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  1. Dang, is it September already? I didn’t even work my little Claim this season! All the easy gold has been gone for a couple years now, and since I’m looking at a Hip Replacement in the near future (old car wreck injury), it wasn’t worth the flare ups that come from hauling rocks, swinging a pick, and shoveling to get at the remaining gold. So I’ve focused on fitness and biking the hills this summer, with a couple fun detecting trips to Nv to keep me in the game….but the next trip isn’t for a couple weeks and I need a Gold Fix! So I decided that after my early morning walk, it would be time to go play with the Gold Monster😊 It was a brisk start to the day! My hummingbird feeder was starting to freeze; most have left, but I leave it out for the stragglers. While on my walk and planning where I’d go with the Monster, I couldn’t help but admire the beautiful sunrise….unfortunately due to the awful California wildfires😥. Then I saw the neighborhood Mama Moose….her Baby was with her, but I didn’t catch the young one in the pic. I sure do love my morning walks up here! Once it warmed up a bit, the Pup and I headed out in the side x side to an area I’ve hit quite a bit before with the Monster, but I was sure it could squeak out a couple more. Lila, of course, wanted to drive😄. I worked real slow, and sure enough, was able to find some little bits. And LITTLE being the key word here…check out this tiny speck. Unbelievable that a detector can pick this up! Here’s one of the larger bits found…can actually pose it on the detector lol! All the while, my little Pup was protecting me from the chipmunks scurrying amongst the Old Timer’s rock piles…what a cutie 🥰 We spent several hours enjoying the late summer sun, the gentle babbling of the nearby creek, the breeze in the pines, and the solitude and contentment only Nature can bring. And I ended up with enough bits to actually weigh…what a great day!👍😊
    38 points
  2. We had a 3 party hunt scheduled Condor, LuckyLarry and myself. I set sail East Bound and down on I-80 to Rye Patch from Reno. I texted the Boyz and received a text back from Condor that his Truck was sick and couldn’t make this trip! Well just meant more Rib Eyes on my dinner plate! LuckyLarry, was on his way from Elko to Rye Patch and the timing was perfect he followed me in to our camp site! Temperature Gauge was a solid 97 at the 3 O’Clock hour. Larry, hunted out here in the Hey Days of Rye Patch. He was just learning Gold Detecting back then and scored many nice nuggets! But, ended up being a Top Notch Relic Hunter. That’s how we met. We met on the Internet with me needing some old Relic’s ID. He was my go to guy to tell me the history of anything I’d dig up in the Goldfields of California. Of course, I avoided these extra trashy old camp sites and would pass the location to Larry for his Relic hunts when he traveled to California. We set up camp and hopped into my RZR Buggy into the heat to swing our 6000’s on my old patches. Finding left over nuggets that our older models missed, but the heat! Had to hit a 100 before some clouds moved in to cool things down! Them clouds had rain and in front of them was the wind. Headed back to Camp to beat the rain, as I left my Trucks Windows half open which was the way the wind and rain was blowing in. Made it back to camp wet Windows up with a gust of wind that had to be over 50 mph. Well early to bed with showers on and off and the next morning with more rain to heavy to detect in which gave us time to eat some cookies and for me to remember where some more old patches where at to swing on. Gone for 4-Days with 2 1/2 days of good detecting! We ended up with 20 Dinks each! Two Lucky 🍀 guys with plenty of smiles for our efforts fighting Mother Natures last blasts of Summer! I figure I’m now about 80% done with having the 6000 over our old patches in Rye Patch. I’m sure we left gold in the patches we hunted for further visits…never can get them all and every day is a different day! Until the next Hunt! LuckyLundy
    33 points
  3. Sourdough Scott and I have been detecting hillside that has never been mined before and doing quite well with finding gold. It confounded us both as to why this location was left untouched by the early miners. When I discovered the answer it sent chills down my spine. I hate it when I start finding a lot of gold in a small area because that means I have to dig all the trash even when I know it's a tin can, shovel head, copper still, or a locomotive and I am basically a very lazy prospector. To make matters worse this spot must have been where the 1927 world champion squirrel hunting competition took place as there is an extraordinary quantity of lead and brass. There are also bits of steel cable, nuts and bolts, Caterpillar parts and hobnails from numerous logging operations which occurred there through the years. One bit of trash that caught my attention was a pristine 50 caliber musket ball as they sound exactly like a large gold nugget. I put it in my pocket and continued on. Then, not far away, I found the remains of an ancient musket. I knew this had the makings of a Detector Prospector story so I took the ball and musket home for some forensic research. Here are the horrifying results of my research findings. Upon microscopic examination of the musket ball I discovered a minute speck of fossilized blood. By using the DNA identification app on my smarty pants phone I discovered it was blood from the much feared Plumas Mammoth Grizzly! I then began analysis of the musket. By getting my 51 caliber finger stuck in the 50 caliber barrel I was able to conclude beyond any doubt that the musket was the very one that fired the bloody ball. I then closely examined the musket exterior and made three shocking discoveries! One was a patch of dried blood that proved to be from a human male of about forty years of age, dating from 1852. The next was another bloodstain that matched that which was found on the musket ball, identified as being from a Plumas Mammoth Grizzly. The third discovery (and this is where it gets scary) were bite marks which by careful measurement proved to be that of a grizzly over 11 feet tall and weighing nearly a ton! The only logical conclusion from my research is that the doomed prospector discovered the same rich deposit that Sourdough Scott and I found, became distracted with finding gold and not paying attention to his surroundings, mortally wounding the grizzly when he was attacked by surprise but was disassembled by the grizzly before it succumbed from it's wound. That is why this rich strike has remained unworked for 169 years.
    32 points
  4. really hard hunt. got in the wash at 6am very few targets over the first 1/2 mile. on some bedrock i got a bit of a waver in the threshold, after moving it i could tell it was small. i called my friend over to recover it with the monster, so i could keep moving. it was about a 1 grain bit. it was about 930 and it was starting to look like a skunk day. started moving very slow maxed out on manual with the threshold wavering i got a repeatable signal that i would have missed without headphones on. got down to 6 inches in the crack and it got loud. flipped the coil to slide in to the crack and it got really loud. 2 more inches and it was out. very nice 9 grain nugget. stuck the coil back in the crack and there was another target a nice 7 grain nugget. after that i found 2 more small ones and my friend got a few small bits with the monster. over all a nice day. 19 grains or like 1.2 grams im saying 8 inches, but it might have been a bit deeper. my scoop is about 12 inches, see pic.
    30 points
  5. Excalibur Rules! Summer season is now over, took me a few hunts in June to find a decent spot but It's been giving every since, 13 straight hunts with gold. July 3rd to Sept 4th ..........Summer gold count 30, 27 Gold rings, 3 misc. Gold (174 grams)....130 Silvers, mostly coins.......the July 3rd gold was with the AQ..which is setting for right now ...... due to the amount of time I can get out and hunt, the AQ requires a lot more work when hunting and the excalibur fits the one spot perfect and finds gold...... Kind of Funny, I posted this on a Excalibur Facebook Page and Got a over whelming response, and had a few, I guess who had never seen a Class ring and a few thought they were fake rings? Anyway all worked out, had to delete a couple of the post to keep the peace. Come on Fall! And the Silver..as bad as it gets..bay is terrible on it.
