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karelian

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  1. I remember reading about it when the kids found the nugget. Also remember that the Skylab bits and pieces in Western Australia started the electronic gold rush for many of us. Just reminds me I'm getting old. When I read about large gold finds I tend to research the area and look at the type of ground it was found in, helps me focus on the geology and improve my odds of finding the yellow. People have learnt to keep the location of the finds to themselves these days, who can blame them?
  2. Depending on what you are swinging. Size does matter.. for extra penetration of hard ground.
  3. As time goes on I hope to see more videos of the Garrett 24k used all over the world. The 24k does seem to impress those who have used it. We can never have too much choice when it comes to machines. As good as the new GPX 6000 is on small gold I still believe there is room for a good VLF in the arsenal. All the best.
  4. Yep, in lockdown so was home for the show. Did the walk around and checked the house, no cracks or any damage. Had a few smaller ones but for Melbourne this was the biggest in my experience. Animals are sensitive to these things, someone forgot to tell our cat who snoozed through the whole thing. It has been an interesting year for sure. All the best.
  5. strick the pick holder was made by Double D Leather and Canvas in Australia.
  6. A 4x4 in on my wish list, until then I'll have to do it the hard way. A decent pair of boots will have to do for now.
  7. I have found that terrain and season play a big part in what backpack and other gear is used. During summer I stay close to my vehicle and use it as my base. I strip my webbing down to the minimum. The heat being the main consideration. Spring and autumn enable me to use a fully loaded battle belt rig that allows me full autonomy for a day, returning to the vehicle in the evening. If hiking into areas I use either a Savotta 339 framed pack or a surplus pack designed for military radios. I can customise the milspec frame pack to suit the location and type of prospecting. I never wear a pack when detecting, even the battle belt rig is too hot in summer. GPS, emergency beacon, radio/phone, detector, pan, med kit etc All that stuff adds up. I like milspec surplus because it allows me to add or reduce the load quick and easy whilst customising the rig. Comfort and safety are always my first consideration. Water tends to be the main challenge. At the end of the day, whatever works for you.
  8. The 24k is well sealed, but for Australia and other regions, dust resistant as well. Amazing how that fine red dust gets into everything. At the end of the day give it a wipe and it is good to go. I had to use Pelican cases for my camera gear just to keep the dust out.. The new generation of metal detectors have much improved weather resistance which helps keep the dirt out. The ability with the GMX to be submerged in shallow water is an additional advantage which I doubt I'll ever fully exploit. The detectors improved robustness and ability to fit into my backpack are more useful features for me. The surplus framed pack was designed to carry a radio, adapts perfectly to allow prospecting gear, a pan and detector to fit into the radio slot. A light weight VLF machine is a perfect match and allows me to explore further out.
  9. The one thing about the GMX placement for the headphones connector is that it is perfect for adding a wireless module or an external speaker. The idea of a waterproof detector is great, but 90% of my detecting is well away from any water. The inbuilt speaker is not very loud, so it is either wireless headphones or external speaker on dry land. Waterproof headphones anywhere near water. The Garrett Goldmaster 24K makes more sense to me now, but I'll persist with the GMX. I get a bit of a kick since it is probably the only example in Australia and I've got it set up just the way I like it.
  10. Tony given the exchange rate, transport and logistics I understand pricing is always going to be higher. I don't mind it when there is local sales and aftersales service, repair and warranty. Look after your dealer and he should also look after you. Minelab enjoys big advantages in Australia, not enjoyed by the importers.. but yes the price does hamper local sales. The Minelab Gold Monster does enjoy a price advantage, but it is not all about price. Sometimes we just 'click' with a machine, be it a car, rifle, camera or metal detector. It just does things the way we like, feels the right way, balances well etc. There is a market for the Garrett Goldmaster 24k in Australia, because it is different. It gives us choice. Wait for the feedback, I think people will be happy with little buyer remorse. White's GMX, still loving it. I'm with phrunt on this one.
  11. Once mounted, it is difficult to remove the 6" concentric from the GMX, it is simply that good. Some images of the coil mounted on the GMX and other images for comparison. I'm very pleased Garrett has continued with the 24k, worthy of a second chance.
  12. Only a matter of time before these start to ship out in Australia. Full credit to Garrett for doing a better job in marketing and sales, they are moving fast. Now available for sale in Australia.
