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  1. Not a Sole to be seen! Granted the Weatherman was calling for Winds from a mild Cold Front moving in from the North East. Condor, gave me a call stating he was heading out for a Hunt, I gave him the Weather report for the area and a turn down to join. It brought mild rain to my area of Reno. The next day another Partner gave me a Call, I told him I’ll watch Weather and told him Condor was supposed to be out there. Weather Report was perfect, I text my Buddy…Hunt’s on and to met at the October Patch (a gold patch in Rye Patch) to setup Camp. Perfect weather, Cool and Sunny as I unloaded my RZR and remember all the Bullets of Sweat of the hot Discovery Day of the October Patch. My Trusty Hunting Partner pulled up and geared up as I text Condor asking his whereabouts! He called back and said, he headed back home after his day hunt with limited success. Again, not a Sole to be seen with the perfect Fall Weather! Giving it some thought of where to start on the drive up, I remembered this long Ridge that I found a Patch of Gold at both ends, but few nuggets in the middle. Both of us feeling fresh legged at the Noon Hour we set off to the ridge. I dropped my Partner off at the edge of the well hunted end of Ridge Patch and I’d pull up 1/2 mile with the RZR and start there and head up Ridge and then when he reach RZR he’d pull up 1/2 mile ahead of me and I’d repeat to end the days swing for the Missing Link Patch. Well I’m swinging away, enjoying myself when I feel my stomach telling me to refill it. I turn around to see where my Mobile Chuck Wagon was at! It was at least a Half Mile back and my Partner wasn’t in view below it. I swung back to the RZR, picking up one dink nugget that lead to another One Nugget Patch. Refueling my growler, my Partner comes screaming up the side of the Ridge, like he is running from a Mad Coyote that was chasing him. He had something in his hand, but his Smile gave it away at 20 yards! He plopped one of those Legendary Nuggets into my hand. My eyes and smile matched his! 😳 Both of us with filled stomachs drove back to his 8 Nugget Bonanza! A small drainage feeding off the ridge with a Dink Nugget at the head and a dink at the bottom lead him into the Flats between a distant Ridge. I’ve always considered this a No Go Zone as a No Gold Zone…as I’ve spent more than few hours in that Sage Brush with No Joy. We reach his Discovery Patch, in the Middle of Nowhere! 100 yards off our target Ridge. We named it “The No-Where Patch” right then and there. Partner, found the sweet spot of his Patch and I circled it like a hungry shark extending the perimeter. The No-Where Patch had two gaps that anyone could have swung a coil thru the middle of it without a clue of a missed Payday. The length of the Patch is around 30 yards and maybe 12 yards at the widest. We pounded it with our 6000’s and the next day I went over the sweet spots with a very slow swing with my 7000 with hopes of some deep missed ones, zero missed nuggets. Which indicates the vast majority of this Placer, shallow patches. We did pick up a few on the very outskirts of the No-Where Patch, which may lead to the next nugget patch yet to be named! Wore out, we headed home at sunset of the second day. Partner’s Big Boy at 1.6 ounces and his other big nugget to the right of that was a near 1/4 oz at 4.9 dwts. My Big one was 3.6 dwts on left. The High Plain Deserts still yield its treasures to the hungry seekers! Until the next Hunt LuckyLundy
    50 points
  2. I haven't posted much in the way of finds the last year or so. It's not that I don't want to share with others what I've found. It's just that a lot of the time it ends up compromising a site that me and my hunting buddies have spent hours and hours researching, getting permission and making multiple recon trips to. Now that I feel like we've pretty much cleaned this site out, I think I can safely post some of the finds for others to enjoy. It all started in April of last year. First trip we made I used the Equinox 800 and 30 minutes into the hunt I knew it was going to be a great site. Literally the 3rd target I dug ended up being an 1852 $2 1/2 gold coin. Below are some pictures of my finds. We made about 4 trips to the place in total and I'll make some other posts at a later date showing what else I found. That's about all the information I'm going to give about the site.
    41 points
  3. I love hunting the wet sand at the beach but I am fortunate to have a few lakes to detect when conditions are sanded in. My last trip to the lake produced 3 more gold rings but the best one was a deep class ring that I am guessing was lost many years ago because it is over 40 years old and has very little wear. It's a hefty little ring at 14.4 grams and has a name in it so I have already taken steps to locate the person who lost it. I found this ring in an area that I have hunted many times before but this one was deeper than most and found using the "all metal' mode of the Excal. I usually hunt lakes using some kind of discrimination because of the trash but this find may encourage me to go back and try for some more deep targets and just tolerate all the trash.
    28 points
  4. I hunted each day for the last 3 days, the first 2 being freshwater hunts. On the first day I was using my Nox 800 with the new control box that I got recently. I was a bit reluctant to submerge it again but it worked fine with no leaks and in the first hour of use I nearly paid for the new replacement box with an 8 gram, 14K, hollow gold bracelet. I was on an overnight trip and forgot to bring the Nox battery charger so I hunted with the Excalibur the next day and had one of my best hunts this year with 4 pieces of gold jewelry totaling 30 grams. My Excalibur is one of my least used machines but in a side-by-side comparison with the Nox, in this particular location, I preferred it and felt really confident with the different tones. Each piece of gold was a low to mid tone and when I got those tones it was pretty exciting to see what I scooped up. Sure I found a lot of pull tabs, nickels and other low/mid conductors but I didn't get discouraged because it felt that the odds of finding gold were in my favor. From the surf forecast and news reports calling for a sizeable hurricane swell, I just couldn't resist checking out the beach after I got back from my lake trip. I was tired and sore but decided to take the TDI Beach Hunter for a spin during low tide. The swell was definitely impressive and I found a few pockets of targets in the wet sand. I wound up with about 50 coins and one small but pretty 14K ring with a small diamond making it 3 days in a row finding gold with different detectors each day - a first for me, I believe.
