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  1. Since I'm down and out with a broken ankle for a few weeks and have plenty of time on my hands. I decided to do a EX2 chest mount mod that I saw on You-Tube by IDX Monster, thank you sir for paving the way!! I have a bum shoulder that needs to be rebuilt next year, I needed to adapt my machine to extend my hunting time until then. I used a Teknetics S-rod for the stock 11" coil and a White's MX5 S-rod for the 8" coil. I'll be using a Go-Pro chesty to mount the control head and I bought a 3' extension cable to connect the control to the coil. I cut the battery housing from the handle, but, I have a more compact and lighter battery pack on the way. I ordered a 1/4" stereo headphone jack from Amazon and will run my phone cord under my shirt to keep it from getting in the way. This set-up is as light as feather to swing and I can't wait to heal up and take it on it's maiden voyage.
  2. I consider myself to be extremely fortunate due to the fact that the entire age of modern metal detecting has taken place over the course of my lifetime. I was too young in the 60's to be one of the many famous names that were there first on the ground with these new toys that go beep. That's good though for me as most of them are gone now and I'm still here. I got my first detector at the true dawn of the modern detecting age when I got my White's Coinmaster 4 in 1972. It was one of the first of the new "TR" machines that were the starting point for what most of us use today. Mine was as basic as a detector gets, no ground balance existed yet or discrimination. Just a couple inches depth and a beep, dig it up. So I have been involved in detecting now for 47 years. I started my business while in high school in 1976, and have been involved in metal detecting pretty much daily ever since. Anyone who followed my online presence starting in 1998 may see a pattern. I have been involved in some top end machines, some VLF, but basically almost every ground balancing PI made has been in my hands at some point. I had a vision in my mind based on my background in computers that told me what was possible and where we were headed. I was particularly incensed when an upstart company from Australia showed up the industry leaders at the time with the world's most powerful gold detecting PI machines. All the more so when I heard White's had a shot at it and passed. I made it my mission to jump on and foster anything that came along that might compete, and so I was involved with the Garrett Infinium, the first U.S. ground balancing PI. I had a lot to do with White's finally producing the TDI. Yet the fact is nobody ever seriously took Minelab on, and finally they won me over because they delivered when the rest just milked us. Minelab has been the sole company at the forefront of this technology since the SD2000 was introduced. All this time I have wanted two things. A vision in my mind of what a VLF could be. And a similar vision regarding a PI. Both those visions basically revolved around something a normal person could use both as regards ergonomics and price, two areas we kept getting bent over on for 20 years. Long story short I am grateful to Minelab for allowing me to be involved in the machine that delivered on my first vision. The Minelab Equinox is the first machine ever that really can do any VLF metal detecting task and do it well. In any one area it may not be "the best" but no one machine delivers across the board like the Equinox. My VLF quest is over. I will use an Equinox as my primary unit until a detector comes along, probably a Minelab, that does what it does but better. No more VLF buy and try for me. Yay! In 2017 I laid out my vision for the PI I wanted. The price was kind of a set the bar high (with a low price) thing so there is a little wiggle room there. But not a lot... the machine price should be something most people can stomach. As far as I am concerned the GPX 4500 sets the standard at $2699 both for performance and price. The TDI wins on ergonomics but loses too much in performance for me. All I really wanted was a GPX performance in an ergonomic package, and we all know it can be done. That is what is so frustrating. It's one thing to introduce new tech but all I want is proven tech packaged right. Garrett has really been a disappointment not putting the ATX in a light box. They can do it but so far have refused. I would have been satisfied with that. Right now I am calling the Australian made QED as being the default winner of my challenge. The rough edges have been smoothed out, and it's got the ergonomics, coil selection, and price all right. I am not going to argue with anyone over performance. Based on what I know it's good enough for me to go find gold and easily beats the TDI and is competitive with GPX. Good enough for me and good job boys. The