    30 points
  6. We've been in a bit of a Covid lock-down recently and during that time my Garrett 24k arrived so I wasn't able to use it in the gold fields straight away, it was quite painful to look at it knowing I can't go and use it, fortunately we came out of our lock-down and as took off for a prospect with the 24k as soon as I could. I ordered a White's 6" concentric coil for it to tie me over until Garrett and with any luck Nel come out with other coils for it, I hope they continue with the 6" Concentric as I'll buy a Garrett 6" Concentric as soon as they release it. It's a remarkably sensitive coil, I expected it to be less sensitive than it is as it's quite big however it surprised me and matches or exceeds smaller coils on other high frequency gold detectors. I've always been happy with Garrett coil quality so upgrading the Whites to a Garrett would be worthwhile I think. In saying that, neither the 10x6" Garrett coil or the Whites 6" coil were at all bump sensitive, not one bump noise the entire day. I'm so used to coil bump sensitivity from the Equinox and Gold Monster it was a rather pleasurable experience being able to scrub the coil on the ground like mad and bump it around not setting off the detector, giving me a distinct advantage over using bump sensitive coils. I started the day using the 10x6" Coil as I wanted to see how it goes and I was going back to a spot I'd found a fair few grams of gold in the past, about 30 or more nuggets using the scrape and detect method taking off layers of soil at a time and detecting it. The initial nugget which was just under half a gram and a fair few more were found using my GPZ including a 4.2 gram nugget and then I brought in the Equinox with 6" coil to clean up as a majority of the nuggets were very small and the VLF's tend to do better cleaning up these very small nuggets. I'd even gone over this little scrape and detect area with the Gold Bug 2 however it was a bit of a nightmare as the area is absolutely full of hot rocks and the Gold Bug 2 in heavy hot rocks isn't a good detector in my opinion, it's too busy making it's response noise to the hot rocks to worry about the bits of gold next to the hot rocks so you miss nuggets if they're near hot rocks. The problem is this spot is loaded with hot rocks all through the soil of various shapes and sizes mostly a green type of schist that is all crumbly and broken up and detectors love to sound off on it. It's likely there from the old timers, it's basically some old workings where the old timers left their rock pile in a little gully, and right on the lower downhill side of the rock pile was my little scrape and detect patch. Even the GPZ struggled with all of the hot rocks so I was quite pleased how the 24k was coping with them, sure it was sounding off on some of them too but it wasn't too troublesome and seemed to ignore the little broken up bits and very usable. I ran the 24k with the sensitivity maxed out, Sat on the middle setting and audio on Boost 2. The ground balance was quick and easy then I switched into the Locked balance mode. If the broken up schist bits of hot rock were too severe I left it in tracking which helped to knock them out. I gave the 6" Concentric coil a quick try and it struggled more with the hot rocks and i didn't want to lower my sensitivity down so I reverted back to the DD which appeared to handle them better and is still remarkably sensitive. So I just started scraping back layers and detecting taking about 2 inches off at a time knowing the gold here is likely going to be very small and it will be stuff I've missed in the past as I've scraped this spot out before and back filled it so I was essentially checking the same soil all over again for anything I missed. I had high hopes I had missed some as all it would take is a small hot rock to be sitting on top of the bit of gold the previous time and I'd likely miss it or just the bit of gold on it's side being a very thin one or any number of reasons, even just at a depth too deep for the size of gold with the detector I was using. It wasn't long and I had my first piece. Quite a decent size one too, I was baffled at the time why I'd missed this one in the past. The 24k had now found it's first gold, highly likely the first piece of gold found in New Zealand with the Garrett 24k, a badge I'll wear proudly. 🙂 Next up was a reasonably faint but very repeatable signal with no target ID showing, I delicately used my scoop to scrape soil away knowing this was likely a very small bit of gold and it sure was... my smallest bit of the day too and surprised I managed to find it with the 10x6" coil, I don't recall ever finding a bit this small using the 10x5" type size on other detectors. Can you spot it? 🙂 There it is! 0.007 of a gram, not bad for the 10x6" coil, especially in this hot rock infested ground. I always check targets in case they're odd little bits of metal with my pick magnet, and you'll see it was quick to build up black sand, this soil has plenty of it in it. I kept scraping down layers and found another. Quite small too... but a bit more meat on it than the previous one 🙂 I'd had enough of the scrape and detect spot by now and wanted to go explore a bit to see how the 24k performed for general detecting so I walked for about 10 minutes to another spot I'd found some gold in the past and detected for about an hour digging plenty of shotgun pellets, completely normal in this area as there is a rabbit plague that causes countless thousands of shotgun pellets to be distributed all over the place for me to clean up 🙂 I didn't have high hopes as myself and a friend (JW) have absolutely thrashed this area but it's always possible to miss gold when there is so many pellets. We generally scrape a few times and if the signal persists dig it, if it moves after the first scrapes ignore it thinking it's very likely a pellet. A few pictures of the sort of terrain I was detecting. My batteries went down to 2 bars quite quickly, within an hour. I assume as they're rechargeable and run at 1.2 volts instead of 1.5 volts for standard AA's but it stayed at the two bars for the entire day so still plenty of life left in them yet by the looks of it. Pretty wild rocky terrain and only really suitable for smaller coils. The GPZ with it's stock coil is terrible here, the smaller the coil the better in general. I did manage to find a piece though, after a lot of pellet digs 🙂 Not a bad size bit for the area too I now decided I'd put the Whites 6" Concentric coil on and give it another go as this area doesn't have near as many hot rocks as my scrape and detect spot. I found a bit of raised bedrock and had a signal that persisted down into the schist. At this point it almost had to be gold so I started filming. And it was gold 🙂 I had to break up the schist to get it out. A nice little piece too, a roundish flat one. This area has plenty of black sand too, this was my pick after checking that bedrock in case it was a steel shotgun pellet. It was getting near time to go get some dinner and I was pretty satisfied to even get one nugget in this area but I kept going a little while longer and it paid off. I like the bulls eye sight on the 6" coil, it really is the hot spot too, great for pinpointing. I had a signal that persisted down into the gravels on the bedrock. And got this one! It's hard to tell the depth in the photo but it was a reasonable depth. A few inches anyway. And that was it for the day, I was starving! So, do I like the 24K? You're damn right I do, it certainly exceeded my expectations and will now be my primary VLF gold detector replacing my Equinox which replaced my Gold Monster, and the Gold Bug 2 was just not for me, I didn't gel with it at all especially with the masking from hot rocks. I look forward to getting more coils for the 24k, especially smaller ones, and judging by how well it handled the hot rocks I wouldn't mind a larger size coil for ground coverage too. The total for the day. Very happy with the results.
    29 points
  7. Hello Friends, My Oldie finds have been building up for the past month or two, so I decided to make another post. All of these finds were with my Nox 800 from around 10 different parks in my locale. These parks have been detected by numerous hunters around me many dozens of times over the years. I’ve been detecting them for close to 15 years now. All the parks are very trashy, and most times my hunting protocol is to pick thru the the trash and dig the deeper, higher conductive targets, in addition to digging all quarter signals regardless of depth. I’ve hunted these parks so many times, I know the depths of the oldie targets, which range from 6-9+”. I’ll also dig the occasional nickel signal. I have some hunt buddies that prefer digging all clad signals regardless of depth, but that hasn’t been my style of hunting for decades now. It has been a very hot and dry summer in my area (dryer this year than previous years), and I have limited my hunts to just a few hours at a time. It works for me because I can’t stay away from home too long anyways since I take care of my Dad (preparing his meals and medications daily). Thanks for looking! Good luck on your next hunt! Raphis Dan
    27 points
  8. I wanted to share some pics of my last hunt with the GPX-6000 as it was fun to dig a little bigger and deeper gold. This site was much different than my previous 2 gold hunts (Success in Dakota & Wyoming) as it produced quite a few hot rocks for a PI detector. Now yes I can easily spend the time to do the "lift coil as I swing across signal and listen to how fast the signal target dissipates" method (I'll post it later) or I can easily change the multiple of Settings on the GPX-6000 (very confusing detector)🤔 with the 2 timings (Normal or Difficult). Anyway, I pushed the pad on the LDC screen to DIFF and the hot rocks where gone. Pretty easy there. I ran SENS/GAIN at 10 -which is MAX and had THRESHOLD on. After about 20+ small lead birdshots (this detector is a birdshot king), I get a little stronger-slightly more broad of a signal. It immediately sparks my interest as it's a big different than the lead pellets. I book scrape the 1st inch and target is still there, boot another almost inch and still there. Now I pull the pick and take another 1 1/2" off and now am actually into what I consider virgin layer. Quick swing and yet the target comes through very easily. So as to make sure I catch it on video, I hike back to my wheels and grab the cell phone and another water. Trying to dig with an APEX (best pick on the market in my opinion) in 1 hand and the cell phone in the other, while trying to keep the phone on the hole is harder than you might think. Probably why so many people don't catch as many live digs, as you really do need a 2nd person to get the quality. Well no quality here, but I hope the video shows it? After a few digs, swing, digs swing t test and digs, I finally get the target out of the hole. I'm really excited at this time and just so sure I have my 1st really nice 1/2" nugget. The depth of the hole was approx 8" deep, maybe 10", but it was not the 12" I had said in the video as I thought a water bottle was 12" and afterwards my tape showed it to be 8". But I know the detector easily heard the signal 2 to 4 " above the target before I started digging. This piece of gold is not a solid 4.5 grammer, but is mostly gold on the one side and host rock on the bottom. A dense solid nugget of 4.5 grams should easily be able to respond much deeper as I have done it on many older SD/GP and GPX detectors. Hope you folks much success this Fall with your detecting adventures and I look forward to seeing your heavy yellow metal digs.
    27 points
  9. Here are some recent finds using the the Minelab GPX 6000 with the 11” monoloop coil and the Gold Monster 1000 to finish the job. What was impressive to me was how small and rough/reefy/prickly/spongy were the pieces. The location was on an extensively worked, old club claim likely pounded by every previous detector. I collected very little trash. In a half day of work, there were only two pieces of bird shot, 3 pieces of rusted iron flake, 3 bits of aluminum, and many small hot rocks found. The small hot rocks were picked up when trying to localize the targets with the Gold Monster. Only a couple larger hot rocks were heard by the GPX. This would have been different if there were much ironstone. So far, it has seemed to me that the new GPX really prefers the signal from rounded gold. Nevertheless, it was able to sniff out these very rough pieces even at sub-grain weights. They were mostly only ghost-like deviations in the threshold betwixt the warbles. (You know the kind of change that is so subtle that only your subconscious brain picks up on, but then when you focus with your conscious brain you’re not really sure, so you decide to dig anyway.) I was pushing both the machine and my attention pretty hard. This is the same area I’ve previously mentioned that causes a lot it EMI for the 6000 due to heavy overhead air traffic. The settings were Auto 2, either Normal or Difficult ground, and with the threshold on. The two largest pieces are just over 2 grains each. The rest were less than a grain each. Impressive machine.