    26 points
  5. Yesterday was my first chance to get out and test the new V2.0 update. I had every intention of just popping over to my local test park to see how the update performs, but I had some errands to run and ended up on the south end of the city. When I got done with the errands, I only had an hour or two left to do my update tests so I decided to go to a nearby park that had given up a Denver Tramway Company uniform button (circa 1888-1893) back in April. I hadn't been back there since. I had been doing some research on this park area and knew there was a neighborhood there from the 1930s, to about 1960, but after finding the older button there in April, I had a hunch there was much older stuff to be found. There were some large elongated mounds at the back of the park next to the large creek that runs there and I thought those might have been made by the bulldozers when they demolished the old neighborhood. That large creek had created a devastating flood in the 1920s that wiped away a Victorian era park there made by the city founders in the 1890s. The park was pretty busy so I decided to hunt the back of the mounds by the creek for a little while just to test a few programs and then head back home since I only had my 11" coil with me and I was just going to hunt coins to test V2.0. I wasn't finding much but a few coke cans and the usual park surface trash but I started hitting a lot of big iron signals. I was thinking of packing it up when I heard a few interesting solid high tones mixed in with the iron. I was running my Fast program in 24 kHz with Reactivity at 3 to deal with the iron and felt confident that it was running the same as with V1.1 when I hit a dime signal. It turned out to be a 1981-D dime. I thought, okay everything sounds normal, then I hit an unusally big iron tone and dug out a large hand forged chain. Now that's old, I thought to myself and then I hit a solid 94. Well that has to a quarter or a large bottle cap for sure, and most likely a large bottle cap. I dug through the iron and moist ground about 4 inches and there was a mud covered quarter. It looked a bit odd, but with no time to clean it off I popped it in my pouch. I kept hunting for another hour or so finding a few interesting and not so interesting things. I hit an almost too loud 84 and new it would be really large bottle cap or can bottom and pulled out and almost perfect ball of hardened mud. I could see some of a metal rim sticking through the mud ball and thinking it was a can bottom threw it in the junk pouch and headed home. I was feeling good that all of the targets were sounding and IDing pretty much the same as before the update and the few other programs I tested performed the same as well. Then I set out cleaning out the junk pouch first to make sure there weren't any keepers in there. That's when the mudball split open and I could see unmistakable green hue of something copper. As I gently cleaned the large disk I started to make out what looked like an Egyptian Pharoh's head on each side of the disc. Now that can't be real, I thought. I think it might be some kind of souvenir piece from Egypt or possibly from museum exhibit held at some time maybe. I looked at some of the keeper pouch finds and I have no idea what the large copper disk with the glass domed front is. There is also a mundane rectangular aluminum or tin thing that is stamped "Little OEM Bank, New York, Pat. Apl 14, 1891". Then I started cleaning the odd looking States quarter that looked like it was caked with a mix of soil, mud, and tar. I thought it had an Indian sitting on a horse on one side when I flipped it over and could see a familiar looking eagle, but not a modern eagle. After I got through the soil and mud, I could see the old eagle better and on the other side was... OMG, a Seated Liberty!!! I still can't believe it! That's both my first silver quarter in the wild and my first Seated Liberty coin! I cleaned the tar enough to make out the date and then stopped. It's 1857 with no mint mark that I can see. So what started out as a simple test run ended up netting 2 bucket listers in one!
    25 points
  6. A school I've been interested in for a little bit. Today was the fourth time I've hit it. But even including today, only about 8 hours total. Had not found old silver, yet, before today, but enough deep wheats that I felt there had to be some silver waiting. I have found a couple nice .925's there the three previous hunts. With the days getting shorter, I only had about an hour and a half of daylight to hunt this morning before the soccer army arrived en masse and it was time to go. Just a gorgeous morning to be out though. Cold enough to be comfortable in a hoody. Nobody there but me until the soccer horde descended. I don't mind the soccer horde though, they are no doubt the source of the fairly consistent .925 here. Running the Manticore in ATHC, sensitivity 20, recovery 5, one region all tones, finally pulled a silver coin out of this field, a '39 Merc from 7" deep. That's pretty good depth for any machine in this dirt and it gave a definitely dig me signal. When soccer is done soon, and before the snow flies, I need to spend some more hours here. Also pulled a .925 cross, that I initially thought was probably junk. It was balled up in mud and I thought it might be some sort of stainless steel clip or something. But I also thought it there was a chance it was some sort of bling so I put it in the keepers side of the nail pouch. And after rinsing the mud off at home saw it is indeed a silver cross of sorts. Truth be told, I'd MUCH rather be out in the desert ghost towning. But things have not lined up for that lately. Nobody else wants to go and I'm getting just old enough that going by myself on longer trips isn't as much fun as it used to be. But, even though I'd rather be doing that, I'm sure not unhappy getting in some fun turf hunts when I can! Seeing silver in the dirt is always a good feeling! - Dave
    25 points
  7. I went to a local park in Albany, OR last Sunday. I wasn't having much luck, with mostly trash and a few clad coins. I was digging a lot of the older square tabs which come in at around 75 on my Deus 2. I got another signal with a 75 target ID, and I figured that it was another of the older square tabs. I almost passed it up, but then I decided that I might as well dig it up. Boy, was I ever surprised! It was a 10K gold girls class ring from 1957. It was about 6 inches deep. It weighs 7.5 grams. This is the third gold ring for me this year. Every gold ring that I have found over the years I have been metal detecting, I was sure that they were going to be some kind of trash. You have to dig a lot of trash to find the gold.
    25 points
  8. I attended our detecting club meeting on Friday night and this was my display. I found a lot of foreign coins this month, quite a few very worn wheats, a silver dime and silver quarter. You may have seen some of these items on another thread. It was a fun month but I didn't get out to the gold fields. Maybe this month I will.
