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Zincoln

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Zincoln last won the day on December 29 2021

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location:
    Oregon
  • Interests:
    MD'ing, golf, camping, hunting, family adventures
  • Gear Used:
    Whites V3i, MX Sport, M6, IDX, TRX . Deus.

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  1. Let me know if you have one you want to part with! If you aren't aware, there will be a V (Or V followed by a number) pressed into the outside of the plastic ear on the coil. Thx, Brian
  2. Back in the 80's, my hometown used to seed the beach with those small school sized milk cartons with .$50 pieces inside of them during the annual festival. They'd bury them in a corded off section of beach, and kids would be turned loose to dig for them. I'm sure not everything was dug up. Over time, the paper would break down and leave the coin behind. Likely they did something similar, or had a 'sawdust pile' type dig in the sand where these were buried for retrieval of the kids. In later years our festival coordinators got smart and started putting denominations on the bottoms of the cartons to be redeemed, rather than burying money in the cartons.
  3. I also came across the refences provided by Steve and others which is a wealth of information...and illustrates the actual rarity of finding meteorites. I'll have it run through a spectrometer at some point in the future and see if the elemental comp is aligned w/ those provided in the links. I did try a refrigerator magnet and it is attracted (I wouldn't call it strong, but it sticks to my specimen). Not getting my hopes up....but its an odd duck. Thx again, Zincoln
  4. I understand GS. Hard to get a really high res photo w/ my equipment. Wish I had lapidary equip to be able to see the fine grain of the specimen. You can easily pick the item up w/ my magnet - it's not going to fall off with an effort to shake it off, but it doesn't slam onto it like a flat bar of steel. Suppose that could be the irregular shape and lack of a nice flat surface to flat surface interface. Or maybe, the reason why it rings up as non-ferrous. This is the first and only time i 'think' i might have a space rock:-) The two things that have me scratching my head: 1. It simply is appears to irregular to be man made. Even if it was the result of an explosion, it still has surfaces that don't add up. Not a single surface is milled, cast or otherwise smooth. 2. It doesn't ring up as ferrous on my detectors (White's and Deus). Rings up just into the non-ferrous range (nickel....gold). For those that detect these things, do you find that they ring up in the positive range vs. a pure iron signal if you have a composite meteorite (nickel-iron)? Next time I get to my precious metals contact I'll have him run it through his spectral analysis machine. Best to all and HH, Zincoln
  5. Skip - see if this does you any good. It is hard. I hit it w/ the bench grinder, then a Dremel w/ a fine grinding bit, and finally tried to polish it a bit.... Appreciate any insight
  6. Those of you that go after meteorites will likely have a much better idea than i. While out metal detecting old west Nevada in the mountain southwest of Caliente, I hit on this target. It's shape is irregular, and it dose appear to have heat smoothing on the surface, particularly on leading edges. It is magnetic (when tested on my rare earth magnet), but not as strong as say a steel bar. Still clings right to the magnet. When I took a file to the surface, i get a nice silver hue (iron nickel?). Hits in the foil/nickel range on my detectors. 43g and the penny is for comparison - quite heavy for its size. Has no appearance of slag or worked metal to me. I find plenty of that along the old railroad sidings. Picture 5 may be the clearest. I do see that there are some meteor strikes North of LV, and not too far from where i was. Any other sure fire tests?
  7. I think a lot of the time its the parents....but different cultures tend to be more or less likely to wear precious metals to school. I know i have several schools in particular that kick out more gold than most.
