............. I now run a 14.8v pack (4 x 18650 cells in series) which gives me a 7 hour run time. My previous version used loose cells in a holder but I wasn't happy with that. I made up a battery lead that connects directly to the battery compartment contacts with small brass "screw terminal" connectors soldered with 22AWG wire. A bit fiddly to hook up (long and narrow screw driver needed to tighten the two terminal screws) but very secure and + - leads well apart to avoid a short. I may put in place a rubber divider that further separates the +- battery contacts but the screw connectors are quite secure. The battery pack fits in snugly and does not move around at all. I deliberately made the wire lead long enough so the battery can be unplugged with the excess lead bundled inside the battery compartment. Tony
  15. So far, the detector has exceeded my expectations. I can't fault anything at all. The performance (sensitivity and stability) is the best I have experienced on any beach detector (VLF or PI). I run a 14.8v pack (4 x 18650 cells in series) which gives me a 7 hour run time. I made up a battery lead that connects directly to the battery compartment contacts with small brass "screw terminal" connectors soldered with 22AWG wire. A bit fiddly to hook up (long and narrow screw driver needed) but very secure and + - leads well apart to avoid a short. Tony PS...I will post this a separate thread.
  16. Yep, my TDIBH unboxing took me 11.25 seconds flat.......there's took over 13 minutes....amateurs.....? When I unbox a new detector, family know to give me plenty of elbow space because my 6 foot and 200 pound frame doesn't stop until the box is in several pieces and the user manual is dispatched into some corner.....................I really should video the event someday. Tony
  17. I am also looking at the Sanyo 20700's in a 4S1P setup. These are rated at 4250mah and of course you get the 14.8v nominal. I need to check the clearance with the 20mm height and 70mm width but I think it's possible. Have the BMS fitted to the pack as there is now room. More details soon ! Tony
  18. 8 x 18650 can fit but very difficult with the balancing wires or BMS fitted. I am happy with the 4S1P setup......7 hours run time at the higher voltage. Easy enough to swap out fresh batteries on the beach and away from the water. TDI platform is safe at 16.8v.
  19. If you ever want to make and sell some of those 3D end pieces, I'd be interested. Nice work, Tony
  20. Here are the results of the Panasonic 4 x 18650 cells (3400 mah) On my Xtar charger, I get very close to the stated capacity which is appreciated (thanks to Panasonic). I got a comfortable 7 hours operating time (Max GAIN and 10uS) with a just audible THRESHOLD and VOLUME The pack started out at 16.3v (down from the 16.6v fully charged as I had used it for about 30 minutes) After 1 hour the pack read 15.7v (a drop of 0.6v) After 2 hours the pack read 15.20v (a drop of 0.5v) After 3 hours the pack read 14.70v (a drop of 0.5v) After 4 hours the pack read 14.20v (a drop of 0.5v) After 5 hours the pack read 13.65v (a drop of 0.55v) After 6 hours the pack read 12.55v (a drop of 1.1v) After 6.5 hours the pack read 11.80v (a drop of 0.75v) Each battery tested and found to be about 2.95v to 3.00v In summary, the pack will give about 7 hours of run time before the pack reaches to 12v mark (or 3v per cell). This is a generous built in safety margin as the low voltage cutoff built into each cell is 2.5v. Some people believe not to discharge below 3v. As you can see, the first 5 hours discharge is very linear but accelerates for the final 2 hours. As expected, the depth drops off slightly but only noticeable/measurable at around the 5 hour mark. This pack will be perfect for in the water as 7 hours deep digging in the water is plenty for me. If on the beach then a battery swap after 5 hours is easy enough. Tony.
  21. I thought I'd copy this from my other thread which was buried down on the second page.......is this okay Steve as I don't want to duplicate if unnecessary? "Just got back from the beach....in one word.........awesome. Some observations; It is the deepest detector I have ever used on the beach (in the past 25 years) by running the higher voltage pack. It is the first time I have ever detected (with any detector, including the Minelab PI's) my gold wedding ring at a measured/buried 18" deep. The US nickel can be heard at 16" in buried wet sand...but with GB OFF. With GB ON it drops to 12"-13" ! My machine is much deeper with GB OFF across all targets.....the rock solid threshold with GB OFF is unbelievable with no loss of sensitivity. Even with the coil swept through shallow salt water at max gain and 10us......it is so smooth. I don't know how White's have done it....maybe a new batch of the latest flux capacitors...... I tried with GB on but in clean white sand, there was no perfect GB....it was close but just a slight positive signal as the coil was lowered to the ground...but the depth loss was significant with GB on and slight falsing with higher GAIN. None of this is a problem with GB OFF." Tony PS.......on the real deepies (edge of detectability), there is often a one, two and three way signal but not a four way signal if swept from left,right and up and down.
  22. I am currently monitoring the run time on my 4 x 18650 pack. If I can get around 6-7 hours before the overall pack drops below 12v then I am happy. The Panasonic 18650 cells have the inbuilt low voltage cutoff at 2.5v per cell or 10v overall but I plan to build in more safety margin.....more details soon. Back to your last post.....I was trying to work out how to connect directly to the detector's contact pins but it is not easy. One way is to try different size female spade connectors (or similar) and with very long thin nosed pliars, reach down and gently push the (pre-wired +-) connectors on...........fiddly but workable with the right tool.
  23. Just got back from the beach....in one word.........awesome. Some observations; It is the deepest detector I have ever used on the beach (in the past 25 years) by running the higher voltage pack. It is the first time I have ever detected (with any detector, including the Minelab PI's) my gold wedding ring at a measured/buried 18" deep. The US nickel can be heard at 16" in buried wet sand...but with GB OFF. With GB ON it drops to 12"-13" ! My machine is much deeper with GB OFF across all targets.....the rock solid threshold with GB OFF is unbelievable with no loss of sensitivity. Even with the coil swept through shallow salt water at max gain and 10us......it is so smooth. I don't know how White's have done it....maybe a new batch of the latest flux capacitors...... I tried with GB on but in clean white sand, there was no perfect GB....it was close but just a slight positive signal as the coil was lowered to the ground...but the depth loss was significant with GB on and slight falsing with higher GAIN. None of this is a problem with GB OFF. Tony
  24. Some good information here....I used to run the Beach Hunter 300 so I am used to the positive buoyancy. I use an "S" shaft when in the water as I find it easier to leverage more downward force if needed. On the beach itself, I will carry a spare battery pack (sealed in ziplock bag) but in the water, the 4 x 18650 (3300mah measured) should give me 6-7 hours run time. .............now, if you'll excuse me, I'm off to the beach ! Tony
×
×
  • Create New...