    23 points
  9. Sorry about that -fixed now!
    22 points
  10. I was able to test and hunt with Deus 2 with 9" coil using FMF Goldfield V2.0 software for about an hour at a Colorado location with very tough magnetite and hot rock mineralization where I have found very small gold nuggets with the ORX in the past. Deus 2's mineralization meter was full at the testing and hunting site. I also took a photo nearby showing some marble sized pieces of magnetite as found on the surface which continue under the surface too. I dug a shallow 6" deep trench, cut a slit into the sidewall of the trench at 2.5" depth and inserted a plastic strip with a 0.1 gram piece of lead glued on it for a test target. V2.0 FMF Goldfield High Square VCO audio with Disc IAR 0, sensitivity 95, reactivity 2.5, audio response 4, threshold 5 hit the target very well and even displayed a target ID of 26 to 30 which is right on the ferrous/nonferrous borderline. I also tested this test target with Deus 2's Fast40 mono 40kHz program in Hi Square Pitch tones with Disc. on -6.4, Silencer 0, sensitivity 95, frequency 39.5 kHz, reactivity 2.5, audio response 4, threshold 5. Fast 40 also hit this target but with no ID and with slightly weaker responses. Those FMF Goldfield settings were actually a little too hot for this location so I increased reactivity to 3 and lowered audio response to 3 which helped a lot. I had to do some fairly frequent ground balancing since there were changing ground conditions with differing levels of soil moisture and magnetite sizes ranging from specs to golf ball sized. I did not find any gold during this short 1 hour hunt with Deus 2 FMF Goldfield V2.0. I did find three very indicative lead fragment targets however. All three were easily detected and had proper low conductor target IDs after a bit of a boot scrape. All were found at around 3" depth. Deus 2's V2.0 Goldfield sensitivity is much improved from previous software versions. Like I said, it was almost too hot for this location. I had my Nokta Legend with 6" coil along with my GPX 6000 with me for the hunt. I didn't even fire up the GPX 6000 due to time constraints and a sore right shoulder. The Legend hit all of the targets that Deus 2 hit but ran a little quieter probably due to its smaller coil. The Legend and Deus 2 have so much information available on the display even in their gold modes. They both have a ferrous/nonferrous probability meter which is all you get on some gold prospecting specific VLF detectors, a mineralization meter, numerical target IDs, depth meter, single digit level notching, onboard pinpointing along with other great features like SMF operation which gives good IDs and no nonsense ground balancing, iron filter settings, audio response settings, reactivity/recovery speed settings, fully adjustable threshold volume and pitch settings, and various audio options. All Deus 2 needs now for high quality gold prospecting is a smaller coil. Thanks again XP for making FMF Goldfield V2.0 a very viable small gold prospecting option!
    21 points
  11. I like the country well enough. It is much better digging and scraping than my claims in Montana. Gold is not as pure as what I am used to, but gold is gold and it is still fun plucking it out of the ground. I have found three patches in a weeks time. One has given up 18 nuggets with the biggest around 1 g and I just found another one today that has given up 6 nuggets in about an hour. I'm heading back there in the morning. I was going to stay here until first or second week of October but over all I am not overly impressed with hunting NV. I will take Gold Basin and Lost Basin any day. The gold is higher purity in AZ where I hunt and since I only have the gold to pay bills and eat , this pale gold won't bring me as much when sold. So I am pulling out in about a week or week and a couple days for Gold Basin. Here is the gold I got today in my new patch.
    20 points
  12. My last couple of hunts have helped make up for the long hot dry Summer. The token dates to the very early 1900s. He was still in the 1923 telephone book but as a Manufacturer, no longer a tailor. The 1898 Sanborn map shows his address as a Tailor shop. I know a family of the same name & will enquire of them. Hopefully their Great grandfather. If so, they may like to have it. The combination tool is a special find for me. It gave just enough of an interesting tone to not be another cut nail. It was dug in the front yard of where a pre War cabin stood on the old main road, nearby to the old Republic blockhouse site. Troops were documented to have rallied & camped there on their way East to the action. Side arms were usually only carried by officers or Cavalrymen. The other items are just nicely interesting to me. The brass ring with ball may be some sort of buggy curtain rod ring. The ointment tube top is another example of the ornateness & attention to detail that was once give to even ordinary everyday items. All dug with the MXT in Relic mode.
    19 points
  13. So I decided to spend the day at the mill where I recycle. Lots of hard labor 😄. I'm almost there and I pass this old park that I tell myself I am going to detect one day. It's about 20 minutes from my house to the mill. What do I see there?....... Are ALL the sidewalks torn away? 😲😲😲. Crap, I turned around and went back home and grabbed the Manticore. Hopefully the city dump truck parked there will not kick me out. Nope, smooth sailing. I must have been the second person to detect there, since I could only come up with 5 cents. Tons of nails and small bits of junk. Not a silver or nickle signal to be found. I hunted all of the trenches for about 2 hours and that was it. But I'm happy with the 4 Indians as they were older than most Indians I would get out of parks. This park was very active in the 1890's. I did detect the grass for a while and got no high conductors and it was very sparse on any targets. Someone has probably been hammering this place for years. I may try the GPX there, but it is a very sketchy neighborhood. Target of opportunity is the name of the game sometimes.
    19 points
  14. Hurricane Idalia went up through the Gulf of Mexico a little over 2 weeks ago. It caused significant erosion along some portions of the west coast of Florida. I've been hunting mainly where the erosion has stripped large sections of sand up to the dunes or seawalls. Most of these finds were in the eroded areas including the two 14k and the broken 10k ring. The storm pulled a lot of sand off the beach and into the water. Not many finds in the water, probably because everything out there is covered up. One of the rings pictured is silver with a small 18K circle of gold on its side with the manufacturers name on it. Another picture shows where a walkway went down to the water. Nothing left but the last support that held it up. There was at least 100 feet of sandy beach at that spot before the storm. Now the water is right up to the seawall with boulders shown. I was amazed that in one long stretch of beach loads of sinkers were found but no gold was found in that area. I've been back several times now where all the sinkers were found but still can't pull out any gold...yet. Unfortunately, the sea turtle nests were wiped out for miles. Nothing left but some yellow painted sticks that marked where they once were. Bob
    18 points
  15. In Maryland we have the State parks where some have closed beaches, and others have limited hours (7am to 9am) to hunt during the summer. Than after labor day "all" let you in at 7am (til dark) to hunt all you want until June 1st or Memorial Day the following year. I hate getting up early but this spot is about 20 minutes away so I went for it (7am). In the 3.5 hours I did score a small 2.7 gram gold 14k with the excalibur. Only 6 hunters there during my time and the reason I found is, most went to the closed all summer beaches. It was fun and interesting for I rarely dig pull tabs and bottle caps where I hunt normally.
