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  1. Version KBA 04-1 2010

    107 downloads

    Metal Detecting Terminology (Minelab) 2010 Knowledge Base Article KBA 04-1, 1.65 MB pdf file, 17 pages Metal detecting terminology and definitions, with an emphasis on Minelab technology wording and descriptions. Minelab Metal Detector Forum
  2. Version by Bruce Candy, Minelab

    257 downloads

    Metal Detector Basics And Theory by Bruce Candy, Minelab 1.42 MB pdf file, 24 pages Bruce is a co-founder of Minelab and the man behind their most advanced designs. This information delves into much greater detail than the above link and has many more illustrations and diagrams. Minelab Metal Detector Forum
  3. Version by Dave Johnson, First Texas

    210 downloads

    Gold Prospecting With A VLF Metal Detector by Dave Johnson, First Texas 10 Mar 2010 Edition, 2.93 MB pdf file, 56 pages Dave is the Chief Designer for First Texas Products and has been involved in designing most of the VLF gold prospecting detectors sold over the last 30 years. This is an excellent primer on using VLF detectors to prospect for gold. First Texas (Bounty Hunter, Fisher, Teknetics) Forum
  4. Version by Thomas Dankowski, Fisher Labs

    112 downloads

    Fisher Intelligence - Advancing the Hobby of Metal Detecting by Thomas J. Dankowski, Fisher Labs 5th Edition 04/2006, 6 MB pdf file, 48 pages Thought provoking articles on aspects of metal detecting not often talked about. First Texas (Fisher) Forum
  5. Version FRL870295A 3rd Ed 1993

    150 downloads

    Advanced Nugget Hunting With the Fisher Gold Bug Metal Detector by Pieter Heydelaar & Dave Johnson, Fisher Labs 3rd Printing Jan 1993, 2.36 MB pdf file, 46 pages This out-of-print book is a good basic text on gold nugget detecting. Although it uses the original Fisher Gold Bug as an example the information applies to most nugget detectors. Part 2 by David Johnson is an excellent primer on hot rocks. First Texas (Fisher) Forum
  6. Version 2010

