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Found 59 results

  1. Makro Gold Racer and a small Nevada gold nugget it just detected The Makro Gold Racer has been one of my most anticipated new VLF metal detectors in years. This completely new model represents something I have wanted for a very long time – a high frequency VLF metal detector that does not skimp for features, in particular as regards discrimination options. A little background. First, I have been testing prototypes of the Makro Gold Racer, and this review is based on those prototypes. The final version due soon has a completely new LCD display layout, audio boost, refinements to other settings, and physical refinements like a change in the handle angle, etc. That being the case this review should be considered preliminary and final specifications are subject to change, as well as details you may see in my photos regarding the physical design of the detector. Second, what is the intended market for the Makro Gold Racer? The machine looks deceptively like many other detectors aimed at general purpose metal detecting. I want to emphasize that first and foremost this is a gold prospecting detector. There are only a few other detectors that directly compare to the Gold Racer which is running at a very high frequency of 56 kHz. Comparable detectors would be the White’s GMT at 48 kHz, the Minelab Eureka Gold running in its 60 kHz setting, and the Fisher Gold Bug 2 at 71 kHz. The intent with very high frequency detectors is to sharpen the response on extremely small metal targets. High frequency detectors are in a niche all their own when it comes to finding the tiniest of gold nuggets. This sensitivity does come at a cost however, in that the detectors are also responsive to ground mineralization and hot rocks that less sensitive, lower frequency detectors might ignore completely. There is no free lunch in detecting, and I want to caution anyone thinking that the Makro Gold Racer is going to be a magical solution to all their detecting desires to be realistic about things. Inevitably when new detectors come out people fall victim to wishful thinking, and I would like to try and avoid that here. When it comes to reviewing detectors I do the best I can to describe detectors to help people decide if they might be interested in them or not. Do realize again however that this review is based on preliminary information. Also, I honestly do not want people buying new metal detectors based solely on my reviews. There will be some of who want the latest and greatest right now, and I appreciate that, but being a first adopter does have its risks. My normal advice to people is to never buy anything based on a single review, but to wait for more of a consensus opinion to emerge. I have used the Gold Racer in the field, and I have found gold with it. Right now though if it is just a matter of you wanting to know if the Makro Gold Racer can find gold then I refer you to the excellent field review with photos posted by Ray Mills at the Detector Prospector Forum. In outward appearance the Makro Gold Racer resembles its immediate predecessor, the Makro Racer, but this really is a new detector, not just a Racer running at a higher frequency. Feedback on the original Racer has been incorporated as well as extensive testing and commentary from prospectors around the world. Besides the obvious color difference, major physical changes include completely redesigning the layout of the LCD display to better differentiate what are all metal functions and what are discrimination functions. All metal functions are on the left, and discrimination functions are on the right. I think the new display is more intuitive and better accommodates the extra functions implemented on the Gold Racer. The angle of the bend in the S rod handle grip has been relaxed based on feedback from Racer owners. The vibration mode was eliminated, shaving a tiny amount of weight and freeing up room on the display menu. The Gold Racer with stock 10” x 5.5” DD coil and NiMH batteries installed weighs in on my postal scales at exactly three pounds. Coils available at launch are the 10” x 5.5” DD that is stock on the detector. Optional coils include a 10” x 5.5” concentric coil, 5” round DD coil, and a light weight 15.5” x 13” DD coil. Makro Gold Racer with 5" round DD coil Let’s take a look at the functions. Under All Metal on the left side of the meter are the functions that apply only to the All Metal mode. On the right are the functions for the two Discrimination modes. The settings are independent in each mode, and once set can be saved when the detector is powered down. This simple and intuitive setup is also part of the power of the Makro Gold Racer. It is incredibly easy once each mode has been customized to flip quickly between the three modes, cross checking target responses to make a dig/no-dig decision. All Metal is the heart and soul of nugget detecting, and the Makro Gold Racer has an extremely powerful, smooth, and sensitive threshold based all metal mode. The Sensitivity setting is familiar to anyone who has used a metal detector, except that there are three base levels of sensitivity or