    18 points
  16. The weather cooled after the last batch of thunderstorms, so I thought I might make a quick trip to RP to see how much erosion took place. I got out there late Tue and set off to explore in my Polaris RZR. I spotted some freshly exposed bedrock and gave it a go with the GPX 6000 and the 14x9 Coiltek coil. Nothing in the bedrock, but pulled a tiny .2 piece from fluff gravels at the end of a small gully. Further up the gully I hit a 1+ gram piece, again in the fluff gravels, not on bedrock. I worked my way back to the RZR and found she wouldn't start. Cranking just fine, no fire. I was already dreading a 3 mile walk back to the truck when she kicked over and came to life. Not wanting to take chances for a long walk in the dark I drove back to my truck. She wouldn't start again, so I loaded it on the trailer using the winch. Next morning I aired down the tires on my big ole diesel GMC 4x4 and stuck to the trails. I hit some more bedrock and pulled another 1+ gram piece out of the bedrock. Clear sky to the west, but one lonely storm cloud found me and dumped rain for about half hour. I detected for another couple hours for nothing but ferrous trash. I really did not want to beat my truck up on those washed out roads so I gave up and came home. For those planning a trip out there this fall, the roads are passable. The main Rye Patch road will need some work on a culvert that washed over the road, passable but just barely. The lake is full and muddy. Cows with yearlings everywhere on both sides of the road. Take it slow, those yearlings will dart right out in front of you. I didn't make it to the Burn Barrel, so I'm not sure how that road looks. I took the 2nd left turn and it was OK all the way to Dan's claims. 1 big washout you have to straddle 1/4 mile from the turnoff. Still another couple weeks before the weather gets cool enough for my liking.
    17 points
  17. Amateur makes ‘gold find of the century’ in Norway A man out walking on “doctor’s orders” with a newly-bought metal detector has discovered a huge haul of gold by accident. A Norwegian out walking on doctors’ advice unearthed rare 6th-century gold jewellery using a newly bought metal detector, a discovery archaeologists said on Thursday was Norway’s “gold find of the century”. “At first I thought it was chocolate coins or Captain Sabertooth coins,” said 51-year-old Erlend Bore, referring to a fictional Norwegian pirate. “It was totally unreal.” The cache comprised nine Norwegian gold medallions and gold pearls that once formed an opulent necklace, as well as three gold rings. Amateur archaeologist Erlend Bore posing with a gold treasure photographed shortly after he found them with a newly-bought metal detector. (Photo by Anniken Celine Berger / various sources / AFP) / Norway OUT Archaeologists say the find is unique because of the design on the medallions -- a type of horse from Norse mythology. Bore, who dreamt of becoming an archaeologist as a child, made the discovery on a farmer’s land near Stavanger in August after he bought a metal detector on his doctors’ recommendations to get more exercise. He had been out searching and was about to head home for the day when the device suddenly began beeping on a hillside. He called archaeologists, who took over the search. Mr Bore found these coin-like gold pendants. (Photo by Erlend BORE / NTB / AFP) The treasure consists of nine gold medallions and pearls that once formed a luxurious necklace, as well as three gold rings. (Photo by Anniken Celine Berger / various sources / AFP) The jewels, which weigh a little more than 100 grammes, were discovered to date from around 500 AD. “It’s the gold find of the century in Norway,” said Ole Madsen, the head of the University of Stavanger’s Museum of Archaeology. “To find that much gold all at once is extremely unusual.” The most recent comparable find in Norway dates back to the 19th century. A reconstruction of the necklace Mr Bore found (Photo AFP) “Given the location of the discovery and what we know from other similar finds, this is probably a matter of either hidden valuables or an offering to the gods during dramatic times,” professor Hakon Reiersen said. In line with Norwegian law, both Bore and the landowner will receive a reward although the sum has not yet been determined. Amateur makes ‘gold find of the century’ in Norway | news.com.au — Australia’s leading news site
    17 points
  18. I was invited to tag along with friends to do a little detecting in the high mountains recently. I figured even if I didn't find anything good, it would be worth it just to be up in the high country for a couple days and it totally was. I got up there fairly early and met up with one of the crew and we followed the train tracks for a while to look for some interesting spots to detect. We found a wide spot in the trail and decided to give it a try. To be honest, it didn't look like the was ever anything there, but you just never know. I pulled out the D2 and decided to use the 9" coil to be able to get into the brush better and started out in my 40 kHz Fast program. Even though it didn't look like there was much there, the ground noise told a different story with the familiar machine gun iron and high falsing tones. I was digging mostly big iron, square nails, and other trash for the first hour or so and I decided to change it up to give my ears a break. I changed to 24 kHz and dropped the sensitivity and audio response a notch or two and thats when everything changed. All of a sudden the falsing reduced, good non-ferrous targets stated popping through the iron noise, and I made my first good find which was a heart pendant. I kept on digging the good sounding targets until the afternoon rainstorm came in and we had to pack it up. So I ended up with a bunch of interesting items from the late 1800s to the turn of the last century, including a nice Rogers Nickel Silver spoon, a clock back, a pair of fancy but corroded scissors, a piece of a broken printing plate, a fancy screw cap to an oil lamp, a brass keyhole cover for a padlock, a religious pendant, some cool old buttons, a suspender clip, garter clip, and a Colorado Tax token. The heart pendant, which I thought was probably from the 1930s or 40s, turned out to be from a very rare souvenir necklace from the Crystal Carnival Ice Palace built in Leadville Colorado in late 1895 and was dismantled in March of 1896. I've included the only photo I could find of one that was from an antique auction site to show what it use to look like before being in the ground for almost 130 years. This one was a heartbreaker! I found it with the bottom side up in the hole and thought I had a gilded railroad conductor or military button for sure, but when I turned it over there was no top.... Nooooooo! I search all over for the top, but no luck. 😧
    17 points
  19. Got a LOUD high tone on the Manticore as I was about 5 steps away from leaving the beach on Friday. I scooped it up even before looking at 2D line or the TDI numbers. Just thought it was another fresh dropped quarter. But that "clanking" in the scoop told me otherwise. LOL I suspected that it was a coin ring but had to wait until I got home and under the loupe. The 1937 date is faint but still readable especially with the loupe. The inside of the ring has a lot of great detail to it. One side has the reeded edge although it is worn down quite a bit. I can only speculate whether the ring belonged to someone's parent, grandparent or just a random ring made from a 1937 Walker. Thanks for looking!!!