only niggle is no FCC approval for U.S. sales, no U.S. dealers or service. But by end of 2020 if there is nothing better I will have one anyway. But we have the Fisher Impulse AQ on the verge and a dry land prospecting version promised. I would be crazy not to wait and see what develops there. I sold my GPZ for many reasons, mostly because I was not going to be detecting much this year, but I resolved when I sold it I would wait until my vision appeared. I knew it was close. I decided I can have fun enough with Equinox until that happens. Put as simply as possible I want a reasonably powerful PI packaged like a good VLF that most of us can afford. Something that can get in and out of a small backpack with an hour of labor being involved. So I am tossing down the gauntlet. I have my magic VLF and am looking for a mate for it. Right now QED and Impulse are in the running. And it's up to Minelab, Nokta/Makro, and sure, let's toss Garrett and White's in there also. It's time to deliver as by the end of 2020 I am getting one. I prefer in the spring but if something is one the radar I may wait. By 2021 I will be using something that finally fulfills what this high school kid from Alaska has known would happen someday. And I got to be there and see it all from start to finish. As I said... a very fortunate soul! Interfacion QED PL2 Fisher Impulse AQ
  3. Forget VLF and PI: here comes the BastardXWave! Fully utilizing the latest XWave technology the BastardXWave detector punches far deeper than any other detector ever invented in the long history of detector prospecting, both on land and sea (it’s submersible to -801 metres). With this detector there is absolutely no need to dig for anything except your favourite metals, coins, jewellery or relics. Its vastly superior XWave detecting technology ignores all crap, including bottle tops, aluminium foil, nails or lead sinkers/birdshot (and everything else you don’t want to dig). It’s as easy as flipping the dial to the ‘IGNORE ALL CRAP’ mode and the BastardXWave does the rest. In the IAC mode the user has a ‘Voice Assist’ option where a very seductive female voice suggests you dig a bit further to the left or right to hit the hot spot. Obviously, by dialling the ‘DIG ALL CRAP’ mode you’ll be digging crap all day long. Although any serious detector prospector will scoff at the DAC mode, it does keep newbies and kiddies entertained for days (if not weeks). Once you’ve flipped to the desired mode, you’ll need to tell the BastardXWave what it is you’re looking for. If you only want to find gold just push the ‘FIND GOLD YOU BASTARD’ button in the IAC mode. In the FGYB setting the BastardXWave will immediately find gold no matter how tiny or deep in the hottest ground, just wave the detector in the general direction of the area you want to search (you don’t even have to leave your car, just make sure you wind down the windows). You can rest assured that in the FGYB setting all you’ll be digging for is gold, in fact you’ll find so much of the yellow stuff that you’ll be able to pay someone else to do the digging for you. It’s the same for all other metals (such as silver, copper, lead or zinc), just hit the right button whilst in the IAC mode and become an instant billionaire! If you have the urge to find only alloys, just hit the ‘FIND ALLOYS YOU BASTARD’ button in the IAC mode and the BastardXWave will hone in on any alloy humankind and aliens have ever created. Here the ‘Voice Assist’ girl tells relic hunters whether they are digging for an ancient pewter goblet or a wrought iron spoon. In fact, the seductive voice easily identifies the age the relic was created, for example during the Victorian Age or even the Bronze or Iron Ages (if some hunter-gatherer smelted it, the BastardXWave will find it!). Besides analysing age and metal combinations, the detector also shows the condition and current market value of any relic it has spotted, this is of great value in deciding if your lackey digs or not. To find any coins of any country no matter how old just push the ‘FIND COINS YOU BASTARD’ button in the IAC mode and away you go. Just walk around any public place (parks, sporting grounds, beaches etc.) with the FCYB setting turned on and the BastardXWave will alert you to the nearest coins in the vicinity, no matter how deep or how salty or hot the ground. This handy feature means there is no need to swing the detector until it plays ‘We’re in the money’ (a very appropriate ditty by the ‘Gold Diggers'). Likewise, simply pushing the ‘FIND JEWELRY YOU BASTARD’ button does the same thing for any piece of jewellery you can think of. In the FJYB setting the detector will play George Jones and Tammy Wynette’s ‘Golden Ring’ before you need to start swinging. The BastardXWave is also extremely sensitive to diamonds and other high-value gemstones; in the ‘FIND GEMS YOU BASTARD’ setting it’ll play Marilyn Monroe’s ‘Diamonds are a girl's best friend’ as soon as it shoots your latest stone-clad crown. Finding rare earth metals (including cerium, dysprosium, erbium, europium, gadolinium, holmium, lanthanum, lutetium, neodymium, praseodymium, promethium, samarium, scandium, terbium, thulium, ytterbium or yttrium) is also simplicity itself. Just flip the dial to IAC mode and hit the ‘FIND RARE EARTHS YOU BASTARD’ button. This will promptly find all of the rare earth metal thus far discovered (and even those that haven’t) down to extreme depths very close to the Earth’s core (some might be a bit too deep to dig). As with all the other settings, the FREYB setting can be tuned to the maximum depth you feel like digging; for example, your average detector prospector will be very happy with the 1-5 metres range whilst global mining companies use the BastardXWave to find tiny deposits of rare earth metals several kilometres deep. Likewise, finding meteorites of any size or composition is as easy as pushing the ‘FIND METEORITES YOU BASTARD’ button whilst in the IAC mode. This will instantly link the detector to satellites which beam down the latest lat/long coordinates of impact zones near you and pinpoint the nearest fragments. The BastardXWave also accurately predicts where and when the next meteorite strike will occur; another very handy feature which besides finding meteorites also allows you to take cover at just the right time. The BastardXWave’s manufacturer is currently working on ‘ERADICATE POVERTY’ and ‘STOP CLIMATE CHANGE’ settings. These awesome new settings will be available in latter models (including the BastardXWave Pro, BastardXWave Lite and BastardXWave Drone). Disclaimer: Due to deep fears of Chinese industrial espionage, the manufacturer will never release any photographs or technical information on how the BastardXWave works. None the less, you can still order one by privately contacting the manufacturer to haggle a fair price. The manufacturer will only sell the BastardXWaves on the condition that the buyer promises not to brag too much about how much money they’re making from this detector. Because the BastardXWave is so undeniably unique, the manufacturer regrets that there will be no refund after it’s been mailed to the buyer. Nor is there any form of warranty or spare parts. Just one left! Buy it now before it’s sold out!
  4. Book Excerpt: 14/ Modulation Modulated audio acts to reduce noise and response irregularity in a high gain audio platform. That’s a lot to manage. Modulation defines each tone and makes all signals sound better and more the same. This also represents an artificial, distorting influence--a kind of audio “no-man’s-land”where small objects sound bigger and large targets are “clipped down.” This is especially true in the “tone ID” modes. For the operator, modulation makes it harder to tell a deep faint response from a small surface one. In conjunction with Gain, modulation makes small responses more distracting--sounding fuller and more solid. Modulation also makes tiny mineral, seabed or black sand variations jump way up to sound more like good signals. Determining a response’s shape and distance from the coil are also harder. What you have is a digital representation of ground and targets--more of a measure of the relative differences between the two than an actual metal object reading. Another consequence of this is that big targets sound smaller--cans--sunglasses--all are modulated to often sound like they are (more) coin or jewelry-sized. I’ve had some particularly frustrating deep-water hunts with the Equinox giving tantalizing small indications on what turned out to be super-deep “rotten glasses.” This operating characteristic can be confusing for new hunters. This, in particular is an Equinox operating characteristic that is easier to make sense of and manage with some solid, basic instruction. For anyone--the “trade-offs” that derive from the Equinox’s heavily modulated signal are its most frustrating feature. 1/ The first, most basic method of managing a heavily modulated signal is to turn the volume down. Even going to “24” or “23” makes a huge difference. This makes for more audio distinction between weak and strong signals. Many CTX hunters discovered this after becoming frustrated with that detector’s tendency to bring up tiny conductors. With its high frequency weighting on several of the pre-set modes this is more so of the Equinox. While many of the underwater headphones that are available are quiet to begin with and don’t allow much of a margin for reduced volume--the stock 800 series wireless set do. 2/ Focus upon the more solid signals. This is a critical Equinox skill in any context. Even as a pulse hunter who has experience with fast Delay machines that hit running shoe eyelets loud and clear--the Equinox was initially exasperating