    33 downloads

    Tesoro 2010 Metal Detector Information #22, 2.61 MB pdf file, 64 pages This detector catalog and field reviews is packed full of extra information that will be of interest to anybody who has or is thinking of getting a metal detector. Lots of good answers to basic questions. Tesoro Metal Detector Forum
  7. Can someone explain to me what makes this new Anfibio different from a X TERRA 705 the 705 can run three different frequencies all be it you have to change coils to be able to run any of the three different frequencies it can run the Anfibio you push a button to change frequencies but with that being said I also know I can purchase a coil from a manufacturer that pretty much allows me to run one coil on the 705 and just by turning the 705 off and back on in a short time period it changes to one of the different frequencies that the 705 can run in in other words one single coil will run 3 KHz,7.5 KHz,and 18.75 KHz all done with just one coil so can someone please explain how the Anfibio is any different from the X TERRA 705 and not trying to start a bashing war here just trying to understand how the Anfibio is much different from the 705.
  8. I was just wondering if you had the opportunity to test a new detector before it came on the market would you be willing to do it ? Most of the time it’s given to people you could say that their name is in lights . We have so many people that has been swinging a detector for years that are more qualified than the so call star . Let me hear your view point on this subject . If you ever have the pleasure or opportunity to do it in the pass let us hear that too . Chuck
  9. This is something that has me a little perplexed, especially when a whole raft of opposition detectors from abroad are offering such an option on their detector platforms. How easy would it be to improve current popular models like the F75, AT Pro, etc with additional frequencies to make some US made detectors a more attractive proposition, or are we talking about the requirement for a completely new platform for this to happen ( too much cost for not enough return)? If just worries me when we see little or no response at all on trying to compete on the selectable frequency front. Some may say the market is already flooded with such detectors, though if you do not offer up an alternative to just single frequency VLF's, then customers may look elsewhere for detector platforms offering more flexibility/features for the money. Some of the selectable frequency detectors made abroad: Minelab Equinox (plus multi) Minelab 705 (coil change for different frequencies) Rutus Alter71 XP Deus/Orx Makro Kruzer Multi Nokta Impact Nokta Anfibio multi ...and many other lesser known Euro manufacturers with at least dual frequencies. It is evident that there are two distinct lines of thinking when it comes to producing a detector, either make one that has the capability of covering all or most fields of detecting (ie. prospecting, relic hunting, coin shooting, beach detecting), or produce several detectors, each with a specific purpose. The obvious downside is the sheer cost of owning a whole raft of detectors for specific purposes, something that used to be common place, though now not such an issue with the advent of very capable multi-use detectors suitable for low conductors right through to sub gram gold. Will be interested to see other views on the subject, have we seen the end of single use or specialist detectors, and whether multi-role/multi or selectable frequency detectors will rule going forward.
  10. This coming new year provides an interesting contrast between two companies who’s fortune rests on technology. One company quite established that has either by choice or constraint had a rather stagnant new technology history. The other a new startup that feels that it has a new technology. And is entering the marketplace at a price point that would be considered by most as a Flagship statement model. While the Minelab Equinox has pressured the lowering of prices for some competitors, Tarsacci has demonstrated the confidence to offer a product at close to double the price of the Equinox’s. If Tarsacci were a new company with limited experience in metal detector design and manufacturing, then success might be more tenuous. However the principal engineer has a strong background for the task at hand. On the other hand if Tesoro had the engineering horsepower then I would place my bets on them, as standing up a new company is usually riskier than re-invigorating a known entity. I’m really sad to say that Tesoro evokes a woulda, coulda, shoulda of Technology from me. Tarsacci MDT 8000 Data & Reviews
  11. It is so many single frequency detectors out there and yes some do have more you can access. It really don’t make any difference it’s still one frequency at a time. What I can’t understand is more are being made and if not on the market already like we’ve seen this year . It will be another nugget and coin detector should be out by the end of November. Oh it’s telling how many frequency you can hunt in but still one at a time. I know I sound like a broken record saying one at a time but that’s the truth of the matter. When Minelab came out with the Equinox they raised the bar at a higher level that others have yet to reach . This is what all of the other detector companies have to strive for . If they can just equal the Equinox will keep them in the running. I don’t see Minelab just sitting back without looking at the Equinox saying how can we make it better. I myself is swinging a single frequency detector and I do like it . I’m not saying they don’t have a place in the detector market but over time will be less and less . I’ve owned a Equinox 800 and I loved it but had it with the wait on a small coil so I sold it. If some others don’t come out with something to equal it in early 2019 I’ll get me another Nox . Chuck