    16 points
  20. Yesterday I went out to a beach I haven't been to in a while and conditions were right in one location to produce some unusual finds. I found seven worn wheats, one silver dime (1959), an old Mexican coin (1940) and a medallion from Progress Refrigerator Company. That company was also the Louisville Tin and Stove Company started in 1888. The medallion says over 50 years of Progress so ... who knows when the medallion was made. One thing I did learn was that Progress made the vintage Coke coolers that are sold on eBay and other places. Interesting research and maybe someone out there knows more. The stuff was in a 50 yard stretch of beach and most of it was covered in a green patina. I normally use vinegar to remove it but this time I tried something different. I used Costco (Kirkland) sparkling water and it fizzed and fizzed the stuff away, perhaps better than vinegar. I still lost my thumb nails with chipping it away.
    16 points
  21. Rainy morning here in the Mid Atlantic, but I timed it perfectly so I would miss the rain. It was 64 when I got there, but the sun came out later and it was perfect for detecting. Targets were hot from the rain. V2 is no different for me than the earlier version, they didn't change anything or much, yay. Today I tried lowering sensitivity to 87, and found iron wrapped less. It still hit coins at 10" at least. There were no events at this beach last weekend, so I didn't expect much, and really didn't expect to be the only one there all day. The tide got extremely low from the wind, so all the right things happened. It was also a bit sanded out by the wind from Lee. Didn't dig much trash, just the usual junk and annoying .22 short bullet shells that are everywhere here. Here's the haul, 6 earrings, one pair. Unfortunately none are silver or gold. I even got more copper memorials than Zincolns! 8-7. 🥳 I found the first tiny butterfly with the clasp on it, so I was pretty sure I'd find the pair, and I was right. Got at least one of every coin, so I wasn't missing anything for sure. Best find of the day was a 64, it was just too solid and clean for a pull tab: Moroccan 1 Dirham, worth about 10 cents US. It's at least 2002, and features Mohammed VI on the obverse. Exactly the same size as a US quarter, and made of copper/nickel. Parts of Morocco were destroyed recently by earthquakes, so it's kinda ironic to find a coin from there, never seen one. I find the strangest stuff at this beach. 🤔
    15 points
  22. Last week was a success. The highlight was probably one of these rings below with the 1 large diamond. As you can see next to it, I have an almost matching ring! These were found at 2 different beaches about 1km apart. 1 whilst diving at low tide, and the one last week was just in the rocks. Both of them are marked "18k plat" for 18ct gold and platinum. I'm not sure how to measure diamond ct but it's a nice stone for sure. Diamond tester shows positive. I'm guessing by other rings I've found nearby that it's a 1930's ish art deco style ring. Open to other suggestions if it's earlier or later. When I first dug the target, mixed with sand and clay it just looked like another gold earring. I was very happy to see that diamond. I think I've found close to 100 gold rings at this spot and well over 350 rings all up just on this 1 beach. Never gets old seeing that diamond glimmer. Manticore last week. Deus 2 for the one with the smaller diamond. Both very clear targets. Highly mineralised ground. HH
    15 points
  23. Reese, Nice Hunting you’ve had! There’s plenty of Nuggets to find out in that vast desert. Sounds like you sell your Pokes to refineries and need a few extra Karats to make the best of your time and effort. There is better Karat quality out there in spots. There’s also, some of the best Chevron nuggets out there in the World and many other Crystalline structures that will raise and eye on the oldest dealer/buyer at the Tucson Gem Show. I’ve left gold to find gold countless of times and Gold Basin is on that list. Keep adding patches to revisit in each Gold District you hunt, they are all separately special. LuckyLundy
    14 points
  24. Just a kids ring, but a ring is a ring is a ring, I also think the hamsa hand is cool too, found these in three close by tot lots, two on the same school, and one in a park
    13 points
  25. During last week's event at a 1750s farm in Ashburnham, MA, I pulled a domed lump of rust from about a foot under a former pasture. There wasn't much to see apart from the tab sticking out on one side, and the very obvious nipple. This immediately led to the designation of "colonial pasty", but nobody had a clue as to what it really was. At home, I dropped the find in evaporust for a week, with daily brushings. It soon became evident that the little dome was decorated. It was too small for a Victorian door knob, and then there was that tab sticking out. A friend suggested it might be a bit or bridle boss. Modern ones are mostly plain and are typically made from lead or copper alloy. But 18th century ones are often elaborately decorated and are sometimes made from cast iron. The remaining tab on mine (there were two, but only a scar remains of the second one) doesn't have the characteristic hole, but apparently that's not necessarily a deal breaker. Sometimes the tabs were fitted into leather pockets on the bridle. I would love to hear your considered opinions on this!
    13 points
  26. I was left curled up in the corner in the foetal position sucking my thumb and whimpering, but I'm OK now. Thanks for fixing it, I had to have my morning coffee while reading the news instead of the forum, it's a crazy world we live in.
    13 points
  27. For the most part I agree. However, we that hunt western ghost towns know that in areas that have been undisturbed, nails, coins and other artifacts basically lay right on top of the ground. So a test like Montes nail board has relevance. I can't even count the number of times I've got a signal and looked down to see the edge of a coin or token exposed from a thin layer of dust amongst a bunch of nails. In the case of buried targets at different planes, I agree that air test have no use. In the wild, for the most part I've found that 90% of the targets in iron infested sites will be seen by most modern metal detectors. The best of the best get the remaining 10%. I've taken as many as 6 different metal detectors out at a time to compare countless signals in trashy sites and I think what I've stated above is pretty accurate.