to use for me because of these modulation-boosted targets. While I see some patient hunters getting good results “micro gold” hunting this is at highly specific types of locations. The solution is simple basics. Rather than digging endless tiny part-responses--use Pinpoint to check for solidity--and do a quick angled pass to see the consistency. (See “Pinpoint” below). With practice these small conductors will become more obvious in Discriminate as well. This is the way to offset the distortion of a modulated signal--but still get its benefits. This is where the above mentioned “correlation” comes in--looking for “sets” of target characteristics to double check what the audio is telling you. Even when examining tiny “earring-sized” sounds it’s possible to screen for solid targets and use this as a basis for gathering a full target profile. Each signal feature (size, strength, solidity, position in strata…) should confirm the others. The depth meter is also a good tool for offsetting the distortion of modulated audio. Signal depth and signal strength should be “in keeping.” (More on this type of method below). Modulation is more active in the Tone (break) ID modes (especially “5 Tone)” so using the more fluid “50 Tone” or just “Pinpoint” are good ways to compensate. One reason that many hunters have trouble adjusting to the Equinox is that again, this high Gain / high frequency / modulation combination reduces your ability to judge how far from the coil something is. This in turn throws off your sizing. The number of hunters I see on “YouTube” videos trying to ignore these simple target testing basics is laughable--with many trying to pass off this as some cool “dig everything” ethos. Again--not “everything” is “anything” and a machine like the Equinox will tell you when not to dig sometimes--loud and clear. From "Skill Building with the Minelab Equinox Series Metal Detectors" by Clive James Clynick (2019)
  5. I noticed a lot of the older threads had lost their attached "tags", probably due to an update somewhere along the way. I've been spending hours today working from the oldest threads forward retagging everything and also moving some threads to other more appropriate forums. Seems to be mostly 2016 and before stuff. Whatever, housekeeping. It has been interesting in seeing the large number of "gold found" threads created back in the 2015 - 2016 time frame especially. We had the double whammy of the SDC 2300 followed by the GPZ 7000. Both machines are good at finding gold missed by the earlier Minelab PI models. This created a mini gold rush in two ways. First, the machines actually do target gold the other models were weak on so they did find gold the others could not. But a large portion of it was simply new machines giving people confidence to go back and hunt old areas once again. Often there is knowledge from prior hunting that allows a focus on where the gold is known to be. Gold was also therefore found the earlier machines could have found but that was simply missed by earlier hunters. Well, four years on now and things have slowed down a lot. It's mostly the old die-hards still at it, but lots of people that were active back in 2015 have gone quiet. I'm sure I know why. There were many old "dead" patches I hit with the GPZ 7000 that came alive again. The problem now is it is back to eking out smaller and smaller returns for time spent. The sad fact is there is only so much readily available ground out there and we are once again hitting that depleted stage with existing technology. This can't go on forever as every nugget found is one less to find and they are not growing back. We need a new toy soon or things are going to get pretty quiet. Compared to 2015 they already are. We've seen this story many times before going back to when Minelab PI took over from VLF, and gold VLF machines taking over from the coin detectors prior to that. Forum threads tagged "gold found"
  6. As much as I enjoy using the gm1000, especially in the auto modes, I can see how a Gold Monster PI machine would be popular. Grab and go, auto modes, under 5 lbs. Sounds great to me???
  7. Perhaps of interest, a place to collect info of detectors from our past and their modifications. There were a few homegrown detectors about in the 80`s in OZ, their manufacturers no longer operating, perhaps also were others throughout the world, these were "the building blocks" of the sophisticated machines we use now. Some like the Goldseekers 12000 which lead to ML, and another that enjoyed some popularity was the Bridgewright. This photo is of a Bounty Hunter RB10 that has a added pot on the front near coil plug, I believe this modification may have come from not yet ML technicians back around 83-84, unfortunately I`ve lost the operator instructions which had a extra page explaining the use of this pot in GBing the detector.