    27 points
  10. From a ground murmur to a waahhh ... around 7 inches deep 🤗
    25 points
  11. Is that title click bait or what! LOL After 4 years of talking about it, Gerry finally comes to South Dakota! Yes I am "Brian" in Gerry's Part 1 post. It all started in 2018, at that time, I had been detecting for 4-5 years learning on my own along with a one-day lesson from Gary Drayton (before Oak Island) during my first year. I was well versed in book smarts and had done a bunch of research but never received formal instruction on gold detecting. See I was spoiled, my first nugget ever detecting was a ¼ ozT beauty on the first day and I thought they all were all going come like that. Nope LOL. I decided that it was time for formal instruction on metal detecting and had reached out to Gerry at Gerry’s Metal Detectors and signed up for one of his 3-day courses. Gerry’s lessons, along with his quality fellow instructors was priceless! It was during those lessons Gerry asked where everyone was from. When it came to me, I said South Dakota. I remember very vividly him saying. “Brian doesn’t know it yet, but he is going to invite me to SD because I have yet to detect gold there.” Or something like that. We all laughed but that stuck with me. A year later I called and said let’s put that trip on hold for a year as I was getting married and had a lot going on. The next year we had planned very tentatively, but Covid hit. Finally, after 4 years, the trip was established. Now, the hard part was to figure out where to put Gerry on some gold. I mean I had a hard enough time putting myself on the gold and this would be the first time I have ever invited someone to come detect. I was a little nervous that Gerry would come out on over a 2 day - 1000+ mile drive, 5-day trip and not find a thing! We all know gold is never a guarantee but, c’mon this is the first time I have ever invited someone to come out and detect and I wanted to impress somewhat. 😊 When it got closer he said that he was hopeful to have a 6k with him, and when it was a couple weeks out, we knew we would have at least one. My friend “Dan” was on the early list and Gerry would bring his out – hand delivered. Not until about Gerry being 6 hours away did he spill the beans and said he had one for me too. I was on a later list and just before he was about to leave, a shipment arrived. He knew that I would want this, even though I was acting like a doubting Thomas. I needed to put my fingers in the nail holes of Jesus’s hands to believe. I needed to see the Zed up against the 6k. Sure enough I did. Gerry explained it all in his post. 11 nuggets left behind in the first patch. Then I got to hold it and wow, Idaho Peg explains that really well in her post too LOL. It was being set free. Now like Gerry said, the ground on that patch was very saturated, wet down almost a foot. That patch is never like that, it was so humid it felt like being in FL. Very uncharacteristic. Power lines 250’ away. And he still pulled out 11 nuggets. I grided that patch 3 times with the Zed using 3 different settings for the ground I was on, ranging from a high sensitivity setting to a smoother threshold setting to a deep target setting. I was confident that that patch was worked out. Gerry uses a 6k and gets out 11 more nuggets. We ran the Zed over quite a few of Gerry’s targets with different settings and nothing. It would not have stopped me and obviously it didn’t. Would it have stopped me using the 6k, you bet. Very clear signal even through the SDC like threshold. That patch also had an SDC2300, Equinox 800 with 10 x 5 coil and a Gold Bug 2 ran over it as well, still 11 nuggets left behind. To me, seeing the GPX work in real life was what was needed for me to believe. It is hard to explain everything on a forum, but having Gerry stay with us for 5 days was in itself a 5 day personal lesson. We were able to talk freely, bounce ideas, theories, scenarios, ground conditions, you name it! It was so much fun, so informing and the most important we had a ton ‘o’ fun. I won’t tell you how my wife and I spoiled Gerry on this trip (let’s just say no one went hungry LOL), but we tried to give him the best South Dakota hospitality that we could. I wanted this to be a trip to remember and hopefully something that he would want to come back to. We took Gerry to 4 different spots overall and we had a success rate of 75% gold found. On the last day that we went detecting, I made the plunge and opted for the 6k. We went to a “new” area that that the SDC and the Gold Bug found a piece each in only 2 hrs of a recon detecting trip. By the end of a 5-hour session we had a new patch, “The Six Patch.” I added 3 more pieces as seen in Gerry’s post. Gerry I just want to say that we had a blast! It was so much fun, extremely entertaining 😉, and an overall great time! We forgot to take a group pic so you are definitely gonna need to come back! Now the rest of the story…….. So Day One on the 6k and I find gold. I am now so excited to start going over old patches and see what we missed. Well I can honestly say this--I have found gold every day I have used the 6k since owning it. Now granted it is only 6 outings, but that is 5-6 weeks of detecting for me. I have a job, I can only go out detecting on weekends and usually it is just one day on the weekend. So if I get skunked at least 4 times in a row that is a month of no gold and months are limited up here. So not only do we need to do massive amounts of research, you also better be using the best equipment you can as well and you better know how to use it properly. My Dad always told me “The poor man pays twice.” You can interpret that how you would like, but to me if you don’t get the best you’re going to end up paying for it in the end anyways (repairs, upgrades, etc.). So for me, when the 6k came out, I had to know I was making the right decision. Two reasons: 1.) I have a Zed, it is still considered the flagship detector, do I NEED a 6k or can my Zed do the job. 2.) If I want a 6k, the Zed had to go, because of my financial positioning, I must sell in order to “upgrade.” So I researched, read all I could and watched. For me though in the end, I really had to see it in person, I had to touch it, I had to use it. I mean if it was as mind blowing as the Zed was when it came out, I think it would have been a no brainer. In my research one of the things that really stood out to me was the star chart, believe it or not. Doc kind of opened my eyes to it analytically and with a combination of Nugget Heads statistics videos and seeing it in person replicating the same analytics, it was like a eureka moment. It finally made sense. See everything that Steve and JP told us about the detector was accurate, right on the money. I believed them, but doubted them as well for some reason, I needed to somehow verify this for myself. It is just my personality and I also learned some personal lessons along the way and also apologies had to be made. In the end the 6k is by far the best detector for me, it made sense to me, it works the way I want it too and it finds the gold just like it says it does. So onto Day 2 with the 6k, I go back to the patch Gerry covered, Memorial Day Patch. I grid it nice and slow, he was nice enough to leave 3 behind for me 😊. One of them was a nice 0.5g piece but I blame “Dan” and Gerry for leaving me this one. It was by a rake “Dan” had used for his Gold Bug. Nobody moved it LOL. It was hiding that nice nugget but go figure the other detectors did not hear that before the rake was there. I can’t explain it other than the 6k heard it and the others did not (matches the star chart BTW). None of the targets were super deep, about 4-5 inches. Day 3 with the 6k, I go back to Stank Patch. It was overgrown so this one will need much better covering in the fall or early spring, but in 3 hours I pulled out two pieces that I missed that again had an SDC2300, Gold Bug 2 and a Zed over. Depth on those two were at 6.” Day 4 with the 6k, I go to the E Patch. Lots of garbage at this patch so I go to the top and BOOM, hit 7 pieces to 3 pieces of garbage. This was one of our first patches. It has been hit a lot with again the SDC2300, GB2 and the GPZ. That was a fun 4 hours. Day 5 with the 6k, I go back to the E Patch. I continue down and again another 7-piece day, more garbage this time and the garbage that I am picking up are flakes of rust 12” down. 14 pieces now, it just tripled the amount of nuggets on this patch. I will let “Dan” fill in his story here LOL. Day 6 with the 6k, I go back again to the E Patch. Working a little further down found two more pieces in less than 3 hours with my wife. I love when we go together, it is such a…..joy. Just kidding. She likes to do some of the work but if you remember that video of the kid I posted a while back. Yeah it is kind of like that LOL. So here are my thoughts on the 6k: Overall I absolutely love this machine. We all know how awesome the ergonomics are. One arm, no harness, detect all day. Matter of fact I have had to relearn coil control all over again because of this being so light. I was swinging way to fast! LOL. At first I was racing all over the place, the Zed was so heavy and cumbersome that it MADE you go slow, not with the 6k. Most of the time I was running Auto+ in Normal with Threshold on. I would test my targets in Difficult and also had no problem hearing them. Only once did Normal give a signal that Difficult did not hear and it was a rust flake about a foot deep. Like Gerry noted, if you hear a signal in Normal and switch over to Difficult and there is nothing there, switch back to Normal and that signal tends to breakdown and disappear. We found this to usually be ground noise or iron rich ground pockets. I would always give these a boot scrape and double check. As of now, I play the odds. If the signal is still there when switching back to normal, I dig. If not, I move on. The cam locks I think are a huge upgrade compared to what we used to see, they have been remodeled and I crank down on them extremely hard. It is pretty hard to break carbon fiber. The shaft might flex but it does not wobble, I only notice the flex if you swing the thing like a golf club. Regarding EMI, it is there sometimes, but I “grew up” with the SDC2300 and to me the threshold/EMI is smoother. We were even detecting by power lines and when you got to about 250’ from them you had to stop. Haven’t tried the DD coil yet. Matter of fact the EMI saved me from a massive thunderstorm that hit just as I got back to the truck LOL. I only run the external speaker and usually at 1 or 2 so that might help and I also extend my coil to the max (just the way I like it), so that might help too. I did notice that if I have my phone on and sometimes my Garmin inReach that I would get some EMI, so I just turned them off completely and did not have problems after. Breaks in the threshold are very clear so you just need to “listen through” the chatter, but like I said I learned this a long time ago with the SDC. In regards to depth, I have found 0.03 g pieces with a max depth of 4 inches, a flake of rust at 12 inches. Overall the average of the pieces are 0.15 g at an overall average depth of 7 inches. I have not found a 2-foot-deep nugget yet, but never have with my Zed either. Most of all of my multi-gram nuggets were found between 6-8 inches so I have no concern about the 6k not picking them up and since I believe in the analytics of the star chart I am confident that the 6k will pick up the big deep nuggets 4 out of 5 times vs the Zed. I have no problem in that trade off vs everything else that the 6k offers. But for me here is the best thing, instant out the door detecting. Charge one battery the night before, grab your detector, pick, scoop and finds bottle and away you go. Less than 15 minutes and I am out the door. Before I had to grab a harness, grab a WM12, obviously grab the heavy detector, make sure both of them are charged, grab a bungy, make sure I have all the parts to the harness, grab a ferrite, etc. Then when I got there, I had to gear all up, no more. Out of the truck and detecting in minutes. Oh, and for the long hikes in, this is awesome as well, beats the SDC at this as well. With a small Camelbak on my back, I have my lunch and water, scoop and finds bottle. Put the pick in one hand and I collapse the detector shaft down all the way, turn the coil vertical and hold on to the detector like you are detecting. It just becomes a part of your arm then and makes hiking in way easier than carrying it the old-fashioned way. Matter of fact it is kind of off balance if you carry it the old-fashioned way. Now I do have a couple cons as with any detector: The main one being where the coil attaches to the unit, it is plastic, that seems like an easy breaking point to me. Gerry said they always used to be metal. So do take care not to grab there when grabbing the shaft at that spot. Also, it is so sensitive that it goes off really easy now on my wife’s metal hip. She used to like helping me, especially the scoop part. She can’t get close to the coil now like most of us normally would, so just keep that in mind if you have metal parts in your body. Yeah, the stupid rubber door for the headphones sucks and comes open easily if you rub on it, but thankfully, Steve showed us how we can “fix” that easy and cheap. The last con is one that I cannot really put experience on because I never had a GPX previously, but it lacks the Iron Discriminate that all the old GPX, GP and SD machines had. Talking with Gerry I can see how this would come in handy as just another tool in the box. I am crossing my fingers that it could be added as a software/firmware upgrade. I mean they are already halfway there with the Double D coil and it sure would make the coil more “useable” at least for a couple of my situations. Well there it is for me. I am completely at peace dropping the Zed for the 6k. Keep in mind though, as we always talk about, this is for my conditions, my soil and my type of gold detecting. Everyone has their own conditions, ground and style and needs to make their own decisions and be comfortable with them. Seek advice, ask questions, do your own research, come to your own conclusions. Most importantly get out there and enjoy metal detecting and finding gold. The 6k taken that for me to the next level.