  12. Hey guys, do the ground balance numbers indicate mineralization? And if so how do the numbers correlate.
  13. For some reason I have never turned on my machines in the house, i always go out in the field, or for VLFs the yard, and turned on there to learn. I was curious if you turned on your machines like the Zed, PIs and VLFs inside, would it hurt the electroincs? Especially if its constanly overloading or going off on all the crazy EMI. I just want to turn on to play with the settings and practice more with the buttons, etc.. Not actually detect. Funny been detecting now for 5 years and never bothered to ask or try
  14. For me to want wireless coils the cost needs to come down lots . If I can keep buying wired coils for about a third of the cost of wireless ones that alone is enough as far as I’m concerned. Wireless headphones is something I don’t leave home without it and it’s something all can afford. Chuck
  15. I always have my ears perked up for something new in metal detectors and metal detecting technology. I’m not educated enough to really get deep into the technical side of it, but I have a general layman's knowledge of the subject. A couple years ago Carl Moreland, the Engineering Manager for White's Electronics, was interviewed on a radio show. I tripped over a reference to the interview on another forum and checked it out. It is very long, and near the end Carl dropped a bombshell. At least I thought so, but it went unnoticed and uncommented on in the metal detecting online world. I thought about posting it on a forum back then but decided to wait and see what developed. Here is the applicable portion of the interview: Relic Roundup Radio Show, January 17, 2012, Interview with Carl Moreland, Engineering Manager, White’s Electronics http://en.1000mikes.com/app/archiveEntry.xhtml?archiveEntryId=260469 Transcript beginning at 50:57 mark: Carl Moreland - “I can mention one technology that we’re working on because the patent has already been published… or the application, not the patent hasn't gone through yet. We’re working on something called half sine technology, which has actually been around since the 1960’s in geophysical prospecting applications. This is where instead of transmitting a sinusoidal signal you actually just transmit half of the sine and you can do that at extremely high voltages and high ? rates and so on. It’s technically not pulse induction but it’s not VLF either and it is a time domain method. And with that we can get really good depth and we can even get target id information and do discrimination and so forth.” Can you see why I perked up at that? I am still amazed it did not get any notice at the time. Nothing happened for a long time. Then I got this PM from Rick Kempf recently: Sent 29 January 2014 - 09:04 AM Was looking for info on my new SD 2100 this AM when I sort of fell down a rabbit hole of old forum posts and emerged reading Whites new patent. About the first thing I noticed was that you were cited in "prior art". Here's what they cited: http://www.voy.com/76600/7/475.html The patent is here: http://www.google.com/patents/US20110316541 Is this something you knew about? Just wondering. Rick Kempf I told Rick, yeah, heard about that. It was the patent finally being granted from the application Carl mentions in the interview. It was fun getting a mention in a patent though I think it was just the examiner studying up on the subject and finding my old post helpful in simplifying the subject. For a long time the Holy Grail in metal detecting has been something that combines the target identification of an Induction Balance (IB or more commonly known as VLF) detector with depth of a Pulse Induction (PI) detector. There have been many promises and false starts over the years, and that was one reason I kept the radio interview mention quiet the last couple years. Frankly, I had half forgot about it until Rick brought the patent being granted to my attention. Notice the title: Hybrid Induction Balance/Pulse Induction Metal Detector A new hybrid metal detector combines induction balance and pulse induction technologies. Target signals are generated from a transmitted wave that has both induction balance and pulse current inducing characteristics and uses pertinent sampling of the receive data. Combining the two data sources provides eddy current target identification while excluding ground permeability and remanence obscuration. Is it time to sing Hallelujah? Well, there is a big gap in between getting a patent and bringing a detector to market. Many patents get filed and you never even see something directly related to the patent. Maybe it looked good on paper but does not pan out well in reality for numerous reasons. So just because White's was granted this patent does not mean something is around the corner. However, they have been working on it for over two years already obviously. And it has been some time since White's put something new out. I do not