  8. My brother knows I'm trying to build my own machine and sent me this diagram. Thought it was pretty funny 🙂
  9. An add for the lack of experience, wisdom, or judgement prospector. MWF Gold Radar Long Range Metal Detector - Professional Gold Finder and Deep Seeking Geolocation Tracker - Premium Treasure Hunting by MWF Metal Detectors EXPLORE ANYWHERE: High end professional metal detector that gives you the power to search over multiple terrains. Using superior geolocation technology detect far more then before with the dual functions deep seeking and long-range target locating. GOLD FINDER: Unmatched in gold hunting capability! This detector is designed to accurately locate everything made of gold, like coins & jewelry to older relics and larger treasures. The ability of the Long Range Gold Line is 50 meters deep and 100 meters distance. IONIAN AND RADAR DETECTION SYSTEM: High quality and accurate performance, product manufacturing with the best electronic components and circuits up to international standards. works on a built radar detection system, to detecting and searching for radioactive ionization of the gold buried underground. MANUFACTURER WARRANTY: Guaranteed manufacturer’s warranty on all products. Detector Power is also proud to offer a hassle-free 15-day return policy. NOTICE - Bank authorization may be necessary prior to purchase to prevent order cancellation. Please confirm with bank prior to purchase to avoid order delays. New (1) from $6,999.00 Professional Gold Finders only 🤩.
  10. Hi all If I'm using a vlf/lf that is over 40khz, is there any benefit to getting a 2nd machine that runs under 40 kHz when prospecting? Assume PI is not possible at the moment. Does a sub 40 bring anything special to the table? I'm a beginner so just curious Thanks
  11. I was reading the Australian Electronic Gold Prospecting Forum today and noticed a post about detector depth. I was wondering what others think about today's detectors compared to what was available 25 years ago. I read somewhere that (Woody) the guy that does mods to detectors thinks that for outright depth the sd2000 still goes the deepest. I wouldn't know as I've never owned a sd2000 or a gpz7000. Anyway, i found the comments at AEGPF interesting and wonder if anyone here has actually done a depth comparison between the zed and sd2000. Heres the snippet from AEGPF Quote from AEGPF: "The deepest Pi detector ever developed in my opinion was a prototype SD2000 that BC modified for the late Jim Stewart.BC slowed down the clock speed to give a very long pulse and made some other unknown changes to the circuit to cope with higher currents etc. At the time the SD2000 came out BC stated that it was at about 95% of the maximum potential depth that any handheld PI could ever achieve (and still pass emission standards). However, the deepest PI that has ever been made for gold was Corybns detector which detected a nugget of around 10oz? at 3 feet in depth in WA. Somewhere on the forum is a reference to it and I will try and find the link when I have time. "What is interesting is that the deepest nuggets ever detected by a Pi was by a detector used in the early 1980's in WA-Corbyn's wheeled detector! Pictures of it and the depths of some of nuggets he found with it can be seen in Mike Wattones book: Quest for gold.NO Pi detector today could match the depths Corby got on at least one nugget! (4cm nugget at over 36" in mineralized ground)"
  12. Not sure this is a topic for this forum, but this is where I see a large number of technically adept folks posting so I'm going to try (also the folks who are talking about x-coils on another forum). Has anyone had detecting experience around these 5G installations being rushed out everywhere across the world? It will be interesting to see what levels of interference are generated by this emerging technology. I personally am very much against it's roll-out because there are no deep studies that portray it as a safe-for-living-things technology, in fact the opposite seems to be true, but that aspect is probably not a topic for this website.
  13. Hello everyone .. I wonder if there anyone who uses a 3D metal detector to locate gold deposits @ around 15 to 20 feet deep... I have heard of larger nuggets of 1 and 2 pounds in size and gold deposits with 300 grams in a bucket of dirt being found in the river banks. Could a GPX with the New 30" coil could reach a 1 or. 2 pound nugget @ 4 feet deep... Im not interested in the finer gold just the bigger nuggets or a large concentrate of gold ..