gain. Significant boosts occur between 39 - 40 and again between 69 - 70. Most detectors max out at what is a setting of 69 on the Gold Racer. Settings of 70 and above are a type of hyper gain setting that takes the machine above and beyond, but in extreme ground overload signals may occur. Overload signals are indicated by a “warning siren” audio and the machine is telling you that there is either a large metal object under the coil, or that you are encountering extreme mineralization. In the case of mineralization, either raise the coil slightly while scanning, lower the sensitivity setting, or both. Overloads occurring at 70 will almost always be eliminated by dropping to 69. Rest assured very little is lost by lowering sensitivity to 69 or below, again, because many detectors cannot be set as hot as the Gold Racer even at their maximum setting. Do you ever run detectors and have the distinct feeling some performance has been left on the table, because the detector can always be run at maximum settings? Makro has given you that extra power for where it can be used, but in doing so they expect you will lower settings in places where that extra power works against you. Luckily, the audio alert makes it easy to know when this is. Most people do not know it but many detectors simply shut down and quit working under similar conditions with no indication at all to the operator, a situation referred to as “silent masking”. The threshold setting is the normal control that sets the volume of the slight audio tone that is key to any experienced nugget hunter finding the tiniest or deepest gold nuggets. The most minute variations in the threshold tone can indicate a gold nugget, and the ability to read the threshold is what sets most really good nugget hunters apart from everyone else. Makro has added a feature to the Gold Racer called iSAT, for “Intelligent Self Adjusting Threshold”. This setting consists of several levels of adjustment that vary the rate at which the threshold tone steadies itself. Higher levels of iSAT smooth the threshold more aggressively which aids in maintaining a smooth threshold in rapidly varying ground. Lower levels allow for faint variations to be heard more clearly in milder ground for extra depth and sensitivity. The Gold Racer can be ground balanced three ways. Holding the trigger switch under the control pod in the forward position activates an instant automatic ground balance. Just pump the coil over the ground a couple times, release the trigger, and you are done. There is a short delay when you release the trigger, and during this delay you may manually adjust the ground balance setting. The instant ground balance is neutral to slightly negative. Those that like a slightly positive ground balance need only perform the instant balance, then tap the right hand control button three of four times. The Tracking function on the control panel engages and disengages automatic ground tracking. This is most useful where the ground conditions vary wildly, a perfect example being mixed cobble piles or river bars. The tracking is very quick yet resists tracking out genuine gold signals as much as possible. This can also be an aid to anyone new to ground balancing detectors as it makes the process entirely automatic. The Backlight setting adjusts the illumination level of the backlit screen. The FD/Save setting allows adjustments to be saved when the detector is powered off, while the FD function resets Factory Defaults. There is also a Frequency Shift setting to help eliminate outside electrical interference from power lines, or another Gold Racer being operated nearby. This is set through a combination of control buttons but not visible on the menu. Finally, although this is a true threshold based all metal mode, the meter acts independently in discrimination mode at all times and indicates target id information when the signal strength is sufficient to do so. Makro Gold Racer - clear, bold display Under the Discrimination menu are settings that are completely separate from the All Metal settings and also saved or reset separately. Disc 1 is a standard two tone mode with low tone ferrous and higher tone non-ferrous. Disc 2 is a similar but deeper, more powerful mode. Quick switching between these two modes, each with fully independent settings, creates a many layered and subtle approach to target discrimination. Both discrimination modes are silent search, no threshold based systems. However, new to Makro models is the ability to set the point at which low tones flip, or “break” over into being higher tones. Typically 39 and lower target id will cause a low tone, and 40 and above a higher tone. This ability somewhat replaces the three tone mode on the original Racer because by increasing the Tone Break setting it is possible to create various coin detecting scenarios. For instance, all targets with an id number below copper penny could register low tone, and therefore copper pennies, dimes, quarters, and dollar coins a higher tone. Conversely, lowering the Tone Break setting would create a more conservative approach for nugget detecting by accepting a little more ferrous digging in return for possibly finding