    13 points
  28. The first time I used my new 13"X11" coil was September 7th 2023. Since then the number of silver coins and jewelry that I have found in a period of 21 days at public park turf sites, no beaches, on ground that I have hunted extensively with Deus 2 using the 9" coil is staggering at least for me. I have not hunted all 21 days either. My hunt log shows 12 hunts with Deus 2 using the 13"X11" coil. Here in Colorado, finding lots of silver coins in a public area means getting extremely lucky as in there has been some soil disturbance like installing a new sidewalk, play structure, trees or flower beds in a park. Or a change in detector/coil has achieved more usable target separation and depth. None of these silver items were found in areas with recent soil disturbances. They were all found deep in moderate to high iron mineralized undisturbed for many years dirt between 7" and 10" deep. Some had very iffy but clearly high conductor target responses with some iron responses mixed in. Others were no brainer, has to be a deep high conductor coin or jewelry responses. I have not dug an equal amount of iron trash by the way......maybe 6 or 7 bent nails. I was one of those people that wanted the 9" coil to be sufficient due to its outstanding ergonomics. Clearly at least for my area, it isn't.
    12 points
  29. Using advanced detectors need not be complicated at all. The presets exist for a reason - use them and I don't see why a beginner can't get going, then expand into learning the controls later if they want. Better that than buying a simple detector, then selling it later to upgrade. Surely most people can do this: I have a short Equinox tutorial here
    12 points
  30. This time I was using my ORX metal detector with the 9" round HF coil and had it set to 50 khz and the VDI I got on the earing was 74and it was on edge. The earing is marked 925
    12 points
  31. This is the hottest gold streak I have hit. This is the cleanup results from this past Sunday. Those drop riffles really "ROCK!" I got over 2 grams of flour gold in 4 hours. Unbelievable! I believe it's a record for me.
    12 points
  32. Gold is one of the best tests of character. Some men are very weak and bewitched by the shine and easily bought. The greed is too powerful and they become wolves. Be thankfull you only lost a few grams and it wasnt an ozer patch. Sometimes you can get an idea, or psychological profile, of who you're dealing with just by showing them a nice nugget. Watch carefully every word they say, how they act, what questions they ask. Its interesting and will give you clues into a mans hidden heart.
    12 points
  33. Hi Reece, I don't know if you will find this apropos, but just in case. Picking a partner is, like so much of prospecting, sometimes a matter of luck. This is a true story. Continued good searching... RD and Area 51.pdf
    12 points
  34. I think it is going to be an early winter and my topper leaks, making me get tired of getting into a wet bed. The gold has not been good at the claims this year. Didn't even hit an ounce. I figured I better get out of there before heavier rains and colder temperatures kicked in. Plus I had to deal with a rat eating things under the hood of my truck. I finally dispatched of him with my 10/22 the day before I left. The heat was hot when I got here in late August but I welcomed it gladly. I still hunted til about 4-5 pm most days. Got 7 nuggets so far for a gram total. While I am here I will get leak taken care of on truck topper and continue finding gold til I head for Arizona - Gold Basin/Lost Basin. Seeing the wild Mustangs was awesome! The Mormon cricket in my tent by my bed; not so much. Got first electrum nugget the other day or pretty close to being electrum. Very pale. I have some good videos coming up.
    12 points
  35. We’ve all seen numerous separation tests posted on YouTube and the vast majority that I’ve seen are simply air tests. I've conducted numerous separation tests over the years and one thing is most apparent....at least to me....air testing separation capabilities borders on a waste of time...for the most part. Most recent example; I successfully separated good targets from bad using the Deus II in Beach Sensitive during an air test i.e. targets were exposed on the ground’s surface with approximately 1 inch separation. When I buried those same targets at the same distance, one from the other, at a depth of 3 and 6 inches, NO separation….and this is not unusual. I pretty much ignore air tests of any kind. Why? That's obviously NOT the way we hunt. We detect targets that are buried in sand or soil don't we? I always abide by the Army approach from my day...."Train as you fight." Can you get something out of air testing? Doubtful, maybe, sometimes, but don't take those results to the bank...if you do you'll be sorely disappointed when you apply those same parameters/results to buried targets. Bottom line...for me: Tests that are conducted under the same realistic conditions that we find in the field will be much more reliable than those conducted under artificial conditions such as air tests...no matter how elaborate. I've seen far too many spurious results from tests conducted under artificial conditions. Just the experience from my old foxhole....you may have a different experience.
    11 points
  36. Have not got out for a park hunt for a week or two. Got in a fun one today though. The weather was just so nice. Park wasn't crowded at all. Lots of dig me signals. Just a very pleasant morning. And... Scored two .925 rings, both very plain but pretty chunky with the biggest at 8.85 grams. And... A silver Washington! And a wheatie. And $9.25 in clad. Dug only about half a dozen trash targets. Just being very selective and cherry picking hard. And this is weird. My phone automatically cut out the background. I don't know how to do that on purpose. Weird. - Dave
    11 points
  37. Lucky…since you've hunted the Pinto's…and you mentioned the wind - which reminds me of a quote from another prospector who has passed on, 29Prospector, who said "it's not the heat that get's you out here, it's the wind." Oh yeah. I hope folks don't mind but I have a story partly about the wind in the Pinto's which I"m going to attach. You guys are the only people who understand this kind of writing, so again, hope it's alright. Bob "29Prospector".pdf
    11 points
  38. I've been so crazy busy this summer my gold hunting has taken a hit. Finally the last couple weeks has freed up some time for swinging the Manticore. As you all know, the only coil most of us have is the stock 11" coil, so that's what I've been using. Now that the info has come out (yesterday to us dealers) about the options and the part #'s with prices, I'm starting to get excited for a smaller coil. No, they messed up and will not offer us the small 6" coil, but they are offering an M-8, M-9, and M-15 (or the stock M-11). What do you folks think will be the best coil option for Au nuggets/specimens and does anyone know the different or seen pics of the M-9? That one caught me off guard as I had not seen or heard of such. Below a couple Manticore specimens from this year using stock 11" coil. 1st is a 3.6 gram and 2nd is a 11.8 gram. Notice this piece was broken and likely off a larger section. Need to go back and hunt around there much more to find the bigger chunk.