  13. Snake Skinz are not waterproof, it will shade the cable preventing or slowing further UV damage. You can still inspect the coil when the Snake Skinz is on. I repair coils with tape, heat shrink rubber tubing, liquid rubber film that is painted on. All effective but look terrible, the Snake Skinz is purely cosmetic in that it improves UV protection and appearance. I applied these remedies before the cable broke and exposed the inner wires. Living in Australia I think it is a good preventative for sun damage, whilst looking kind of cool. All the best.
  14. I had one coil that had a cable that was badly sun burnt and brittle. A bit of heat shrink and tape fixed it, but looked nasty. The Snake Skinz covered the mess nicely. Looks like a useful solution to a common problem. Probably will fit most coils, certaily good camo for repairs. All the best.
  15. Curl, try Snake Skinz as they sound like just what you are after.
  16. I like the Tdi Pro and Tdi Sl, but I am a beach detectorist who sometimes likes to go bush and explore the goldfields. So having used these machines almost under 'all conditions' I have some idea of how they perform at their best. Mainly on the beach, that is where they make the most sense. They will however allow decent peformance when relic hunting and prospecting or even coin hunting on specific locations. For an PI machine they offer us the ability to set the machine up for a variety of conditions. If I ever hunt in the UK for Roman or Viking treasure, I'll have at least a Tdi Pro or SL with me. This versatility, ability and the price were major considerations. As I am slowly moving towards 'gearing up' with the addition of a 4x4, camper trailer etc, the idea of spending tens of thousand on these items and then not buying something like the GPX 6000 does not really make sense. Minelab make excellent prospecting detectors and investments in technology that translate into increased peformance. For the beach I will probably continue with the Tdi, it does it so well. Other companies may step up to the plate and offer an alternative to the GPX 6000, I am not in a hurry. Pity Whites is gone but Minelab is doing well in advancing the game for both professionals and folks like me who consider it a hobby. I no longer shoot film in my cameras, digital all the way and I'm better for it. A GPX for prospecting and the Tdi for the beach. Technology moves on and more often than not, it is to our benefit. Now begins the 'long' wait for GPX 6000 machines to appear on the used market. I'll keep saving and wait for the opportunity to make the updates. Until then I'll keep using what I have, still bringing home some good finds and having lots of fun in the process. All the best.
  17. Must mention that whilst a small DD is great, a small six inch concentric will offer excellent results. On my GMX that flat bottomed coil is nothing short of superb. New Garrett 24k customers should chase up the older coil or hopefully new ones will soon be on offer. With the MXT I often used the Eclipse 5.3, even when the ground made it noisy. The 24K flat bottom designed six inch concentric is nicer but the older Eclipse performed well, despite being a bit fat or chunky in comparison. If the ground will allow it, outperforms all DD coils for depth and sensitivity on the smaller targets. All the best.
  18. Tony I have managed to run the MXT in awful ground, the key for me has been the smaller 6x4 DD Shooter coil combined with lowering the gain. Just lower the gain until the machine is stable. In trash I use audio disc, zip vs grunt. Start by digging everything and getting an idea of the type of rubbish in the area. Some areas have few if any bullets, pull tabs or other modern junk. Sometimes rusty iron, old tin cans, rusty tools or even metal gold pans dominate. After digging everything in trashy sites I'll go hard with disc if modern trash dominates or continue to dig everything if 'old' trash or 'relics' are present. In gold country the 6x4 DD is my go to coil with the MXT. Great for crevicing and bedrock. Your MX7 with a small DD should give you an idea of what is possible. Some good advice on this thread, no need for another machine, just mount a small DD coil. Tony what coils do you have for your MX7?
  19. The 6 inch concentric coil on the 24k/GMX is fantastic, excellent in moderate ground but still usable as the ground gets hotter. For hot ground with trash, the 6x4DD or an equivalent would be a better choice. A time goes on there may be more coil choices available. WA is an area that makes any VLF hard work, not sure the 24k would be any different. For exposed bedrock, surfaced areas or very shallow ground the pain may be worth the gain. Trashy areas combined with very nasty ground, I'd walk away or reach for my MXT with the 6x4DD. I know the MXT well and have more confidence with it in such a demanding scenario. A few more hundred hours with the GMX, maybe I'd have a go. Tony, put that small coil on the Xl Pro, run in hot rock reject, SAT GEB, with low gain and see how it goes. I took mine out to Dunolly for a run, found a six pence and a half penny hidden among trash. A bit of fun. It's old tech but it id's iron well enough. I'd be very interested to see if the old girl can run smooth on the Mars landscape you have out West.