    25 points
  12. Just helping out a partner 🙂 More photos on Gus's site. https://www.naturalgoldtrader.com/222-p-98-Gram-Humboldt-County-Nevada-Big-Gold-Nugget.html
    24 points
  13. A couple years ago a friend of mine (who already had gotten me 5 permissions) asked her sister if I could come detect her 18th Century homestead in NW Massachusetts. I had hoped to go in 2019 but time got away from me, and you all know what happened in 2020. Finally we agreed upon a time window and I made it out there in the past couple weeks. Basically, after the Revolutionary War, soldiers were rewarded with property in unsettled parts of the previous Colonies and one of them started this homestead in 1785. The original cabin burned (remnants can still be seen but it was overgrown this trip) and was replaced by a larger house at the beginning of the 19th Century. The current owners have a lot of property but most is wooded and I had only three full days to detect so I decided to confine my searching to the 2-3 acres of cleared ground surrounding the house. Except for recently constructed garage (which replaced a barn burned down by an arson), there are no other current buildings, but with the help of a 1911 survey which they showed me we were able to figure out the location (and find the foundations) of a couple other long ago razed outbuildings. My goal this trip was twofold -- survey as much of this cleared area as possible and try to hone in on the best spots to cherry pick, meaning specifically undisturbed ground. As is typical, improvements to property occur over time, covering up some of the history. I wanted to avoid those areas during this short trip. I began in the front yard close to the house and not surprisingly got some nail hits, although trash wasn't thick. After digging 3 or 4 good sounding targets that turned out to be nails, I moved closer to the road, below a bulkhead wall. BTW, I was using the Minelab Equinox 800 in Field 1, 2 tones, wide open (i.e. no notching), recovery speed=5, iron bias F2=0, gain = 22. About 45 minutes into the first day's hunt I got a good, strong high tone and the dTID showed low 30's (silver quarter/half region). (I tend not to spend a lot of time requiring perfect, consistent dTID's since I've found so many good targets which don't give them. But I do listen for iron hints although even those don't necessarily turn me away, especially from weak signals.) The ground was suprisingly soft and sandy, unlike the stickly clay I deal with at home. Also, they'd been having quite a bit of rain (the mosquitoes were evidence of that!) so digging conditions were near perfect. At about 6 inches I pulled out a metal disc the size of a USA Large Cent (size no coincidence because that's what it was)! First target and I dig a coin I've never found before. I wasn't sure -- could have been a slug -- and took it inside to rinse it off and carefully blot dry (even that seemingly benign action might have been a mistake) and still couldn't see detail but showed it to one of the owners and she, with better eyes than I, said in the center it said 'One Cent'. Bingo! Already I knew it was my oldest coin ever since the last year of minting large cents was 1857 and my oldest previous coin was an 1864 2-Cent piece. I returned outside to that spot (coins congretate in patches, too ) and a few meters away got a nice high 20's hit, but rather weak. Eight inches down was a Barber dime. What a start! Unfortunately the only old coins I found the remainder of the trip were a few Wheat pennies. I did get a lot of relics, not surprisingly. Here's a picture of all but the obvious nails and modern metal trash: Lower right group are what I consider the best finds and I'll show a closeup of those shortly. I'm pretty sure everything around and directly below the horseshoe are related to horses ('tack') including the two obscure pieces inside the horseshoe which are similar, one a piece of leather with two large copper rivets and the other just a bare rivet. Interestingly I found almost identical pieces in June when ghost-towning in NE Nevada. I guess leather survives in wet climates as well as in dry ones. Some of the buckles are chrome plated which I assume (but don't really know) means they are fairly recent, meaning 20th Century. (I apologize for not taking better pictures. It was the last day and I was in a hurry to get on the road for a long drive to my next stop. I left all but the old coins with the property owners.) Here's a picture of what I consider the best finds: (Again, my photography leaves a lot to be desired....) I'll show the old coins (upper left) in a better photo. Lower left are modern coins (clad and Memorial pennies). Lower right are ladies' items -- stocking clip, powder compact, and lipstick tube cover. (The woman of the property owners really liked the compact and cleaned it up with some metal cleaner. It really looked sharp after she did that; too bad it was bent.) Upper right are four buttons, two of which were flat buttons. The large one had no identifying marks. It was made of a copper alloy (brass?). If anyone can shed light on its possible age I and the owners would really appreciate it. One of the several mystery pieces I found is the dark looking floral(?) shaped item above with compact. It had 8 holes arranged symmetrically (two of them don't show up) and was attracted to a magnet). It was quite thin and reminded me of jewelry. Above it is a copper broach or pin, possibly previously silver or gold plated. Now for the old coins: Four Wheaties (one from each of the 20's, 30's, 40's, and 50's) plus a 1954-D Jeffie (ok, not very old...) with the two best coin finds. And those two best: The 1941-S Merc came from a different site which I'll discuss in a separate post ('Part 2'). The 1911 plain (Philadelphia minted) Barber dime is in nice condition although not a scarce issue. But I'm still happy to get it. Unfortuantely you can't see detail on the Large Cent in these photos, but I can with a magnifying glass (still no date discerned 😞), and here's what I've found out so far: On the obverse ('heads' side) the lady is facing right. That's very important because only USA Large Cents minted between 1793 and 1807 faced right. So that alone tells me that I didn't find a coin which might be as late as 1857 but rather my 'new' oldest coin find ever is now at least 50 years older than that! I can see some clothing at the bottom of the bust making it a 'Draped Bust' type. That narrows its birthdate down to 1796-1807. There are still a lot of varieties in those 12 years and after trying to figure things out on the PCGS site I broke down and ordered the definitive work on these coins. It won't arrive until Thursday so you will have to wait along with me to see if I can narrow down further info. Meanwhile, can you help me identify this unknown find? It appears to be brass, but is hollow. The lower left of the picture shows damage, but it's breakage, not corrosive loss. You can see the seam to the left of the head where it joins the conical part. It reminds me of a calibrated weight for a scale but the only ones of those I've seen are solid, not hollow. Anyone?? To summarize the first part of this trip, in 10 1/2 hours of detecting (oh, I didn't mention that most of two of the three days was interferred with by Hurricane Henri!) I found some very promising post Colonial artifacts while just scratching the surface of a small part of this property. The (very generous, hospitable) owners were sufficiently pleased with what I found that I've been invited back, but I doubt I'll be able to make my return this year. I'll probably bring a weed eater next time and detect around that original cabin foundation. I can't wait....
    24 points
  14. Yesterday My buddy and I got up early to beat the heat (76@6:00am). We decided to hit the other side of the swim club that was fenced off a week ago, but now the fence was removed and open to the public. I was running the new silver umax and my buddy the 800. The first hour for me was a bust, just a bunch of pennys. My buddy was a 100 yards away and found 2 mercs and a bunch of wheaties. A little hot and frustrated, I walked another 100 yards to an odd looking small tree. This spot most people would have walked by. I'm thinking kids were climbing up and coins were falling out of their pockets. Maybe two swings and I hit a rosie. I stood up checked the hole and about a foot away I got a strong hit, Out comes a 1941 walker 1/2 dollar. At that point my buddy joined in on the fun. Two more hours of hunting in the now 100 plus degrees Yielded a total of 11 silvers, 39 wheaties, lots of pennies, kennedy 1/2 dollar. Oh and your good old trash. Not to shabby for 4 hours of sweat. I was liking the old tesoro's even more (would I have found them with the 800 Yup) but what fun would that be. TOTALS 5 Roosevelt dimes, 4 Merc's , 1 Washington, 1 walker 1/2, 39 wheaties
    24 points
  15. Grab a bag of popcorn and a beer, this is gonna be a long read. (Skip to the third paragraph if you are only interesting in my review of the GPX 6000) Before getting into why I decided to purchase a GPX 6000, I would like to give some background into what got me to the point of making that purchase. My friend "Brian" (Yes the one from Gerry's visit to SD) had been nagging on me that detecting is WAAAY better than sluicing or highbanking for gold. Me being stubborn, I would not listen to him as I was told by many of old prospectors "Theres no nuggets here". Were they hiding something or just oblivious to the truth, I do not know. After a year of recirculated highbanking on my dry claim and "Brian" detecting, it became clear to me that there is some truth to the message he had been preaching to me. That fall I purchased a Gold Bug 2. I loved that it is all analog inputs that require you to actually understand what the different knobs do. It allowed me to gain a better understanding of what the detector was doing. Not just letting the computer on it think for me. That fall gained me no nuggets as I was learning not only the detector but how to be successful at detecting. Many frustration finally led to my first small nugget that next summer. I was getting pretty good I thought as I would come home with a pocket full of tiny lead beebees and if I was lucky, a small nugget. I felt comfortable with the GB2, until I noticed that even though I felt I was doing well with the GB2, "Brian" was doing even better with his SDC2300 and GPZ7000. He would go back over areas I had just detected and pick up what I left behind. It was a perfect game for him as i would clear the garbage and shallow smaller nuggets and he would get the deeper larger ones. 😤 😄 I would even come back over to where he would have a target and check it with my GB2. It became obvious to me that ML technology had a clear advantage over my GB2. About the time I decided to go all in on purchasing a GPX 6000, I joined the detector prospector forum. I did more research into my GB2 and read Steve Herschbach write up on the GB2. Running the settings "hot" still didnt match the performance of the Minelabs detectors. After talking it over with the wife, I gave a call to Gerry at Gerrys Detectors, and after a pleasant 20min call with him I was sold. I gave him my deposit and waited patiently for my GPX to show up at my doorstep. Gerry, being the outstanding man he is, hand delivered it to me as soon as it had shown up at his store. (perfect timing pays off 🙂 ) Our first day out was a total success. I bagged the largest nugget of the day weighing in just under 2g, my largest at the time. Gerry and "Brian" also did well, both scoring more nuggets and pickers than me. This was also my first gold from this patch. The ground at this patch was very mineralized and had many hot rocks. Listening to my GB2 was a nightmare and I had not been successful at getting any gold from there until this day. There is probably more I can learn on the GB2 but I feared with the larger nuggets being around 10" deep my only chance was to run hot. The GPX ran like a dream comparatively. I was not used to the wobbling threshold that this detector has and it took me some getting used to. We were also less than 500' from a larger powerline and I was still able to get two nuggets that day.