another nugget or two. The Sensitivity control on the Disc menu is the same as but independent of the All Metal setting of the same name. ID Filter is a variable discrimination control, with higher settings eliminating or blanking out id numbers lower than the current setting. This setting is independent for each Disc mode, and again flipping back and forth can create some interesting scenarios for comparing targets at completely different sensitivity and ID Filter levels. This quick mode switching between All Metal, Disc1, and Disc2, all with independent settings, is a very powerful tool once you get used to it. Also new with the Gold Racer is the iMask setting. I noted at the start of this review that all metal detector designs involve making trades of some sort. Extreme high frequency sensitivity to small metal targets does increase chatty false responses in extreme ground when in the discrimination modes. iMask attenuates or suppresses weaker target responses in the discrimination modes and provides a secondary level of adjustment separate from and in addition to the Sensitivity and ID Filter settings. If the detector is producing lots of quick, spurious signals in the discrimination modes, reducing sensitivity or increasing ID Filter settings or both is the first line of attack. If this does not work, go back to the original settings on those functions, and try increasing the iMask setting. If this does not work, again lower sensitivity or increase the ID Filter or both on top of the current iMask setting. iMask acts as a pre-filter giving an extra level of control to help deal with extremely bad ground conditions. Finally, Disc1 is a less aggressive mode than Disc2, so using Disc1 offers even another level of possible options when dealing with bad ground in the discrimination modes. The Backlight setting is independent for the discrimination modes, as is the Factory Default/Save Settings function. I think it goes without saying that there has never been a high frequency metal detector ever produced with this level of options and control. There are a lot of variables to play with here, and I would not be truthful at all if I said I have this machine all figured out. In fact, I think part of the fun with the Makro Gold Racer is we are entering uncharted territory. Until the final version of the machine is released, and until quite a few people get their hands on it and experiment, it is very difficult to say just what applications creative detectorists may find for the Gold Racer. It is a very powerful VLF gold prospecting detector, I can vouch for that. Applications also may be found for jewelry detecting and relic hunting in particular, and even coin detecting, due to the unique combination of features the Makro Gold Racer offers. OK, finally – some notes on real world use! Again, this is all based on prototype models and so I can only speak in generalities for this report. However, there is no doubt in my mind that even the prototype detectors rival anything currently available in a VLF detector for finding tiny gold nuggets. I can easily locate flakes of gold weighing under one tenth grain with the Gold Racer and the stock 10” x 5.5” DD coil. In fact, the machine is so hot with the stock coil I thought using a smaller coil offered minimal if any benefit, mostly because of lost ground coverage and possibly lost depth on larger nuggets. I would only use the smaller coil myself for nooks and crannies where the stock coil can’t fit, but otherwise the stock coil really is the way to go in my opinion. Keep in mind I did say grain not gram. There are 480 grains per Troy ounce and in my opinion I can find flakes all day long with the Gold Racer that weigh less than 1/10th grain, or less than 1/4800th ounce. Smallest nugget unweighable, largest 2.4 grams In trashy locations I generally preferred running in all metal and just checking the meter for ferrous targets, which tend to lock in hard at 21 or 22 on the numbers. In theory anything under 40 is ferrous, but to be safe I might investigate items as low as 35 or even 30 depending on the situation and amount of trash. However, as I noted most ferrous locks in hard around 20 leaving no doubt what the target is. In All Metal mode very tiny or very deep targets beyond discrimination range give no target id at all, automatically meaning they need investigation. The main reason I prefer to always hunt in All metal is the extra depth and sensitivity it affords, and checking targets visually is very quick and more efficient than toggling back and forth to a Disc mode under normal circumstances. For areas with too much trash where meter watching might get to be a bit too much, I normally use one of the disc modes set for two tone ferrous/non-ferrous. Iron targets just burp away, while non-ferrous target pop out with a beep. If even that got to be too much for some people, increasing the ID Filter to eliminate most ferrous responses completely can make for a quieter experience in really trashy locations. As always, I must include the warning that the more discrimination applied, the more risk of missing a good target. Use no more discrimination than needed to preserve your