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ShintoSunrise

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  1. Found 15 to 18 inches deep... That must have been at the raw edge of detection depth, and in saltwater no less, which is damn Impressive.
  2. Hey all, while researching this question myself I came across a technical write-up from Minelab I hadn't seen before; sharing here in case others found it interesting! https://www.minelab.com/__files/f/11043/KBA_METAL_DETECTOR_BASICS_&_THEORY.pdf
  3. Fantastic discussion folks, and many thanks for the explanations given as they fit well into my own understanding. While there are obviously many gray areas in target interrogation methods and results will be highly dependent on target composition, depth, environmental context, etc, I would be interested to hear what other phenomenon folks have noticed and whether they've been able to turn them into general rules. The 10hz check would be one example, or pumping a coil to detect for iron tones.
  4. Greetings fellow detectorists, I'm hoping someone with a deeper understanding of the technological methods of the Equinox series might be able to shed some light on why certain Interrogation methods work they do. I think we are all aware of the little trick whereby a potential target in the mid conductor range in multi frequency can be examined in 10hz; a sudden jump from the teens to the twenties indicates a likely bottle cap. My questions are two fold; first, what is responsible for this phenomenon? Why does a change in frequency potentially change the vdi of a target, and what determines wh
  5. Agreed, I too often get caught up in only focusing on mid and high tones myself, so I'm glad I did dig this one up. The piece simply says "BANK" across the front with no additional text. Here's a photo of it shortly after coming out of the ground for comparison purposes.
  6. Hey folks! Unlike many of you more seasoned folks, I'm still trying to learn when to ignore iron tones and when to dig. I was exploring the land behind what I knew once belonged to a northern Virginia farmhouse back in the 1930s and heard a nice iron tone that I felt was worth looking into. Lo and behold, an incredibly well rusted cast iron piggy bank. Following some electrolysis and wire brushing I find it to be pretty presentable. I'm unsure of the age, but based on some research I'm guessing circa 1900s. Cheers!
  7. Welcome to the forum! I'm also a newbie and looking to absorb the knowledge of the pros around here. Where are you in Virginia? I'm up in Loudoun myself
  8. I've heard of gold in Virginia and I know a bit of the history, but my understanding is that it is mostly in flake form and nuggets are extremely rare. Not sure if my 600 is up to the task! I'm mostly looking for relics and jewelry, though if course won't say no to interesting coins
  9. Hey all, I'm currently hunting in Ashburn, so maybe what, an hour or so from Culpeper?
  10. Hey all, Eric here; Los Angeles native but long-time transplant to the DC metro area. Got back into detecting recently with an equinox 600 after a 20 year hiatus from the hobby. I have an upcoming move to the Seattle/Bellevue area in spring; anyone on this forum know how the hunting is over there? In the interim, any old hands out here in NoVa? I know an interesting spot I've been digging, but it is a challenging iron and trash infested environment that I would love to see a pro take a crack at. Cheers!
  11. Article you linked mentioned (without a source) a single application; in 1967, by unspecified parties, supposedly in Vietnam. That was the same time the CIA was experimenting with LSD and remote mind control...since we lost that war I'm going to guess this little experiment was a dud as well.
  12. I never bothered to remove the snakes honestly, so this will always be a mystery to me.
  13. Well my advice then would be to become a second son to this guy and then tell him to call up Chevron so he can show them his moves, because he's about to become the richest person on Earth...
  14. Imagine the multimillion dollar a month salary this dude would be making from the petrochemical and mineral industry if this was even remotely possible. These stories are quaint and cute as they tell tales of old traditions, but anyone who thinks they describe an actual phenomenon is getting sold up snake oil river.
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