  14. I welcome! Minelab is a hybrid MDS-10 Minelab multi-frequency metal detector and Ultra WideBand pulse radar from Chemring. In the summer of 2019, the Minelab MDS-10 project (version 2.0) was adapted to search for historical finds. For what I bought, for what I sell ( https://md-arena.com/sekretnyj-proekt-minelab-gibrid-detektor-georadar-novinka-2019/ ). Target sizes include coins and jewelry. Practical tests confirmed the effectiveness of the technology. In Russia expected that the novelty will be presented at the copy slate Detectival 2019. But alas... Does anyone know when? IMHO Minelab should enter the market of such devices.It is impossible to give the market all the time to LORENZ, MAKRO Detectors, Nokta, with ichony georadars. With respect.
  15. I would like to see what any of you have created as far as displaying your metal detectors at home. I'm looking for creative ideas to make a home display myself. I'm entertaining many ideas from open to closed displays, even using Curio cabinets. To be clear, I'm looking for ways to display machines primarily, which could be mixed with finds as well.
  16. Occasionally I've read that an eddy current (set up by a metal detector's transmitted signal and which generates a magnetic field to be 'received' by the detector's circuitry) in detected objects are confined to that object's surface. If true this can be relevant for materials of mixed metals (no, I don't mean alloys) such as some coins and some crown caps, as well as plated objects like cheap jewelry. There is a simple exposition common to US coin hunting which disproves this contention. The US 5-cent piece ('nickel'), with the exception of 4 years during WWII, is an alloy of 75% copper (Cu) and 25% nickel (Ni). Modern US clad dimes and quarters (and some other denominations, all minted after 1964) are a sandwich composed of a pure copper layer in the middle 2/3 of the coin and two surface layers (each 1/6 of the coin's thickness) composed of the same Cu-Ni alloy as the 5-cent piece. The US nickel's numerical target identification (TID) on every(?) metal detector is considerably lower than a clad dime. Example 1: MInelab Equinox -- nickel hits 12-13 and clad dime 25-26, typically. Example 2: Fisher F75 -- nickel approximate TID = 30. Clad dime approximate TID = 70. Yet a US dime is smaller in both diameter and thickness than a US nickel. If only the Cu-Ni (outer) layers of the dime contained the eddy currents then the TID of a clad dime should be lower than that of the nickel, not higher. Conclusion: at least some of the eddy currents are in the copper core of US clad coinage and thus we can generalize that eddy currents aren't simply confined to the surface of metallic objects.
  17. I started this project 2 or 3 years ago (so long I can't remember). Spurred on by recent field experiences and also a recent thread on Equinox settings I've finally finished it. I don't know if it's a completely new idea. I call it a 'test-stand' as opposed to 'test garden' just to distinguish it from the standard test gardens many of you either already have or at least are familiar with. There are other similar variable depth test gardens out there (seen on YouTube). This one has the advantage of continuous depth capability. It also allows 3-d target orientation angle (similar to pitch, roll, yaw of airplane). It's based upon the 30-60-90 triangle (remember that from geometry/trigonometry class in high school?): Here is a sketch which shows how to implement this concept: Shown in the sketch, buried at an angle, is a PVC pipe. A test target can be slid into the pipe a distance 2*d which will result in it being located at depth d. I used two sections of pipe (ID = 1.57 in., OD = 1.90 in.), side-by-side to allow me to put neighboring targets in the ground with some option of how close the two targets are separated. Think of this as burying a double barrel (side-by-side) shotgun with the stock end deep in the ground. All you see are the ends of the two barrels. The concrete (bag of Kwicrete) locks the pipes in place. Here's a closeup of those extruding barrels: Besides the tape measure (units of inches) you also see a hand-graded scale at left which I'll explain shortly. Here is an overall view: The two PVC caps, attached together, are for keeping water, dirt, and varmints out of the pipes when not in use. You'll notice a 1.5 in. diameter wooden dowel rod inserted into one of the pipes. More detail on that shortly, but the target is inserted into the dowel near its end and then the dowel is slid into the pipe. Holes for locating pins (you can see one of those -- gray plastic -- inserted to register the intended depth) are 1 inch apart leading to a depth resolution of 1/2 inch. (Again, refer