sanity! I used the Gold Racer to hunt a couple trashy areas where I just could not go with my big dollar all metal machine, and easily located nuggets in the midst of trash. For me personally the Makro Gold Racer fills in two areas where the high price big gun detectors come up short. The ability to find the tiniest, most dispersed gold possible, both in flake form or enclosed in specimen rock. And the ability to deal with really trashy areas where good discrimination is needed. Perhaps the biggest surprise for me was when I decided to give the 15.5” x 13” DD coil a try. Honestly, I did not expect much from it. You normally do not see a coil this large for high frequency machines because the ground feedback usually overwhelms them, negating any gains that can be had regarding depth. Instead, the Gold Racer seemed to be even better behaved with the larger coil than with the smaller coils. I hunted some cobble piles with it and it ran smooth as can be at higher sensitivity levels. I then wandered into some moderately hot ground with it, still with no problems, and was actually surprised when I came up with a couple small gold nuggets with it. The first was only 0.8 grams which I thought was pretty fantastic. So I put a little more effort into it, and found a 0.3 gram nugget. With a 15.5” x 13” DD coil on a VLF? That is really kind of unheard of, and I was thoroughly impressed. I am not sure what is going on there but I do know the Makro detectors can sense what coil is on the detector. Something different going on with that big coil? I don’t know, but the results and performance surprised me. Also surprising was that for such a large coil it actually was not bad swinging it for half a day. That could be from my using large, heavy detectors all summer however. Still, it was an eye opener all around and changed how I think my Gold Racer might get used in the future. It looks to have more use for covering very large areas blue sky prospecting than I would have imagined. Makro Gold Racer with 15.5" x 13" coil I would be remiss if I did not include at least a note on the versatility possible with the Gold Racer. I recently took it to a local park. Now, my ground in Reno is screaming hot, full of magnetite. The mineral percentage graph on the Gold Racer and similar machines all come up one bar short of maxed, and ground balance numbers run around 88-90. A magnet dropped in this stuff comes up with a lump of magnetite. As a result getting accurate target id numbers with even the best coin detectors past 5” is a chore. I know that sounds crazy but it is the truth. I ran the 5” DD coil and even then had to back the sensitivity down to 69 to prevent overloads in the worst areas. One thing about the Racer detectors that I have heard people complain about, and that is that they tend to up average target numbers in bad soil. For me this is a good thing. Many detectors will see target id number average lower in bad ground, and so fringe targets are more likely to get identified as ferrous when they are in reality non-ferrous. This is obviously not a good thing for nugget detecting. The Racer and the Gold Racer both tend to up average, and so targets like lead sinkers or aluminum that you would expect to give lower numbers often give coin like responses with the Racers. It is odd to see in practice. I got a good high signal reading near 80 at about 5” that when dug up turned out to be a common round lead fishing sinker. Out of the hole the target id promptly dropped to about 45. This effect whether by design or by accident is common with European detectors. I think it is by design because first and foremost these machines are made to pull non-ferrous targets out of ferrous trash. Improperly identifying a non-ferrous item as ferrous is the worst possible result, and so up averaging helps insure that non-ferrous items will not be missed. However, it also means these types of detectors are not as efficient at cherry picking coins as common coin detectors are. You get the coins for sure, but you dig more trash doing it. Still, I experimented a few hours and if you are content to live with the limitation I just described you can actually make some good finds with the Gold Racer under almost any conditions. The ID Filter works very well, and by just running it all the way to 79 it was easy for me to cherry pick a few coins though larger aluminum items like screw caps or big pull tabs often came up in the 80s also. I do think this is a result dependent on ground conditions to some degree, but really the Gold Racer is best suited for people like me who want to recover all non-ferrous targets. I prefer to hunt jewelry rather than coins myself, as one gold ring makes up for a pile of coins. And to hunt jewelry you have to dig aluminum, no two ways about that. The Gold Racer will suit me well hunting jewelry, especially micro jewelry like ear rings and fine chains. This report is very long, and yet I really am just skimming over the features and possibilities inherent in the Makro Gold Racer. I will close by once again noting that while everything regarding the Gold Racer is pretty much set in stone at this point, last second changes are