(and yes we were just running the 11" Mono) I was able to learn from Gerry while he was there on his trip, but he made the comment to me that I was already doing very well. Everything I learned up this point was from "Brian" who took Gerry's class from one of his past purchases. Gerry and his team must do extraordinary training as I only have had second hand training thru "Brian". I hope to make one of Gerry's training trips to get a chance to do some more detecting with him and his team! On to the GPX6000. This detector has been a dream!! And I really mean that! Ergonomics are very important and ML has indeed hit this one out of the park. I never ran a 4500 or 5000 so I cannot compare to them, but "Brian" has let me run his GPZ, and I was tired after an hour with that detector. Even though the GPX is slightly heavier than a GB2, I do not notice the weight. I can go for 8 hours and not be completely dead, unless of course I am digging a lot of targets! 😄 The controls are very straight forward. One thing I always liked about the GB2 is it is quite literally turn it on and go. With at least the SDC and GPZ (as these are my only other references) there seamed to be a long start up. Not with the GPX, turn it on and in 10 seconds you can be swinging. The onboard speaker is decent. I think I would have preferred it to be by the display as the sound is coming from behind you instead of in front of you. Its not a huge deal, I can still hear it fine, I just find that when your coil is making noise going over grass and banging on rocks, I find it harder to concentrate on the threshold. With that being said, I do prefer to run with the headphones as this allows me to concentrate better on what I am listening to. I know there have been alot of complaints about EMI. I would say that the first 15min seem to be extra chatty but after that it seems to settle into it. Maybe it is just my mind canceling it out, but I do not find much issues with EMI. I even leave my IPhone on in my backpack which is usually anywhere from 20'-100' away from me. When I do notice more EMI, I just click the noise cancel and in roughly 12 seconds I am going again. The one thing I noticed is there is about a 5 second delay after running the noise cancel(7 seconds) before it is running properly. (probably has something to do with an averaging function that it is running) The threshold is a bit different to listen to for me at least. Its more of a wobbly hum. Once you get in tune with it you just listen thru it and the targets are obvious. Even when you think you've heard a target, just a simple swing back over the same spot and you will have your answer. The collapsible shaft is spot on. It packs down small so it does not take up much space. Its also nice for getting thru thick areas in the woods. I do not like to overtighten the nuts as this then allows me to twist the coil about the shaft instead of twisting my wrist or arm to keep the coil parallel with the surface. It is also more comfortable for me to not hold the display straight up but more turned in towards me. I do not like to run on the automatic sensitivity settings as I do not like the idea of the computer making changes that I am no controlling. (even though I know it is doing some automatic changes with ground tracking) I have been mostly running on 8-10 for sensitivity and normal soil. The spots I have mostly been to are fairly mild soils. When I get a target, I will give it a little scrap and check again in difficult. If the target is still there then I go after it. I have found that the normal soil setting can give you maybe an inch or so of extra depth. If there is a target there, It will go off on both after scraping a little off the surface. I have noticed that the difficult ground settings will give a better response to small nuggets. On to the gold! When I say that this has blown me away, I mean it! I know I am not very versed with other detectors, so for some of you this may not be as impressive as it has been for me. My first trip out after Gerrys visit, I go to a patch we call the E patch. We have worked this patch on and off for several years now and had felt fairly certain we were done here. There is a lot of garbage here, and I mean A LOT of garbage and most of it is tiny shrapnel and the thinnest pieces of wire I have ever seen. My first day here with the GPX banked me 42 pieces of trash and 5 nice nuggets with the two larger ones weighing in both just over 1g. As you can see, that pinpointer is about 10" long and there is another 2" of soil above that. This piece was right at 1g. This was my gold from that day. The top left is the one shown in the hole above. Needless to say, I was a happy camper that day. My next day out with the detector would net me 10 more little nuggets. I have to say, it is a blast when you are getting that many pieces no matter how big they are! It is hard to read, but that total was 1.14g. The smallest of these was 0.03g and this was about 2" deep. In fact this scale would not register it. I had to use a more precise scale to get a measurement. The last day I was out once again surprised me. Both the detector and this location! In about 2 hours I was able to pull out another 10 pieces! this time though the weight would be 8.25g of gold! With the largest piece coming in at 4.25g! My largest pieces yet! This also puts me in the lead for largest nugget of the year in one of my running bets with "Brian". These bets are for a beer for each bet 😉 The depth of the largest nugget was about 14". The image is deceiving. I dug a narrow hole but if i put my hand straight across from the scoop, there was at least another 2" of soil above my hand and the scoop is roughly 12" long. The depth of this piece was about 8". Again this image is deceiving as the hole was fairly wide at the top so the scoop is laying down more. This piece weighed in at 0.35g To sum things up, YES I am well pleased with this detector. It has delivered me gold that I missed with my GB2. It has given me the confidence right from the get go. I know that if there is gold under my coil, this is giving me the best chance of seeing it. I no longer have to wonder if I am missing targets that other detectors would see. Overall I find this detector fairly easy to use and the light weight makes it easy to use all day. Will I ever pay this detector off, that depends on what you mean. It has already paid for itself in fun! It may very well pay for itself financially someday, but I will rely on my full time job to feed me. 😆 I can not wait for further usage of this detector and will always remember the awesome time I had detecting with the legendary Gerry McMullen! Like I said above, the GPX6000 is not just a detector... It is a thrill ride!
    22 points
  16. Hey Guys, Been getting a lot of questions on this method of digging, raking and metal detecting. Some have asked if you can do it anywhere and the answer would be Yes, but you might not find anything. I normally only use this method when we have found some nuggets concentrated in a small area, normally in a dry wash bottom. We have dug out nugget patches on the sides of the hills and benches also, but normally when mother nature does the work for you in the washes, you could have better luck in the right spots. We normally use two metal detectors, one for depth due to pockets and deeper crevices and a very sensitive detector like a VLF or now the GPX 6000. In our case we normally use the following tools - Minelab GPZ 7000 with the Nugget Finder Z Search coil 12" Minelab GPX 6000 Metal Detector with the 11" Mono coil Garrett AT Pinpointer (find this one to be the most sensitive to small gold) A couple of good digging picks, we use Apex and Doc's pick with super magnets Large metal rake with metal handle, any other rake is junk and will break quickly Plastic Scoops for recovery Small crevices tools like screwdrivers Plastic straw or narrow hose to blow out cracks/crevices Battery Powered Hammer Drill with Chisel Bit Also, whatever PPE, but we recommend eye glasses, good gloves and even hearing protection if you are using the hammer drill a bunch Hope you all enjoy. Keep in mind, this method has been using since the beginning of placer mining. It's not something we came up with, we just customized it with more modern day tools and technology to make it profitable in some areas to recover more gold. You can also add a good Drywasher and Vac-Pac to the mix if you want to work the gravels for smaller gold. In some areas you might be tossing out ounces of small gold you can't even see.
    22 points
  17. This was a hunt prior to finding the silver thimble in my previous topic. I have been detecting this house site on and off for a few years now and it still offers some excellent finds if you are patient & persistent. Most finds have been made with the Deus and HF coil using the Hot program, with only minor adjustments made with the reactivity and disc if the iron is unbearable. The property was occupied from the 1850's through to the mid 1900's sometime, and has thrown up plenty of Victorian era coins, relics and jewellery in the past. Probably my favourite find on this trip was the large Ironmonger's token with a beautiful patina, I really don't find many of these in my part of the world - moreso on the Victorian goldfields. Anyway, hope you enjoy the pics.
    20 points
  18. Today was a day that I've been waiting for for two weeks. A great forum member GB amateur contacted me to see if I would be interested in getting together to hunt on his way back from another trip on the east coast. Without reserve I said yes. With all the details worked out we got together today to hunt an old swim club established in the 20's. It was hot hot and more hot today and I was hoping we would have a good time before we both died of heat stroke. GB was running the 800 and I was too for about 15 minutes, When I decided to change over to the Compadre. I have found a few silvers there and had some problems with iron so what the hell. We both were finding some clad and wheaties. After an hour or so GB raised his hand with the first silver of the day a merc dime. Shortly after I pulled a 62 rosie. More clad and wheaties I decided to move to a spot I hunted a fair amount with the 800, But not with a Tesoro. Within a few minutes I pulled out a 44 merc. Two minutes more and out comes a 9k wedding band. The Compadre never ceases to amaze me. After a little while longer we decided to call it quit's and get some lunch and BS some more. Getting a chance to hunt with GB today was as fun as it gets and to have a good time with someone who you respect makes it all the better.
    20 points
  19. Last saturday the weather was fine and the grain was harvested. So I decided a little detecting will be nice. Grabbed the VX3 with the 7" Ultimate DD and headed to one of my favorite fields. Those field is loaded with iron and shrapnel, but a fixed ground balance helps a lot to get the detector stable and do some cherry picking. Two foil bits, a stone like basalt (came in as foil), a mini ball, a button (think prussian ~1900), 1Pfennig 1933, 1Pfennig 1942. Have to come back to this as there seems to be some more...
    20 points
  20. Thanks for the intro, GB_A. I'm a little late to this thread, so all I can do is add my voice to the already resounding chorus of “NO!” I found out long ago that detecting for gold is feast or famine...not a consistent income...which makes it incompatible with consistently recurring bills. So, as has already been noted, if you live in a tent or vehicle in the goldfields, are alone and without any bills to pay, and are a very proficient and experienced detector prospector, then you could eke out a living, but not consistently. I've done it, but it is only temporary; sooner or later the gold simply runs out. Add to that the fact that having to find gold to make a living really takes the fun out of detecting and turns it into just another job, and you can see why it's better to do it as a hobby for the sheer enjoyment of detecting gold nuggets.