count remakes of the MXT etc as new. So I think there is reason to be hopeful we may see something one of these days. John Earle is one of the unsung heros in the industry. He had a hand in many of the best products at Compass Electronics before moving over to White's after Compass went under. To this day I have never used a VLF that goes any deeper than my old Compass Gold Scanner Pro. John was one of the brains involved in that, as well as the White's Goldmaster 3, regarded by many as being the pinnacle of the analog development of that model line. I was fortunate to have met John at the factory some years ago. He is listed as the inventor on the new patent. Half sine technology is also mentioned in an earlier patent filed by White's, again with John listed as inventor at http://www.freepatentsonline.com/7649356.pdf Looks like serious stuff brewing. Bruce Candy of Minelab makes mention of half sine technology in a patent application at http://patents.com/us-20130154649.html which makes me wonder about the new "Super Gold Detector" he is working on. But it is this most recent patent by White's that seems to put the finest point on it. Maybe the Holy Grail of detecting is soon to be a reality. The fact it is White's certainly gives me more hope than what we have seen in the past. Edit May 2015 - see also White's patent for Constant Current Metal Detector
  16. Today I tried something different, trying to cherry pick only deep high tones. Had the 6 inch coil on my 800, very trashy small 100+ year old park. Set it on Park 1, noise cancel, manual GB, 5 tones with the first 3 segments set to 0 volume 1 tone the last 2 were both set to max volume and tone, set the recovery speed at 5 and 0 iron bias. My question to those that know is, am I losing depth with this kind of setting? It seemed to work well, I have been trying to figure out how to park hunt deep silver,.All the pieces in the image were only giving tone, no numbers and were all carrot deep. Suggestions?
  17. Not saying all but most comparison is between the Equinox and whatever they want to show off. I’ve seen this video between the Equinox and the New Anfibio before. The funny thing is he put the Anfibio in deep mode to do the testing . Is someone telling me I got to put the Anfibio in this mode to get the most depth. My thinking is when I turn a detector on and set the sensitivity as high as I can get it to run that’s as deep it’s going. I guess with it I hunt this field with the regular settings then go back and hunt it in the deep mode. I say Bull Sh-t ! Have you notice that most never say what the ID is showing. I’d like to see and I’m sure some are out there testing against their own detectors. I guess over in the U.K. maybe you want to hear a fair to good tone at fifteen inches. Just maybe the ID is not important to you but to me it is . Give me a detector that shows a good ID at 6 to 10” and that’s all I’ll ask for . If beyond that it don’t give me a ID then it’s up to me to dig are not. I did like the tone when it detected something . On hearing some others it was like scratching on a black board . So many times the person doing the testing never had a Equinox in their hands before. I could take and nail a coffee can lid on to a broom handle to make the other something less if the need be . Chuck PS Why don’t you just let your detector stand on it’s own.
  18. High Frequency Gold Nugget Detector Roundup Our cup runneth over! Just a few years ago the market for "over 30 kHz nugget detectors" was quite limited. For a long time there were only a few options: Fisher Gold Bug 2 (71 kHz) $764 with one coil Minelab Eureka Gold (6.4, 20, & 60 kHz) Discontinued $1049 when new with one coil White's GMZ (50 kHz) Discontinued $499 when new with one coil White's GMT (48 khz) $729 with one coil Things were that way for over a decade. Then in 2015 Makro introduced the Gold Racer (56 kHz) $599 with one coil. Sister company Nokta released the AU Gold Finder (56 kHz) $799 with two coils Then in 2017 we see the Minelab Gold Monster 1000 (45 khz) at $799 with two coils. And although not a dedicated nugget detector, the Deus high frequency coil options (up to 80 kHz) were also released, $1520 for complete detector with one HF coil. Now in 2018 we get another general purpose machine, the Equinox 800, that can hit 40 khz, $899 with one coil. And just announced... the Makro Gold Kruzer (61 kHz) $749 with two coils and the White's Goldmaster 24K (48 khz) $729 with one coil These last two announcements have made barely a ripple in the prospecting world, or at least going by other forums that seems to be the case. There are various reason for that (forums not being prospecting oriented or being Minelab centric) but still the lack of buzz is interesting. I do believe people are both burned out by all the new introductions and that the market is saturated with high frequency models. Leaving out the general purpose machines to sum up the current options it looks like the current "sweet spot" for pricing is a high frequency model at $749 with two coils. The Gold Bug 2 saw a price reduction to $699. Makro Gold Racer 56 kHz - $599 one coil Fisher Gold Bug 2 71 kHz - $699 one coil White's Goldmaster 24K 48 kHz - $729 one coil White's GMT 48 khz - $729 one coil Makro Gold Kruzer 61 kHz - $749 two coils Minelab Gold Monster 1000 45 kHz - $799 two coils Nokta AU Gold Finder 56 kHz - $799 two coils Added 1/2019 XP ORX up to 81 kHz - $899 one coil High frequency nugget detectors compared White's Goldmaster 24K, Minelab Equinox 800, Gold Monster 1000, Makro Gold Kruzer Minelab Gold Monster, Fisher Gold Bug 2, Makro Gold Racer, Nokta Impact