possible. Look for more soon when the factory production models hit the street. I also get frustrated when people want information on new units, but then turn right around and characterize reports trying to provide that information as hype or a sales pitch. I have tried my best here to just present what facts I can without leading anyone to think that the Gold Racer is anything other than what it is. And that, in my opinion, is a very interesting, unique, and capable metal detector. I look forward to hearing for myself in the future what people think about it and the applications and tricks they come up with, because you pretty much need to toss anything you think you know out the door when approaching this machine. Many thanks to the folks at Makro and in particular Dilek Gonulay for providing me with the opportunity to be one of the first to use the Gold Racer. I admit that VLF detectors were beginning to bore me, and the Gold Racer has reignited my interest in seeing what they can do for me. Specifications and details on the Makro Gold Racer Disclosure Statement
  2. Version KKGR220316EN

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    Nokta/Makro Gold Racer User Guide, 2.97 MB pdf file, 28 pages Nokta/Makro Gold Racer Data & Reviews Nokta/Makro Gold Racer - Steve's Review Nokta/Makro Metal Detector Forum
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    Nokta/Makro Gold Racer Brochure, 2.66 MB pdf file, 4 pages Nokta/Makro Gold Racer Data & Reviews Nokta/Makro Gold Racer - Steve's Review Nokta/Makro Metal Detector Forum
  4. Hello Everyone! I am new to the forum and to metal detecting/prospecting. Hoping to meet some local folks with the same interests and everyone in between! Chris Mitchell (TXAUHunter)
  5. I bought my Makro Gold Racer a while ago and finally got the chance to get out with it. It works fine around my home. The first gold area I took it too, it went bonkers with a pulsing noise and the display target reading bounced all over the place. I was in the all metal mode with tracking on. I thought it might be EMI, since there was a massive radio tower about 1 mile away. I took it to another area away from any known towers and it did the same thing. The ground in both places is highly mineralized and variable. In the last place I turned up the iSat and that helped some. I also turned down the sensitivity which also helped some. Any ideas would be welcome. Maybe there is a problem with the detector or is it me???????
  6. Law 7.77 of metal detectors states that in order to get something, you have to give something up. (What are you giving up from Gold racer to Gold Kruzer?) What edge / advantage will the predecessor Gold Racer have over the soon to debut Gold Kruzer? Is the Gold kruzer undeniable the better machine? The MSRP on the Gold racer is more expensive when you dont count in the nice addons the kruzer has. The gold kruzer is bundled with $119~ wireless headphones in addition an extra 7.5"x4" Waterproof DD coil. My fever is getting me all itchy and I wanna pull in a Gold racer before the kruzer hits the streets. Have I gone too far with this gold racer fever?
  7. Hello Finally the big rains and snows are slowing down, so my partner and I decided to hit the hills. we tried a patch of ground in the thick manzanita between 2 sets of old hillside diggings. we were able to hit our own patch. Awhile back I let my partner use my Gold Racer and I havent been able to get her to give it back. ive been using the Racer 2 which is also a great gold detector. today we made a bet who could find the most. if I won then I would get to use goldracer next time. But I lost to my partner on the gold racer with her skills again. So I will still be on the Racer2. Good luck
  8. Steve: I spent about a month learning my Makro Gold Racer this summer. I went out almost every day. Most of the time I worked bare red soil over siltstone (ground balance values about 67) in and close to old pocket gold diggings in the Klamath Mountains. I didn't find any gold this year, but next summer I hope to do better. I have a few questions. Your answers might well help me succeed. 1) Would you advise I change the following protocol: In All Metal mode I ignore anything less than ID 5 or greater that ID 90 (lots of hot rocks here). I'm not inclined to dig anything that shows a dominate signal above ID 65 or anything that mostly grabs onto ID 20/21. However, most of my targets show multiple IDs (mostly in the teens and 20s with a few IDs above 70), and I dig any of these that show a few indications in the 40s or 50s amid the other IDs. 2) Do you feel you get useful information from careful attention to differences in the audio response? I discard responses giving the null-beep-null pattern even though I have seen some using a test nugget. Otherwise I ignore differences in the audio. 3) In one of your posts you dismiss using the Gold Racer in highly mineralized ground. I will have to deal with a lot of this next summer. Would you discuss the issues you had with highly mineralized ground?
  9. Hi got a chance of a s/h racer gold but can’t find anyone who’s used it in salt water or sand ? my Racer 2 is great but what’s the gold like ?