    20 points
  21. I've wanted the 24k since Whites released it, it was all too hard to get with Whites and their very limited worldwide distribution, Garrett is making that easier and has a much larger distribution network around the world so the 24k is becoming more accessible now than it was. I had this one sent from the USA to get it quickly as the New Zealand dealer isn't likely to have any until next year, although I think that'll change when they start getting people asking for them 🙂 I was pleased to see it came with rechargeable batteries to get me up and running fast, a good brand too being Duracell AA NiMH. So a few photos.... starting with the box. Whites fans will be pleased to see all the references to Whites on the box. That looks like Steve's scoop to me 🙂 And the box contents The charger and car adapter, lighter socket to USB adapter and also a power socket with various countries that is like a phone charger really, it just converts the AC to DC 5v 2.1 amp USB power, so you can use any USB charging adapter that can output the 2 amp's to charge your batteries. The charger will also charge on a common 1 amp USB port, it's just going to be slower. Very handy as I can charge the batteries in my Caravan or anywhere really with USB charging. The charger can also charge AAA batteries as well as the AA's required for the 24k, quite handy. The 12v alligator clips charger to lighter socket is very good quality too, nice thick cables and inline fuse. Even the little lighter socket to USB is a good quality product, came in a little package showing it's got a 2 year warranty. It's made by Aukey and has 2 x 2.4amp USB ports on it for fast charging. The charger has Micro USB and USB-C support, so you can use your phone charging cable if you've got one of the many Android phones using Micro USB and forget to bring your Garrett supplied cable. This is the batteries inside the mounting box that slides up into the back of the 24k. They're easy enough to put in there. The battery box has a nice Whites logo on it. You'll see I've already used the little plug they supply to cover over the headphone socket, Good to keep the dust and weather out and I'll likely leave it in there forever. The speaker on the 24k is excellent, nice loud volume so I see little need for headphones unless I'm next to a loud river or something detecting. The screen's nice and big, easy on the eye, every icon and bit of writing is oversized, quite good for people that need glasses I would guess. The buttons are nice and easy to use and you'll note they left the Whites logo on there. The coil's nice, I haven't weighed it yet but it feels light as a feather, and the detector is very well balanced with the batteries under the arm cuff, I've never used one of the Whites detectors with the box under the arm cuff, but I'm seeing how nice the balance is with this style detector. Garrett also supplied little feet to stick onto the bottom of the box so you're not resting the plastic box directly onto the ground, quite a good idea as I generally hunt in very rocky areas. One thing I noticed almost straight away as you don't have to put effort in when you put it down to prevent it from falling over, it naturally wants to sit upright. 🙂 And the back of the control pod, again another Whites logo I think they've done a good job paying homage to Whites, while also putting their own touches on it, a very impressive detector. Now for the meat and potatoes, I took it down behind my house to the river and fired it up, I had no idea what I was doing as I'd only used it for a few minutes but I took a couple of videos comparing how it was operating compared to my Equinox with the Coiltek 10x5" Nox Coil. Take these videos with a grain of salt, I've spent 5 minutes using the Garrett 24k but I found it very easy to use and understand, it can just be a turn on and go detector by the look of it. It handled the ground well, and I was very happy with the sensitivity of it, I absolutely can not wait to get the smaller coils for it, especially the concentric coil. I had put the Coiltek 5x10" Nox coil on the Equinox so it was more like comparing apples with apples and tested both detectors on a small #9 lead pellet. The 24k certainly had the edge on air test depth. The ground performance seems excellent too, I love how quiet it runs, the threshold is very smooth, it's also interesting you can run it right next to the Nox with no interference for either detector, both run fine right next to each other. The build quality of the Garrett seems excellent, the shaft nice and solid and nothing feels flimsy. In this video I take both for a little walk around showing how they handle this difficult ground that's covered in hot rocks. The 24k was completely free of knock sensitivity, something I'm going to find very beneficial with the areas I hunt being rocky. Both detectors have their settings maxed out, the Equinox is on 25 gain. Now I've got to get the batteries charged up so I can use it properly, at least they had enough charge in them from the factory for me to take it for a test run. We are in a 2 week Covid lockdown at the moment, we are expected to come out of the worst of it on Wednesday so hopefully I can go find some nuggets with the 24k soon, judging by my first impressions of it I am sure I will be able to achieve that quite quickly.
    19 points
  22. Upon departing the Colonial Site in NW Massachusetts I made my way towards Eastern Pennsylvania to meet up with member here dogodog and spend half a day detecting one of his sites. I was fortunate that he had previously mentioned he'd like to get together for a hunt and since I was on his side of the world this seemed like a good time to take him up on his offer. The hunt was only part of the enjoyment as we spent some time (while driving and also over lunch, which he generously bought) to discuss detecting. The site, which is one he's hunted previously but continues to hunt and make good finds -- see his recent posts -- was previously a private swim and sports club recently acquired by the local government. I don't think I'm going out a limb to say that except for DoD and his friends he's brought there, it had never been previously detected. This is like stepping on a time machine back to the 1970's but with a 2020 metal detector! We began searching an open area which may have been a sports field or maybe just a play area for kids (of all ages) but it was in the open sun and it was becoming what dog said was the hottest day of the year so after about 15-20 minutes we headed to the backside of the property where we could detect in the shade of some large trees. I was using the Minelab Equinox 800 and 11" coil with my standard park and school settings: Park 1, 5 custom tones, no notching, Recovery Speed = 4, Iron Bias F2 = 0. He told me he was finding silver coins at shallow depths so I turned down the gain to 22 from my 24, but even that was overkill although the EMI was easily eliminated with noise cancel. I actually never did a ground balance since pumping the coil showed the current setting at turn-on was quiet as a mouse. The early 15-20 minutes in the open produced some clad and copper Memorials. The back (shaded) part proved more promising. I got the first trophy (and as it turned out, my best find of the day) -- a 1941-S Merc in excellent condition other than the dark toning which was surely caused by some chemical in the ground. After showing DoD, it wasn't more than 10 minutes when he called me over to show me his first silver -- a Roosie. Then he shifted into high gear and found a 9 kt gold mens wedding band followed by his own Merc. I found quite a few pennies (see photo below) and a few (not old) nickels the remainder of the total 3 1/2 hours of detecting but only about half the number of coins (old and new) that dog did. Hey, I didn't want to show him up on his own turf! Here's a pic of my total recoveries: Oh, that's not a pulltab from a dinosaur's drink can but rather a thoughtful gift from DoD -- a detecting towel. I still haven't figured out why he put a pulltab image on it.... At least it wasn't a Stinkin' Zincoln. Speaking of which, there wasn't a huge amount of trash, and particularly not that many beavertails which often fool me as being nickels. I got more aluminum bottle caps (three, one of which isn't shown) than classic pulltabs and not a single modern tab although I was doing some mental discrimination. Three tacks (which DoD warned me about) sure sounded sweet, as usual. Here's a closeup of my coin haul: As usual my photography leaves something to be desired, but you're not missing much detail. From right to left: clad quarter (2001 North Carolina state quarter -- most recent date of all my recovered coins), four clad dimes, three Jeffies (oldest is the top one, a rather crusty and corroded 1941-D). Next are three rows of copper Memorials sorted by decade: one from 1980-82, nine from the 70's and four from the 60's. On the left are three heavily green scaled Wheaties and my best find, the Merc. I did find 3 Zincolns (shown in the previous photo) but in my book those are trash, not coins. Here are closeups of the 1941-S Merc (also shown are my two best finds from earlier in the trip which are highlighted in another post): Except for the dark toning (which isn't all that bad), the condition of the Merc is quite nice. I note that the ground in this part of the country, and that include NW Massachusetts where the large cent was found, seems to be even more unfriendly to copper and copper alloy coins (including USA 25% nickel composition coins) than my soils at home. I know others have found similar deterioration of coin in other part of the Eastern USA. I don't think it's due to the trees since we pretty much share the same species, so it must be some inorganic chemical(s) in the soil. Better than the detect was meeting dogodog and discussing several topics including soil effects, depth of finds, and coil options -- particularly DD vs. concentric. To put an exclamation point on this last topic, he showed me how well his Tesoro Compadre (w/fixed 8" concentric) performs, which he switched to after a short time detecting with his Eqx800. I've returned home with a new found respect for Tesoro analog circuitry and am planning on learning my Vaquero. (kac, don't say "I told you so" even though... you told me so, as have Monte, Rick N, and others here.)
    19 points
  23. I haven't done a story on a gold find for a while, partly because once you find a patch with a bunch of nuggets everything else seems pretty insignificant, a couple of months ago I did just that, it's only my second patch but had quite a number of nuggets, I'd guess at least 40 (Correction: at least 80 nuggets) and over 30 grams in total. I lost count of both the nuggets and the grams we got out of it in the end. I did take a couple of videos on the first and second day of it, after that I stopped filming and just worried about detecting as filming videos is very time consuming and wastes valuable detecting time 🙂 That patch has been the highlight of my detecting time and hopefully I can find another in the future, I'll put links to the videos for anyone that wants to watch them and hasn't seen them already. https://youtu.be/qs-e8HO7xdU https://youtu.be/tppU5XZe77o Now to the more recent adventure, one of the most common gold spots I've been to is being developed, very soon it will no longer exist, already a large area of it has disappeared over the past few months with more to go yet, seeing it's probably the closest gold spot to home and one I've found a reasonable amount of gold before so it will be missed greatly. It's obviously getting extremely hard to find gold there as it's not a huge area really and it's been done a lot over the years by a number of people being an obvious spot to look. My focus on this day was to take advantage of how well the GPZ and Concentric coil handles EMI to hunt almost exclusive in and around the power lines where people including myself with previous setups were unable to really detect very well, especially with my GPX 4500, it was terrible near the power lines, and what inspired me to try out a QED which ended up working quite well under the power lines but just didn't have the power of the GPZ. I didn't take all that many photos as my aim was to get some video, I always struggle to get gold finds on video as I just use my phone to film and I have to put it down to do the recovery 🙂 I have a GoPro but just haven't bothered to use it yet. I went to some bedrock and worked my way up digging every signal and recording and deleting all the recordings as they were turning out to be shotgun pellets, this is entirely normal in this area as it has a big rabbit plague and shooters love spreading their pellets around all over the place for me to dig back up again. Here is a video of the first gold find, a .109 of a gram nugget, I was pretty happy with that to start the day as often at this location I go home empty handed. I didn't get the entire thing on video and I had my detector in difficult from when I was messing around the other day doing some testing and didn't check my settings, I'd never normally use difficult in my soil as Normal works just fine. Fortunately it didn't prevent me finding the gold, or the numerous pellets before it Once I'd finished that bedrock area I walked up under the power lines to detect hoping I'd find something others couldn't get, I took a little video there of how the detector was working under the lines, I really love how well the GPZ handles power lines seeing they're in many of my gold areas. You'll also notice at the end of the video the millions of bits of rabbit poo on the ground, this is the reason for the shotgun pellets everywhere. You'll notice in the video I discover I'm in difficult and seem a bit surprised, this is when I worked out I may have wasted the past hour detecting in difficult and it went through my head now I'll have to go check that bedrock again 😛 I was quite happy at that point I took the video or I may not have noticed for the rest of the day. I started detecting along under the power lines and ended up in a little area I don't think I've been into before, I'm terrible with directions and locations so it's quite possible I have been there before and don't remember it but it didn't look familiar, I was still recording every target dig to try get a gold find on video and managed to do it, I think this might be my first time ever getting one from start to finish on video, quite happy with that. And a couple of photos of it. And my lucky last nugget of the day if you could call it that was a 0.038 of a gram nugget, very shallow on some bedrock, it took me about 20 minutes to recover this one, but I only got a portion of it on video, I kept moving it around but couldn't pick it up, I had no idea where it was in the cleared area, I was wishing I had a VLF with me with tiny coil to narrow it down. I'd imagine there are quite a lot of these little guys around it's just the amount of pellets you'd have to dig to find them would be crazy. I do it more for the challenge but the novelty wears off after digging a massive amount of pellets and not finding any nuggets and if you ignore the pellets you'll miss these little bits of gold. So here are the 3 little bits for the day and the weights All a bit of good fun, I really enjoy chasing these little bits especially after the first one pops up to get you into gear looking for more. I can't compete with the photos lately out of Alaska for gold though, I'm just glad I can do the hobby near home and find a few bits to keep me happy. Here is a little tour video of where I was detecting. Keep in mind to run these coils you need to have an adapter and that involves cutting the end off your existing GPZ coil and making an adapter out of it, it should only ever be taken on by someone very skilled at electronics or really the best thing to do is get a professional to make the adapter for you to avoid any problems.