  8. GB - I dig everything non ferrous in order to ensure I pull gold. I did find quite a few nickels, but not many in the 40's and 50's. Nothing like a 39d or 50d. Pulled close to $15 in clad. I agree on wheat pennies as i generally run 7:1 wheat to silver so this was a very good silver ratio. Looking back, I only pulled a 13d and a 20 in terms of older wheats. Seems that even though there was an active boarding school, the ranks were small until they built up the bigger dorms in the late 20s. Then, they rebuilt in the 50s/60's, and pushed all the dirt around where the original dorms and admin buildings were. I'm quite certain some goodies are a foot deep, and some under asphalt or existing buildings. I hit the old ballfield which was nearby in years past and managed around 10 silvers also, with most being 40's and 50s. I believe this is when the local store was at its peak. Our Oregon dirt really puts a stop to you after about 8-9 inches in terms of any valid VDIs, and beyond that items like dimes typically come in as iron. Don't care what detector or coil you use (though i know the eTrac crowd has had some luck on slightly deeper targets in the parks). Likely we are still registering them....but you'd dig countless nails to pull the occasional small silver. I've always loved it when I've gone somewhere with sweet soil and you suddenly find items at 12 inches - whole different world. I keep hoping for a Barber or IHC, but think after this many hours on the site my odds aren't real good. Best, Zincoln
  9. I found the skeleton key to be kinda funny. It has Washington DC emblazed on it. It's a modern momento. I do find a few from the correct era, but not this one. Class ring is WIP. The school not too far away that i expected it to belong to doesn't have anyone graduating that year that corresponds to the initials. Meaning, it may be from somewhere else in the country. Zincoln
  10. VL - the old school was 5 or 6 hunts....quite a few hours for the silver. Again, better than most any park up here and about as good as most yards I might access. The jewelry was all from one single day hunt at various schools. ZIncoln
  11. April was a fair month for me. I was able to get access to a private boarding school which operated from 1906 until 1988 and sat on 50 acres. While it wouldn't have seen lots of commerce, and while jewelry wasn't part of the environment, I still had high hopes. I know the student body was quite small until the 20s. In the end, I managed 5 silver dimes, 4 war nickels, a buff, and 20+ wheat pennies. Also found quite a lot of clad (and very few zincolns - yeah!). Lots of keys from the old dorms. It was better than most locations I hunt, and I'm sure still has a few more out there. It became clear that when new facilities were built in the 50s and 60s, lots of dirt was moved around an much of the original turf has been buried under a foot or more of fill. You could easily tell original ground from the fill when cutting plugs. At the start of May, I spent one entire day working tot lots in schools I'd ignored since the start of the pandemic. Found several nice gold items, one of which I have hopes of returning. Also found a small mountain of bling and clad. I used a mix of my Deus with the 9" X35 coil and a derivation of the hot program, and my V3i with the 10" DD coil and my custom deep program at the old school. The class ring was found with my MX Sport and 7"DD. It was a very wet April (and now May) out West. Hoping to get some warmth soon! Zincoln
  12. You know GM, with all the shooting they did on their mine site...you should be able to find plenty of spent cartridges and bullets. Seems Sarge and team sprayed some lead and there are likely some concentrated areas. Wasn't he shooting a 30-06 BAR? Other fella had a Thompson if i recall. Good chance they may have old military cartridge markings with year of mfg on the base. If you get the book published, imagine sending along a spent bullet or cartridge case along with every book in say the first 100 or 500...or during signings. I'm sure there have been a lot more rounds spent up there over the years, and no way to know with absolute certainty if what you found tied to the group...but it would be a rather fun way to promote the book and tie real history to it. Metal detectors would easily pick these out if you have a group up there, and they'd be rather shallow in general with the limited growth of plants up there. Food for thought..... Zincoln
  13. A sad day indeed. Somehow I'd had a hunch Whiskey Jack's beverage intake was going to make him the unfortunate miner. What a way to go out. Maybe that dropped cup was full of Whiskey. One can only hope he went out with a sip of his favorite beverage on his lips! Boy, you can't make this story up!!
  14. Been a while since I've commented on the thread GM. What I find so fascinating is that this story occurred in 1936, and not 1880. I have always thought of our country being pretty civilized by the 1900s. Heck, I was born only 34 years after this story. Surprising amount of gunplay going on. Just goes to show that when you have something of value, and wide open spaces with little law enforcement, you have a recipe for conflict. The fact that the Great Depression had just ended likely also added some fuel to the fire. Thx again for your generous sharing and daily updates! This is no small time commitment you've provided us all with! Brian
  15. Glad it went well for you Ghostminer. You are a trooper typing out an entry today with an eye patch!! Brian
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