  10. Hi Steve, I googled the Makro Gold Racer for hints and settings advice and came across your review and this forum. I just purchased the large coil and when I first put it on it went crazy flashing numbers like it was possessed. It was unstable. The manufacturer said to bump the sensitivity down a notch. I did and it seemed to help, but it still freaks out every so often. On one hot day I couldn't get it to settle at all. Have you come across this and if so, what is your solution? I am searching in mineralized red dirt that has been turned by dozers due to recent fire. Settings: Sensitivity 30, Threshold 25, ISAT 10 Thanks for advice, I know this is an old thread... Katherine
  11. Pros & cons on these two detectors? (one versus the other)----All opinions welcome!
  12. A couple of weeks ago I was lucky enough to be offered the use of a Macro Gold Racer with an 8x4 inch coil by a prominent local metal detecting personality. His name is Julian and has the blog at www.marlboroughmetaldetecting.com where he keeps track of all his finds and such. My first outing was with the racer was a lazy Sunday trip to a spot on a local river that you can literally drive right into the river. I was with 4 other guys, one intended to snipe and the others had three different detectors between them. We spent a few hours here which saw me locate quite a number of very small lead shot targets in bedrock crevices but gold eluded me right to the end of the day when I found a tiny 0.12g flake. Initial thoughts about the detector after this outing was that it was quite hot at finding tiny targets and it was the only detector that found gold on this day. My next trip was to a somewhat more remote area that turned out a little trick to get to. I had suspicions that there might be gold in this particular waterway based on local geology and nearby discoveries. As soon as we go to the river it became apparent that the VLF detectors we had with us were not going to handle the local levels of ground mineralisation. Bedrock was a mixture of igneous rock that in some cases overloaded the detector completely. Despite the racers variety of settings to enable detecting in tougher ground I found it impossible to get it to function here. I could get it to run reasonably quiet but then I was only able to detect a half grammer at a couple of cm and the signal was far from crisp. And lucky last trip. I took the detector to a mates’ claim for a run. This spot is also in quite a public spot and myself and others have hammered it in the past. At an estimate I have taken a couple of oz’s from it in the past in the form of predominantly <0.5g nuggets. The racer ran very nicely here with sensitivity at 80 and isat at about mid-way. It didn’t take long before I started pulling tiny lead shot soon followed by a crevice that gave a weak signal. With a bit of chipping I recovered about 20 small flakes and colours to for a total of maybe 0.1g from the crevice (not in picture). The gold was all located in an area the size of a 10c coin. I was impressed at having found such small gold despite it being shallow as normally an aggregation of targets seems to be quieter than one large target of similar weigh. Or so I have found. I carried on for a couple of hours and got 6 further pieces of gold for a total of 0.2g as well as a bunch of lead. In fact, 5 of the pieces together weigh just 0.1g! So, it seems the racer is ridiculously sensitive to small gold and has plenty of scope to be manually adapted to different ground. Personally, I found the detector a bit on the “manual” side with the option of setting a lot of search parameters yourself. I know this is preferred by some and less so by others, just like manual and automatic cars I guess. I’d like to say thanks to Julian for the opportunity to let me use his Racer, especially as he didn’t know me at all. It’s always fun trying a new bit of kit.
  13. bought my first detector which is a gold racer. I detect mainly in the area from octave road to box canyon (Stanton az.) the ground has a lot of hot rocks also just a lot of rocks hard to keep coil on the ground. I started with the sensitivity and threshold on the high end in the 70-80 range just screaming in the head phones. after watching the video that was on this site now have set sensitivity at 15 threshold at 19 can now hear those whispers but no id on screen still dig all (quite a collection of lead and foil) maybe I should have started with a gold bug detector. I will keep swing what I have and hope to try a pi detector some day. being out in the desert taking in the beauty around me keeps a smile on my face also some yellow to make that whisper would be sooo great to.