  19. When I saw a video showing the Makro Gold Racer recovery speed using two nails and a gold ring, it caused me to reflect on the various internet nail tests. Nearly all employ modern round nails, when these items rarely present issues. The common VDI (visual discrimination scale) puts ferrous items at the low end of the scale, and items with progressively increasing conductivity higher on the scale. The problem is the size of items also matters. Small gold is low on the scale, and the larger the gold, the higher it reads on the scale. A silver quarter reads higher than a silver dime, etc. All manner of ferrous trash including medium and smaller nails fall where they should when using discrimination and are easily tuned out. The problem is large iron and steel items, and ferrous but non-magnetic materials like stainless steel. Steel plates, large bolts, broken large square nails, axe heads, hammer heads, broken pry bar and pick tips, etc. all tend to read as high conductive targets. Usually it is just the sheer size pushing it higher up the scale. Detectors also love things with holes, which makes for a perfect target by enabling and enhancing near perfect eddy currents, making items appear larger than they really are. Steel washers and nuts are a big problem in this regard, often reading as non-ferrous targets. Oddball shapes cause problems, particularly in flat sheet steel. Old rusted cans often separate into irregular shaped flat pieces, and roofing tin (plated steel) and other sheet steel items are my number one nemesis around old camp sites. Bottle caps present a similar issue in modern areas. These items produce complex "sparky" eddy currents with both ferrous and non-ferrous indications. Many thin flat steel items produce remarkably good gold nugget type signals in old camp areas. Two general tips. Concentric coils often handle ferrous trash better than DD coils. A DD coil is often the culprit when dealing with bottle caps where a concentric coil often makes them easy to identify. Another thing is to use full tones. Many ferrous items are producing both ferrous and non-ferrous tones. Blocking ferrous tones allows only the non-ferrous tone to be heard, giving a clear "dig me" signal. This was the real bane of single tone machines with a simple disc knob to eliminate ferrous objects. You still heard the non-ferrous portion of the signal. Multi tones allows you to hear the dual ferrous/non-ferrous reports from these troublesome items, helping eliminate most of them. Certain detectors can also show multiple target responses on screen at once, like the White's models featuring the SignaGraph (XLT, DFX, etc.) and CTX with target trace. These displays show target "smearing" that stands out differently from the clean VDI responses produced by most good items. A machine with a simple VDI numeric readout can only show you one number at a time and the only indication you might get is "dancing" numbers that refuse to lock on. Usually though the predominate response overrides and fakes you out. This is where a good high end visual display capable of putting all VDI response on screen simultaneously can really help out. I have been collecting these odd iron and steel items to practice with and to help me evaluate which machines might do best in ferrous trash. The main thing I wanted to note here is contrived internet videos with common round nails often present a misleading picture. Many machines do very well on nails yet fail miserably on flat steel. Steel Trash Testing
  20. I myself haven’t had the opportunity to truly answer this question but maybe some of you can . Chuck
  21. We see new detectors on the market that offer to run in one frequency at a time. They have several to offer like the new XP ORX. In my opinion I think they can come back at a later day and have a update that could give you a multi frequency to run at one time like the Nox. Back in time it was turn on and go but as we all know today that don’t hold true anymore. That detector has a brain that we can access and I say if I set it up before for a change then I can come later to make that change. I want your opinion so lay it on me . Chuck
  22. The big thing one detector company open up in 2018 is a milt frequency. You can pick one at a time are all numbers at one time. I believe that all other detector companies has to make this their goal too . I know this is putting the cart before the horse but what frequency numbers do you want to see in the new White’s in 2019 ? I myself want it more for coin hunting. I still would like to see some high numbers. I want it for small gold if I find myself on a beach are in the gold fields . Yes I do want to pick what I want to hunt in be one are all . I hope someone from White’s will chime in just to say they haven’t forgot about us faithful ones . Chuck
  23. I wonder if Minelab will build a dedicated nugget detector in the style of the equinox, but with gpz type technology. This seems to be the way the CZX by Fisher is headed. I think the Equinox will open up many more machines in the same style eventually. I would hope for concentric and dd coils and more power in a lightweight dedicated nugget hunting package.
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