    19 points
  24. At long last after many years of crushed and bent copper thimbles, I managed to dig up my first ever silver thimble. It was quite a deep and scratchy target with rhe Deus running the round HF coil, and being packed with soil thankfully it managed to retain its original shape. I been fortunate with many good finds over the last few months around the old house site, will post up some silver coins and relics later on.
    18 points
  25. White’s went out of business because their models were old school big box designs, and even though old timers are fans of the big metal boxes, the younger generation looks at them like they are old rotary phones. There is little reason to produce detectors that were already failing on the market. Garrett has to make new machines that are forward looking, that can compete with Minelab. That’s reality. I also recognize fondness for brand names, but the last thing we need is another First Texas selling detectors under multiple brand names. Garrett got the White’s IP, plus kept the name out of Chinese hands, in effect shutting off a potential competitor before it even got started. Was every White’s customer going to become a Garrett customer just because Garrett bought the name? I guess there are people who will buy things just because of a brand name, but the reality again is White’s was bleeding customers right and left to companies building detectors that people want. Look at White’s old models, look at the Deus and Equinox, and you see night and day. You can be a critic of these new generation machines all you want, but all you have to do is look around to see that these types of machines are what the vast majority of people are buying and using. My last couple trips to the U.K. I can’t recall seeing a single White’s detector. It was pretty much all Deus and Equinox, with only rare exceptions. In PI Minelab rules. That is what Garrett needs to address going forward. I for one am looking forward to what Garrett does in the future by way of genuinely new machines. Apex is a peek at the future, a toe in the water. Old White’s machines, and even the AT series, that’s the past, and in the rear view mirror now, like it or not. I personally have a very good feeling about where Garrett is heading. In my opinion Garrett is now the U.S. manufacturer best positioned to succeed going forward. But it’s up to them to prove that to the rest of you. Let’s all check back in a year and revisit the question.
    18 points
  26. Final Modified Version of my Excalibur. Was able to silence the machine in rough waters by removing all of the knobs except one which ..and it is sealed from the saltwater by a o-ring and custom easy, fine tune knob. Stability is very good close to shore where water is smacking the control pod and the coil wire... I do need to get a shorter Allen set screw for the sealed on/off threshold knob I made...but for now the allen is coated with aquaseal and the internal shaft on the pot has a plastic cover to break contact with the SS knob shaft. Not real happy about the toggle on the handle which is used to go between PP and disc. But I had a bad batch of the IP68 yellow momentary push buttons ..... had two fail on me.... I was right in the middle of a good hunt and had one go out on me..so I pulled it out and chopped it off to finish the hunt., got home and made more changes to the excal. Hopefully in the future they can get better quality switches. And special Thanks to Steve detector rods for rushing a few of the cam locks for the lower shaft..., so much easier adjusting the coil for the hunt, which is a very important part of coil control and Pin pointing the target..... Picture of the hunt I was in the middle of and the yellow IP68 button went on me.. I can not stand to hunt in disc, which was the mod it was stuck in..chop-chop and all was good..
    18 points
  27. Wow that is some serious black sand!!😳 I presume you guys have goldfields areas that are similar? I remember some gullies in Arizona having huge amounts of it in the bottoms of the creeks and behind obstacles!! Getting back to the Salt and Cancel modes I’ve not done a lot of work using Normal timings so my observations were mainly in variable hot ground that required the use of Difficult. In the case of the 17” I’ve found the biggest disadvantage is in the increase in salt or conductive signals due to the bigger size, there were some places where I could use the GPX11 with a bit of movement signal but when I tried the GPX17 it was virtually unusable. The next issue of course will be the obvious one which will be more EMI , for us this will start to appear next month as our weather starts to change. Mineralisation with the 17 seemed if anything slightly less from a variability from surface concentrations POV but there was some deeper sounding hot areas that sounded better with the bigger coil as expected. The true eye opener is the outright sensitivity for such a large coil, there is not much of a drop off on tiny target sensitivity when you go to the larger coil except for the usual bigger coil into tighter spaces loss as is to be expected. This point really makes the GPX17 a game changer as you can cover vast tracts of country very quickly and snag the tiniest of pieces that could point you to a potential patch of missed gold. 😎 JP Recent starter nugget in virgin ground that lead to well over an ounce in a few days. A few nice chunkster payday nuggets came out when working the area First days haul Gold I found working the patch over a number of days, all thanks to that first tiny piece I found wandering around with the GPX17 😊
    18 points
  28. Short run at one my usual stomping grounds. This time I hit the lower section near the power lines to see how the Apex handles emi. My buddies Nox 800 and my Kruzer aren't fond of that area as it gets noisy. Not bad enough to quit but enough to be annoying. The Apex handled it well and separation is great amongst the trash. 2nd hit of the day was the 14k ring with yellow stone, not sure what the stone is. The other good hit was the 1871 Canadian 10c. When I first dug it I thought it was a barber not sure and just tossed it in my pouch. Got too hot to keep going so called it day shortly after.
    17 points
  29. I saw this video posted by Chicago Ron about his visit this summer to the AKAU operation in Nome. From YouTube: “1 week trip to Nome Alaska with 7 other hunters. We tried everything they had. 2 days working the slick plate, groups of 2 for half a day. High banking and panning, and lots of detecting tailing piles that had been pushed with a dozer. Mike got the find of the trip with a 7.93 ounce specimen worth well over 20K. I had the most nuggets with 7 and we all got gold and had a blast! Already planning the return trip End of July 2022” Nome Alaska Gold Hunt August 2021 Warning Adult Language!
    17 points
  30. It should be getting obvious the GPX 6000 is a great nugget detector. I think it also has great possibilities for beach detecting for jewelry. If somebody was to ask me about relic detecting, I’d tell them the same thing I say about the GPZ 7000 - way too sensitive to tiny ferrous. There is such a thing as too sensitive, and the fact that the GPX 5000 can be set up to miss the tiniest ferrous is actually an advantage. The 6000 will bang hard on the tiniest slivers of ferrous stuff, like almost invisible bits of hair thin wire. However, it might be something those who already have the machine might want to play with, and I have already been learning a few discrimination tricks while beach detecting. Anyone familiar with the Minelab PI detectors knows you get two main tone responses, either a high tone, or a low tone. The simple way to think of what these tones mean is high tone = small or weaker / low conductive targets, and low tone = large or stronger / high conductive targets. The dividing line between the two is not fixed, but varies with the ground balance setting. This means people in lower mineral ground will not get the same results as those in high mineral ground. It’s a complex subject, one I go into great detail at here. The GPX 6000 has one bit of magic for this task. The Normal/Difficult ground setting button. It allows a change in the tone response by simply pressing a button. I do not know the details of Normal vs Difficult, but it changes the timings enough to flip the tone response on many targets. I found I could use it to get four different target classes. Hi tone normal, high tone difficult = Aluminum foil, misc aluminum, wire, most bottle caps, misc small ferrous - low VDI targets. Small gold. Hi tone normal, low tone difficult = Nickel range targets, larger aluminum. Larger gold. Low tone normal, low tone difficult = Zinc penny range targets. Even larger gold. Low tone normal, high tone difficult = Quarters, dimes, copper penny, high VDI targets, nails (larger ferrous). Silver rings. The results closely mimic my coin detecting results with other ground balancing PI detectors, but with a big difference. With all the other machines I had two classes of targets. High tone small stuff, low conductors, and low tone large stuff, high conductors. This new method delivers four target classes, potentially a big step up in discrimination capability with a PI. Ferrous can show up in any of the ranges, just depends on size and type. By digging the fourth category, it’s basically just high conductive coins, and nails. No zinc pennies or aluminum screw caps. Not good if you have lots of nails, but I will be doing this in a park soon, as many parks are not loaded with nails. Others might be, so it’s site specific. The other big caveat I already mentioned. This assumes bad ground, with a ground balance setting to match. The GPX 6000 is automatic and sets its own ground balance. You have no way to set and lock it, unlike a TDI. So I have no idea where the tone shifts will occur in other ground. The good news is that you really don’t need a PI as much in low mineral ground. This might allow people to get more depth on silver coins in really bad ground. The DD coil also skews results, depending on which mode it is in, salt or cancel. In other words folks, I’m looking for people who are willing to experiment, and document. I will be doing more of this and adding new information here as I go. Any adventurous souls, please do the same. There is a definite crude discrimination system included with the GPX 6000, by way of an easy button push. Let’s figure it out, and it may open up some new detecting possibilities. I blew it on my first go at this, as I dropped finds into different pockets of my pouch, to separate them by category for a photo, along with the trash. Then I got home and by habit just dumped it all in my sieve to sort the sand and trash out - oops. So will do better at that next time. Bottom line is I got real good at calling out the coins before digging. There are some real possibilities here for the adventurous types - PI naysayers need not apply!