  14. I received this question via email, edited to remove any tips as to the source: "Steve- been reading your reviews of detectors from way, way back. Now I'm looking for a bit of advice. I've got a claim where I've pulled nice gold, but the biggest single nugget has been just about a gram, pretty small stuff (but it's pretty plentiful). My GB-2 has really shined in this environment - shallow bedrock, low mineralization, and plenty of small gold. The issue is that my son doesn't want to let me use the GB-2, as he wants to use it all the time. That puts me in the market for another VLF machine. I've tried the GB-Pro, and didn't really care for it. Your review of the Nokta AU Gold Finder, and the Makro Gold Racer, both look pretty good. Other than the display and control box itself, are these machines really the same, or would one do better (coil size being equal) than another on small gold with low mineralization? The reason why I just don't go get another GB-2 is that it would be a nice bonus to use the new detector close by my son, while still hopefully having it excel and finding small gold. Any insights would be greatly appreciated. If there really isn't anything else that comes close, then I'll certainly go for another GB-2, even at it being as old as it is, but if there is another one that would excel in the above environment, I'd certainly appreciate your opinion on it." Well, in my opinion the 71 kHz Gold Bug 2 with 6" coil has been and continues to be the top of the heap when it comes to finding the tiniest bits of gold. So the real question is whether you feel like giving up that little edge the unit has over all the rest in order to run a machine right next to your son without the two machines interfering. You also have the advantage of being very well versed in the use of the Bug. Let's assume you do want to get something else however. You have mentioned the 56 kHz AU Gold Finder and Gold Racer, and they are indeed the same circuit in two very different packages. Coils from one will work just as well on the other. Other current new model alternatives would be the 48 khz White's GMT and probably the very soon to be available 45 kHz Minelab GM1000. Finally, I should mention the XP Deus V4 high frequency coil options hitting the market now in case you might consider a more exotic option. There also have been hints of a dedicated gold machine from XP this year. I would assume a small coil as being a must have, and an advantage with the Gold Bug 2 is you can get it with the small coil as a stock variation. So let's compare internet prices. Fisher Gold Bug 2 with 3.25" x 6.5" coil = $764 Makro Gold Racer with 5.5" x 10" coil $699 plus 4" x 7.5" coil $119 = $818 or Pro Pack $899 Nokta AU Gold Finder with 5.5" x 10" and 5.5" round coils = $999 White's GMT with 6" x 10" coil $729 plus 4" x 6" coil $127 = $856 Minelab GM1000 with 6" x 10" coil and 5" round coil = $799 A Deus runs $1250 plus the 4.7" x 9.5" elliptical HF coil at $425 = $1675 so not a good fit here for price and no smaller coil option than the elliptical. The only hope of that improving is if the dedicated gold machine shows up with the HF coil as stock. I have to admit that the reports of warranty issues with early Gold Racer models have me concerned. This despite the fact I have what must be the oldest Gold Racer and AU Gold Finder units in the country, and both are going strong. I have to assume the issues, whatever they were, have been ironed out. I don't know that for a fact however. If you got one and still had a problem, Nokta/Makro is famous for resolving issues with customer satisfaction. The units carry a two year transferable warranty. The GMT is the safe tried and true made in the U.S. option, and as far as performance the 56 kHz Gold Racers and 48 kHz GMT run neck and neck. The big unknown at an attractive price is the 45 kHz Minelab Gold Monster 1000. My best advice - wait! The flood gates are just now opening as regards reports on the GM1000 and at $799 with two coils it looks on paper at least to be an option worth waiting to find out more about. If you have to do something this minute, the GMT is the safe option if the reports of problems with the Gold Racers worry you. Personally, I have been very happy with my Gold Racer and would not trade it for a GMT. I have to note I finally did get another Gold Bug 2 with 6" coil however. If you are the sort of person who can't live without having that last small edge of performance, it is still the machine to beat for tiny gold performance in milder ground like you are describing. Click picture for larger version.
  15. Those of you that use this machine what are your favorite settings? Any advantage of using Disc 2? I may get to use mine soon and would like any advice to speed up my learning curve. Any problems at Rye Patch or Arizona with it? Info appreciated.
  16. A big hello to everyone. I've had a great season so far this year, and I've found lots of nice smaller nuggets, with the largest ones coming in around six grams, so nothing big, but a good collection this season with nice overall weight regardless. I'm curious as to what has happened with the reliability and product quality issues with the Gold Racer, as I haven't heard much lately. I'd love to hear an updated report from people that are actively using it to find nuggets. All the best, and thanks for your time, Lanny
  17. Hi Steve, in your posts you mentioned several times that you are using the Makro Gold Racer as a go-to detector for the jewelry detecting in parks, which surprised me quite a bit since I originally bought it as a micro-jewelry detector based on advice from Tom Dankowski. could you please share a few tips on how to best utilize the gold racer for that purpose? e.g. are you greatly reducing the sensitivity to ignore the smaller (aluminum) junk, what exactly you are looking for in the signal, do you ignore the no-number-just-audio signals, etc? I also have a CTX 3030 and was wondering how you'd compare the two for this particular purpose with the goal of digging the least amount of junk and using the screwdriver method of recovery. and last question - do you ever record yourself in process of detecting/recovering? It would be super helpful to see how its being done by someone like you - there is a Russian proverb that says "its better to see one time than to hear a hundred times". thanks in advance for your time, Sergey
  18. Makro dealers are now taking pre-orders for the new 2.4 GHz wireless headphones and transmitter module for the Gold Racer and Racer 2. They will start shipping dealers in June. MSRP: $119 PLEASE NOTE THAT THE NEW 2.4 GHz HEADPHONE OPTION IS NOT COMPATIBLE WITH THE RACER AND WILL ONLY WORK WITH THE GOLD RACER & RACER 2 MODELS. This is the last picture that was available but the actual shipping units may vary in appearance.