    11 points
  39. I figured I'd contact Nugget Finder to see what's going on with the other GPX 6000 coils, I quite like my Xceed 12x7" so intend to buy the 8x6" also, I think it'd be a weapon on the 6000. So, to save anyone else wasting Rohan's time replying to endless emails about when the coils will be available, I thought I'd post it here. This was his reply. Hi Simon Releasing the 16x10 is our priority at this stage, I don’t expect to have the 8x6 ready for sale until sometime in 2024. I understand these delays may be frustrating and I appreciate your patience. Regards Rohan Perhaps that means the 16x10" may be released this year, but the little guy is a fair while off yet, a shame as spring/summer (now) is when I do most of my detecting so I'll miss out this season. I'll stick to my GPZ and 8" X-Coil for the most powerful small coil detector for now.
    11 points
  40. Took the plunge and went Deus 2 - simply because I can use my favourite headphones.. Minelab lost me there. I'll keep the Nox, though - great machine which never let me down the past 5 years. The Deus certainly is one quirky machine..! A lot of small details could have been solved better imho.. Charging system, display, menu structure, stem, antenna cabling.. we'll see, how it works out. CF lower shaft is on its way. First outing I felt like a beginner.. dude.. have to get used to the tones and still can't decide, if I stick with PWM or sqaure. Went to the beach ... second target sounded like crap.. 52-53 - I've dug it anyway 🤠 To my surprise a super thin 14k gold ring popped out of the hole - maybe 7-8 inches down. I could't believe it 😅 Additionally I've found 13€ of clad during the 2 hours hunt - not bad, considering a friend of mine found 6€ with his Deus 1 😁
    11 points
  41. Names are made up and people can even use a trusted name from one forum on another forum very easily. The bottom line is pretty simple - trust nobody and only use protected forms of payment. I’m constantly amazed by people that insist on using Friends and Family because they apparently think the insurance has no value. Yeah, it’s just extra money you are paying, UNTIL you get ripped off. Then I promise you will wish you had it. I insist on not using Friends and Family, and will only do business with PayPal address verified accounts. I’ve heard all kinds of excuses about why it’s not needed, or how you can get ripped off anyway, but my company in Alaska specialized in shipping millions of dollars of product worldwide and I never got scammed. I have a finely tuned scam meter and know how to protect myself and using PayPal buyer protection is one of the best things going. Fraud is at all time highs and is everywhere. It’s a huge multi billion dollar enterprise, and if you don’t protect yourself it’s only a matter of time before you get hit. Buyer beware. Here is where the guy introduced himself. Even it raises red flags with me. An introduction that’s no introduction at all, clearly done just to satisfy the forum minimum.
    10 points
  42. presentado recientemente en Detectival New Nokta products launched at Detectival. New Nokta Score. The Nokta Double Score and the Nokta Accu point pin pointer.
    10 points
  43. Went back to that rich flour gold patch today and again got a substantial amount of flour gold from the North Saskatchewan River. Today's amount was 1.9g for a 4 hour gig. So, that makes a total of four grams of gold during my last 2 trips (totaling 8 hours).
    10 points
  44. This post is in response to Chase's request that I test out magnetic reject/accept on the D2 in Beach Sensitive mode. It's the only program I use, heavily modified. Hit my larger local beach today, great day for detecting. Didn't get there too early and it really didn't matter being Wednesday and I was the only one detecting. I had low expectations but did manage to get there at low tide. Took one for the team wearing sandals so I could go in the water and see if the program "howled" or acted odd in the water. This beach has lots of sharp pebbles that are a nightmare for an old geezer with a touch of foot neuropathy. There were lots of tiny jellyfish but I didn't get stung, just prayed one wouldn't get caught in my sandal. Remember I'm not an expert by any means, but I do get out a lot and there's a small motel here but it's not a Holiday Inn Express. 😏 First thing I noticed is they may have tweaked up IDs because Zincolns are 84-85 again. They were coming in at 82-83 in V1.1 which I kinda liked. I didn't find any memorials this trip so I don't know if they are still hitting 90. Dimes are still 88-90 and quarters 90-94, nickels are still 61-62. 👍 The first target I dug was a Zincoln that was over 10" deep. The 13" coil hits stuff really deep, I sometimes joke with the other detectorists saying I'm there to find the stuff they missed, it's kinda not a joke. 🙄 I had the magnetic setting on accept at first, which is my go to setting. No difference at all in the water, and pretty quiet on dry sand. It blips a little but it's not any different than V1.1. Hits hard on iron and anything else, it's like it sees past the minerals. Turn it to "Reject", and lots of stuff disappears. All in all the D2 performed flawlessly, I even turned sensitivity down to 87 and still it hit hard on deep targets with a lot less iron wrap. I got a lot of fresh drops today but there were plenty of deep targets, and water hunting was the same as it has been. Just a tiny bit of trash, the dinosaur holding the gold pull tab was an inside joke with my buddies. 😀 I ended up with 2 dinosaurs for the day, the tiny one may be silver: And as usual I find some sort of relic near these palm trees where I've found some old coins and other stuff: This 1940s-50s Washington DC token. Not a bad day at all. Some things "feel" a bit different, but another thing I noticed is that not once did my pinpointer fail to connect. Overall this is a small step forward for me and I'm glad I updated. 👍
    10 points
  45. jasong, that reference sounds like the 23.5 oz found by Richard Bailey; hence, the nick name (2 lb Dick) found in the Eugene Mts in June of '99. He was the tire man at Burns during that time period and a friend of Jim Straight. Dick gave me the attached photo of the nugget which he said he found with a Whites VLF at about 8 inches deep. Lots of big gold found in that general area back in the day: T-Bone 27 .5 oz, Okie Jim Malone 40 oz, AZ Nugget Bob, etc etc.