  20. The GPX6000 sounds like a winning formula, performance matched to light weight and good balance.. Tony I'm keen for people to buy a load of them, in a year or two I will be looking at the used market. Sometimes it pays to take a step back and let the dust settle. Time is on our side, more information, accessories etc I will make a better educated purchase when the time is right. All the best.
  21. There is no numeric answer, we set the gain to match the ground conditions, the hotter the ground the less gain.. In hot ground a gain of 3 or 4 is decent for the first Tdi machines and the Tdi Pro. Don't fall into the trap of thinking you need to have maximum gain to get results. A smooth and stable machine is usually the best bet, even if it comes at the expense of having to search at a lower gain. When ground balancing do it with a lower gain at first and then experiment with the gain to see how high you can go without making the machine unstable. Every time you adjust the gain, repeat the ground balance. Every time I go to a new location I experiment with the machine to see which combination of threshold, ground balancing and gain works best. Always carry a test nugget, I use a 1 grain gold ingot.. Give yourself a bit of time to experiment and play at the start of your hunt, to see what settings work best for that location. The type of gold found in the area, the amount of iron trash etc determine Hi Low or ALL conductivity and coil selection. Again with the original Tdi, in hot ground a threshold of 3 or 4 sounds alright and I don't think you are missing anything.
  22. Just a bit of information on the Vaughan area as shown on old and new maps. The drone footage was over Ballarat Hill with the maps showing the same area.
  23. The Porcupine Ridge Rd area is reputed to have produced some larger gold. Surprisingly little historical information compared to other areas. A very interesting area full of promise still. Lots of bullets on the hillside above the river, rabbits still hopping around. Met a very large brown snake who didn't stop to say hello, thank goodness.. I'll be spending some more time in the area. The mineral water at the spring tasted awful.. not going back for seconds. Ballarat Hill is quite distinct and even more so from the air. Pity the larger portion being on private property. Took me a while to work out the boundaries but once you figure it out there is still a decent area to detect. Moving south there is less private land and things open right up. The lack of a 4x4 has hampered my efforts to some extent but I've got a decent pair of boots that compensates. I think I left a few bits of my car on the Wewak Track. The sound of my car crunching and scraping on rocks is equal to fingernails on a chalk board, just more expensive. The situation with the bridge is a disgrace and symbolic in so many ways with local governments priorities not reflecting community needs. Years ago I drove over the bridge on a few occasions and it always looked as if it was ready to give way.. I've just spent a bit of time in Eastern Victoria and the scrub was so thick it was challenging to swing the detector.. with a Red Bellied Blacksnake for every hundred meters of creek.. Vaughan is a much easier place to prospect despite the occasional brown..
  24. I've got all my fingers, like to keep it that way... a healthy respect for those high rpm propellers. The Mavic is so stable that hand launches and retrievals are almost routine with some operators, I'm not there yet..
  25. I'm using a DJI Mavic Air, mated to an ipad with the controller. I carry four spare batteries and spares etc Everything fits into a smallish Pelican style carry case to keep dirt and dust away. Because I always fly within visual range as per rules.. I sometimes use a spotter with binoculars, safe range out to 1 km, often much less. I use mining records and maps to find locations of interest. Google earth narrows it down a bit also. Finally once I have arrived on the goldfield the drone allows me to fine focus my attention on specific locations. I print out a hard copy mini map of areas I intend to search, then use a pen to mark areas of interest as I search that area by drone and on foot. A printed map works for me, digital alternatives on the ipad are used in camp to plan the days search. Research and planning.. analog and digital. Quickly learned that large metal objects like cars and hot mineralized ground play havoc with the drones electronic compass. Calibrate well away from the car and off the ground, then launch the drone from a tree stump if available.. The birds eye view helps me find the best parking spot and camp site. Quickly identifies the boundaries between private property and public land. Just a very useful tool in new areas. All the best.
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