  19. I'm new to detecting and just purchased a Makro Gold Racer. No gold yet...but I'm trying. Anyone have any experience with a Gold Racer? I'm thinking I should have spent the extra bucks and went with the Garrett ATX...
  20. So I was out today for a couple of hours detecting, haven't even used the first set of batteries yet since I received my detector. After a couple hours the threshold all the sudden stopped working. Replace the batteries and still nothing. Sounds off on some targets but no threshold. Makes a crackling sound when I turn the detector off.... anyone know what the heck's going on with this thing?
  21. Hi friends. Greg here in Maine. So I've been gold panning and dredging here in maine for a few years now and decided to get a detector for use and fun when I'm not in the mountains and to use up there as well. Ended up buying a Makro gold racer as most of the gold here in maine is small and supposed the GR can hint other stuff as well. In all metal mode the IVD numbers seem to bounce around a lot. Is this normal? I'm having a hard time telling if there is a target or if it's mineralization.....
  22. Well I'm mostly healed from knee surgeries and decided it was time to get back at it. Despite all the smoke in the air in siskiyou county from the gap fire, it was not too bad outside. I headed out to an area that is one of many areas that ill be detecting this winter. it is not a well documented gold area, but it has good coarse gold. Most of the diggings in the area are shallow, but there is some good deep ground for pi detector work. For today I brought along my trusty friend Makro Gold Racer with the new 5x7 eliptical coil. I ran it about the same as other coils. in all metal and some isat adjustment. The place is plagued with alot of small iron and the little coil did a great job of sniping good signals out of the junk. it is extremely sensitive to micro sized targets and fits nicely under the bushes and between the rocks. it has a really nice sensitive tip for pinpointing. . all in all the 5x7 eliptical performed very well and would be a great accessory to hunt especially in the iron areas. well I ended up finding 16 pcs and 2.5 dwt for the little coils debut. I cant wait to try it out some more.Good luck
  23. Hello everyone. I'm a newbie looking to purchase my first detector. My budget is up to 1.000 €. I'm in Portugal, Europe. I'm looking to primarily look for gold nuggets as I live in areas where gold has been mined before (granite with quartz veins abound around here. The soil is highly mineralized and several streams cut through these granite rocks). But as I also live near the beach and also possible historical sites, I would like to try my luck with some coin / jewelry / relic hunting. I would say 70% gold hunt and 30% coin/relic/jewelry hunt. Will a more specialized gold hunting machine be able to also find coins? I don't quite seem to find that answer. Preferably I would like a machine where I could switch frequencies without having to change the coils. But I guess that throws me into a much higher price tag? I narrowed it down to the Makro Gold Race and the Minelab X-Terra 705 Dual. I'm slightly more inclined to the Makro because its coils can be submersible. Any other suggestions within the set of functions I'm looking at? Having two machines is no option for me, not only because my time is limited, and also because my wife might divorce me ;)) (unless I get rich doing it, that is...) Thanks for your tips.
  24. Good day everyone, I'd like to tap in your knowledge for my next MD choice. I've been using the teknetics delta 4000,then I saw that a local dealer is offering on sales a Makro Gold Racer and a Makro Racer 2 at the same price. I'd like to find small pieces of gold and the high freq of the gold racer should be ideal and i saw plenty of vids on youtube of its very high sensivity. But on the other hand I don't like the idea of getting stuck in a over specialized md. So my question is the following: is the gold racer viable also for coins, jewelry, or is built only for very tiny gold specs? Is the makro 2 more advanced? thanks!
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