to the 30-60-90 diagram to understand the relationship between insertion length and actual depth into the ground -- a 2::1 ratio.) Next I show the business end of the dowel rod: The black foam fills the chamber and holds the target (in this case a silver dime) in place. The hole in the dowel is actually lined with a plastic film canister (remember those from 35 mm film days?) which has been modified to conform to the circular cross-section of the dowel and thus be able to fit into the pipe. The second slightly smaller) large hole was put in there originally for a second target but so far I haven't used it -- likely of limited value. You can see the registration holes. The first one has a red '2' (difficult to see) just above it; the next (representing 2.5" depth) isn't labeled; the third one has a '3'; etc. These represent the resultant depth of the target when a registration pin is put in that hole and then the rod slid into the pipe until the registration pin keeps the dowel from going deeper. Although the chamber packing material can be made up of many materials, I chose ethafoam (polyethylene foam) high quality packing material. You typically find this in higher end electronics packaging such as with desktop computers. More commonly it is white but in this case I used black. I initially cut plugs with hole saw (see next photo) and then trim with a pocket knife as needed to fit the pipe: Ok, so now you're still wondering what that specially graded (homemade 'yardstick') is for. Again, referring back to the 30-60-90 triangle drawing, the 3rd side of the triangle is also related to the depth. It is squareroot of 3 times the depth. (Squareroot of 3 = 1.73.) That yardstick will indicate how far downrange (along the ground surface) that the target is located. This helps when you get an iffy response on your detector and want to confirm or deny that the surface location of the target is consistent with its depth. The units written on the scale are associated with the depth of the target. You can see from the sketch above that the max depth is 15". The largest common US coin that will fit the chamber (with some force...) is a half dollar. I didn't keep track of the cost but it's probably $30 or so, mostly for the PVC pipe and caps and the dowel rods plus a bag of Sacrete. (I'm counting labor as free. 😁) OK, now that I (finally!) finished this test-stand it's time to get busy making measurements. I'll be posting those here on the forum as they become available.
  18. Hi Guys, How many detector brands have Mixed Mode. Thanks in advance.
  19. If what we see of the face of the Vanquish is true with eighteen notch points then it’s bundled. This happens in lower end detectors but not totally true being it came in higher cost detector too My Sport wasn’t cheap but it too has the problem of having notch bundle . I have the ORX and to cut out anything I start at the bottom and work my way up . Like others I can’t pick what I want delete what I don’t want. The only one that we all know that will let you notch out what you don’t want and leave the others is the Nox . This is the main reason I don’t like my Sport is because of that. Don’t get me wrong I’d like it to run in more than one frequency but I knew that ahead of my purchase. I guess you couldn’t make me happy if you would hang me with a new rope. Just thinking out loud again! So why don’t you do the same here. Chuck
  20. These discontinued Minelab products are really cool to look at and read about. I was amazed. The Golden Hawk looked cool! Wonder what the Klondike looked like. https://www.minelab.com/usa/support/knowledge-base/discontinued-products
  21. Check this beauty out. Five km range and depths of up to 75 meters. And only $2500!
  22. Anyone remember the old Popular Science ads? I thought this was a good classic to share. Even though this ad pre-dates me by 6yrs, it puts a smile to my face :)
  23. I’m not so sure if I really have a opinion but maybe each here may . So please let me hear from you on this subject. Thanks! Chuck
  24. Just thought... it would be interesting if the technology ever came about where you could run one detector as either a VLF or a PI (orZVT). What machines would you combine? I would go GPZ and Equinox
  25. Yeah well as in inherently curious person, I was wondering when someone will design a smart phone app that makes your smart phone into a virtual metal detector. Might use a coil like the X35 on a carbon fiber shaft bluetooth connected or USB "c" connected. My Galaxy S10 + certainly has more than the processing power and ram required to do the job. Bluetooth headphone capable, gps, you name it. Just thinking again Johnny
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