    10 points
  46. Hi Alain, I can only speak for what has been done to improve the overall sensitivity to small low conductor targets using FMF Goldfield. That was my main complaint that I have been corresponding about with XP. All along, I have believed that XP deliberately setup the FMF modes to be less sensitive to small non-ferrous trash that has a target ID of 25 to 40 or so. It is a good thing for some types of hunting environments. It is not good for gold nugget prospecting or micro jewelry hunting. It may also not be very good for larger, heavily masked or poorly oriented non ferrous targets either depending on their depth. If XP also improved the sensitivity to small low conductors or small targets in the .5 gram or less range for any other Deus 2 programs via the version 2.0 software update, I have no clue. However, since you asked the question, I did a very quick air test on three 0.5 gram and smaller low conductors using all 14 of the V2.0 stock modes with the 9" coil. The only adjustment I made was to turn OFF the low conductor notch in #5 Park mode. I was not paying any attention to target IDs in this test. I was just interested in the distance that I could hear audible (by my ears) two way repeatable responses. Here are the results........ Again, this was an air test in low EMI. Expect the results to be slightly less in low iron mineralization and significantly less in higher mineralization. From memory, the only change from V1.10 to V2.0 that I can see is with FMF Goldfield. Maybe others will have a different opinion. I didn't realize that the max frequency can be changed on the FMF modes Park, Deep HC and Relic to 40 kHz. It didn't help much in a different air test I did, but it is neat. For the gold nugget hunters (and micro jewelry land hunters) reading this, if you are using version 1.10 software, #14 Fast 40 is the quick and easy mode to use if your ground can handle single frequency operation and the stock reactivity and audio response settings. Just lower the discrimination setting well below 0 if you can and maybe change the tone setting to Pitch. Steve H. and others like me have been saying this for some time. Also, modes like FMF Goldfield and Relic can be operated as 2-tone ferrous/non-ferrous VCO by turning on Disc IAR.
    10 points
  47. Also just from a historic curiosity perspective, if any dredgers are still around from the Golddredger.com forum days, this is the operation where all the large washplant equipment came from which Leonard (Golden Optimist) created a whole dedicated sale page for on his forum and it took years to sell that massive pile of equipment off IIRC. If anyone ever wondered why there was like a million $ worth of placer equipment sitting in Wyoming, here's where it came from (it was trucked from my NV land to WY). There is an old sign from the Burns Bros truck stop coffee shop laying there, which my understanding was the meeting spot for the old timer detectorists back in the 80's/90's, and they brought it out here and hung it up when it closed, it got left behind when the plant moved. Some of these Wyoming/Colorado guys were suction dredging the washplant tailing ponds out there too haha. I have a photo of it somewhere. *edit, found it: *Here, the land is in the background behind the trees I think, I guess their plant was also on BLM land by the trees (I'm not exactly clear on where everything was)? Eugene Mtns in the background (Lunker Hill, just off to the right of the photo I think), Rye Patch and reservoir to the left. *hydrocyclones they had after the jig circuit, it was quite an operation Oddly and coincidentally, I never knew these RPM people, but they were also from Wyoming. And in a strange turn of events, I (also from Wyoming) ended up owning the same land in Nevada after the owner passed away, despite there being very few prospectors actually from here, relatively speaking compared to other states. Jim Straight gave me some info about detecting in the area back in the 80's and 90's, but I can't seem to find the emails anymore. It was all smaller VLF type gold though, picker type nuggets and smaller. Some colorful names now passed on worked back up there, "6lb Dick" comes to mind. (I may have gotten the poundage wrong), can't remember if it was a single nugget weight he found or a pocket, or what. 😅 Anyways, lots to explore with an ATV from there, I found a ton of old coyote hole drift mines further back on different RPM land (now sold), but some operation out of Vegas came through and destroyed them with an excavator and the scrappers staying at the Imlay RV place stole all the old handbuilt antique placer equipment back in the sub canyons like 2015 or so. Anyways, interesting area historically, those are the tidbits I know. There is also some morbid stuff tangentially nearby, but I'm sure people familiar with the area already know those stories. You could make a movie out of the history of the whole general area 20 mile radius.
    10 points
  48. Any time that I might be in an area with snakes I always wear boots and gaiters, When I am around a lot of sticky thorns and cacti, I always wear long sleeves and jeans with my boots. When I am along the Gulf near alligators I have 2 things I take with me and that is first a friend, and the second is a gun to shoot my friend to make the gator leave me alone. That seems to work very well but I am running out of friends. Would you like to go detecting with me?
    10 points
  49. We finally got some decent rain & a bit cooler weather. I had not been out much as the ground conditions made for very hard digging. I took my still new to me MXT to one of my favorite red dirt relic sites to see what it could find behind the other machines I have used there. This site is along one of the oldest roads in our area, near a Republic of Texas era stockade close to a nice flowing creek. The old fort area was used as a staging/camp ground from Republic days through the Civil War. Also located near by is the homesite of a Confederate Cabinet member. Unfortunately, for all of the concentrated historical activity, much of that area has been developed & built over, with only smaller areas left relatively undisturbed. The MXT with 9" Ultimate coil ran very well in Relic mode with Disc set just below 2 and Gain at pre set 9. There is a LOT of Iron in the ground of all sizes though I have dug most of the big pieces. There was a tenant house on the site also up to 1905 or so. This site was virgin ground when I first gained permission so I have been able to find a wide variety of items, many going back to the earliest days of local settlement. Good Non ferrous targets have started getting thin but there is still history to be found hiding in the nails. I am always pleasantly surprised how each detector sees the ground & targets with a slightly different point of view. In addition to that pictured below was some fired .45 cal Round Balls, Camp Lead, and odd Brass pieces. The general service Eagle coat button is Back marked Steele & Johnson Mfgco. The only button reference material I have dates it 1875-1920, which may or may not be absolute. I agree that it is post War and speculate it is from the occupation troops the were stationed in each County seat during "Reconstruction". Perhaps they were camped out to keep an eye on the old Postmaster. It cleaned up to be in excellent condition using Navel jelly. A special find for me, given my area. The Wheat Cent is in almost AU condition as far as wear. The Brass items show the attention to detail that used to be common in the manufacture of everyday items. I guess the zipper pull is a very early example.
    9 points
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