    17 points
  31. Here is Codans FY21 shareholder report. https://codan.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/Presentation_CDA_FY21-full-year-investor-presentation_19.08.2021.pdf A few interesting notes, highest full year sales in the companies history, pretty impressive during a pandemic. Metal Detecting sales growth of 38%, however interestingly the recreational detector growth was 42% which I can guess is attributed to the Vanquish and Equinox. Gold Mining detectors up 37%. Also an increased distribution into big box retailers which seems to be a pattern I'm even seeing here in NZ with hunting and fishing and outdoors stores starting to hold product. A good thing about Minelab pointed out in that report is 30% of employees are engineers and they have 700+ employees so that's a decent amount of engineers. a good sign for the future of their detectors, although there are no indications in the report of any new detectors coming out in the next financial year like there were in the previous report with the GPX 6000 and MF5. Some key images. And now the FY20 Global footprint, you'll see the excellent growth. Although it may not look it overall, the growth in Asia and South America is massive but by far the biggest market is Africa, and we saw the focus there with the 6000 release. You can't blame them. They should have at least put a dollar figure for NZ on the map, my purchases alone should at least deserve a figure there. Come on now! And another key image from the report for us detectorists 🙂 Go the mighty Vanquish, exceeding expectations, with it's performance for the price I'm not surprised. I wonder how long they can hold the position of the Gold Monster being the entry level gold detector of choice, someone is coming biting at their heels for that title soon. So nothing new in the next year likely from Minelab.... It'll be a while yet until we see an Equinox 1000.
    17 points
  32. got out for a 2 hour hunt this evening .. the lakes and rivers around are flooded .. so I hit a clad field, but they were all set up for soccer so I just did the edges .. 1st hunt ever with the vanquish 340 and it gets a solid 6 .. 4 inches down .. 14k white gold .. size 8 .. 1 amethyst .. 4 diamonds .. $3+ in clad .. 1 butterfly pendant .. kind of wish that this would have been #100 .. but it's #101 .. the start of my next 100 .. pretty sure the 1st hunt with the 340 would have paid for the machine with 1 find .. but my wife likes this one so it goes to the jewelers and gets fixed and cleaned .. nickels were ringing up at 13 .. so would you have dug a 6 in a park?
    17 points
  33. Hi Vic, myself and two other customers set up that test bed initially to test a range of coils. It was just supposed to be for a quick comparison, so we did some crude measurements and target size estimations, most of which have since been forgotten. But the targets have surprisingly remained buried for many years, and I have used the test bed so many times now that I know how different machines respond, so I have avoided the temptation to dig them up and record the weights and depths accurately. I still may do that some day. There is a hackly bit of lead, about 2.5g that is also buried quite deep, and this is a great "challenge" to newbies with any machine, as coil control and positioning is critical. From the best of my memory the largest target is a 7g lump of lead, and depth was initially at about 45 cm. The ground to the side of the hole is quite mineralised clay, so mono coils in Normal timings often perform poorly. The best combos I've found on this target are: Any GP series machine with Detech 15" DD coil GPZ7000 in General/Difficult GPX4500 in Enhance with 12" Evo GPX5000 with 17x13" Evo (Enhance or Fine Gold). The Commander 15x12" also responds well The 15" Evo & Detech 15" super deep also gets it easily, but the signal response is broader, not as crisp as the 17x13". The 6000 with 11" mono really struggles. The 14" DD in Normal and Salt is the best combo. Ground moisture and EMI levels vary the results slightly, which can be quite interesting.
    17 points
  34. Last year was my best ever for the amount of nice jewelry I recovered but this year was shaping up to be one of my worst. Granted, I wasn't detecting as aggressively due to other commitments and conditions didn't seem to be as good as last year but I went from 60 to 0 just like that! However, a couple of summer finds lifted my spirits and filled me with optimism for the fall and winter seasons. The gold chain and cross was a shocking find in more than one way. It was found in the darkness of night and my hopes were dashed when I turned on my headlamp because in the artificial light it had a cheap stainless steel look to it. I drove home thinking that the hunt was a bust until I emptied my finds pouch and was stunned by the radiance of big gold amongst the rusted iron and corroded zinc pennies. This hobby never ceases to surprise me. GL&HH!
    16 points
  35. Since Ida came through the weather has been great. Three days of 70s and today in the low 80s with a strong wind. Got two new permissions, a field with construction materials and a lot of old trailers and equipment in it, and a fairly new house. I first went to the farmhouse and hunted around a bit. Got the bracelet, two dimes and a nickel, all modern. Went across the street to the field and dug the quarter and 3 pennies. Again all post 1982. There isn't much here, but I did dig the WW1 service button. Sadly the shield fell out, but I have it. this is the field, but I really want to get permission to the house next door, I am working on it: Finished up the field with some (5) of the next picture, 32 coins in one day. Felt like being at one of my campgrounds. The oldest coin is a 1944 wheat, I got 4 quarters, one dime, 4 wheats, 17 memorials pre-1982, and 6 Zincolns. Sadly the '44 isn't steel, and the 1968 quarter is clad. 😀 This is the house. It is pretty new, but the coins say it is much older than it looks. It's been quite a weekend.
    16 points
  36. Lightweight 17 elliptical coil, you`ve got to love Mono coils for their lightweight but in saying that for me I`ll run using a Hip Stick wheras I found I don`t need to do so with the 11inch coil. It is a very stable coil even when swung amongst grass, but very sensitive, it gets the gold no doubt. As per my "first impression of the 6000" thread the shaft locks do not hold sufficiently and this problem is exaggerated by the larger 17 coil. In regards to EMF, I have found this is no problem, a simple press of the ground cancel button and in no time your ready to continue, tis just part and parcel of using such a sensitive detector. Like all elliptical coils this is tops for "linear detecting" ie. pushing ahead through grass and not swinging, this may sound an unlikely detecting method but be assured it has found me many virgin patches over the years, mainly following Brumby (wild horses) worn tracks, of course once found such a patches location is saved to GPS and returned to when the grass has dried off and lays down later in year. My initial comparison test patch for the 17 was the Placebo Patch found by the GPX6000 amongst high grass with the 11inch coil, I found the 17 could not find further gold on the bony/shallow parts of patch but higher up and lower down the slope where the soil was deeper(and grass bigger) the 17 showed its depth advantage over the 11. The 17 will probably be my go to coil for patch hunting, I still have not returned to using the GPZ7000 but can see once I`m fairly confident I`ve done these deeper soil areas with the 6K/17 combo will be time to run the Z/XCC 17 combo.
    16 points
  37. Got a message rather late Saturday from Chase, he had threatened to come down here and made good on it. 😀 Went to the old farmhouse and the newer house to see what we could find, I was glad to have someone more experienced to check with me. If you've been following I've found 75 coins at this house now, and no silver. I am starting to think those that said it was cherry picked could be right. 😵 First we hacked around the farmhouse and I was glad we did. I challenged Chase to look where I had been, I will let him tell ya what he dug but it was pretty darn good. He showed me some techniques he uses, and ran both an Equinox and a Deus at the newer house. I took mine over a fresh spot, found 2 memorials, and then went back to the front yard and dug 4 more, all masked by other stuff. Pretty much everything we dug was secondary to what we went after! All I got was a new quarter, mangled on the surface of the driveway, and 6 memorials, ranging from a 1959 D to a 1974. Dug the address tag, and then some kid toys not shown. Still no silver found at the newer house but... 😉 At least it was a good day for Chase. Made it worth the trip. At one point we discussed the Equinox issue with coins on edge. I'm thinking of dusting off the "old" Garrett Ace 400 and trying it here. 😀 Had a blast! It's always good to put fresh eyes and more experience on one of my permissions. Nothing wrong with humility now and again 😳
    15 points
  38. Recently got a replacment coil on my Apex, stock one had become knock sensitive and was going crazy with emi. Garrett did a quick job keeping me up and running. Descided to take it to the local park for a couple hours, used MF for the most part and my custom mode was simply same notches as jewelry mode with the addition of the first iron block on. Lets me nose off some the flat iron like bottle caps and get a grunt so I dont dig them. ID's where fantastic, machine ran like a champ. Included my trash, not sure what the big chunk is, not iron and it is pretty hard. Little over $3 in clad, battery has 1.4 volts still and the 14k ring is 5g.
    15 points
  39. Climate change and gold prospecting… Welcome to the Bonanza! Although many people worry about climate change, it is nothing but great news for gold prospectors.. Climate change will not just open new areas or expose more gold, it will also make prospectors wealthy beyond their wildest dreams.. Those who might doubt my wise words should consider the following facts before shaking their heads.. Fact 1: Climate change will bring more bush fires! We’ve all been secretly pleased when our favourite patch burns to the ground, no more trees or ground cover makes it far easier to swing our coils.. Climate change will up the ante even more, huge areas previously covered by 'green things that get in the way' will now be accessible.. Fact 2: Climate change will bring more droughts! For many gold bearing areas this is great news because it will see a mass-exodus of people who hate prospectors.. No more asking for permission from cranky landowners or government authorities, just vast uninhabited prairies, savanna and pastures waiting to be dug up.. Fact 3: Climate change means it’ll get hotter! Whilst some people bemoan this fact, they forget that night temperatures will get hotter too.. No more cold desert nights! Those places too hot to prospect during the day will see the ever resourceful prospector venture out during balmy nights.. This is no great hardship as hot days will be spent in the air conditioned comfort of your Winnebago, drinking cold beers whilst browsing DetectorProspector.. Fact 4: Climate change will bring more storms and floods! This really is Geology at its best, all this non-stop erosion will make finding gold a breeze.. Areas previously covered by thick layers of rocks and soils will be washed away (like in a giant sluice) leaving behind nuggets the size of boulders.. No more waiting around for millions of years, now you’ll be able to find gold every time it rains! Fact 5: Climate change will raise sea-levels! Since there’s not much gold to be found on a beach, this only affects beach detectorists and is of no concern to prospectors..
    15 points
  40. Haven't done much digging at all, heat and humidity is brutal and I figured the finds can wait it out. Hit an old park near my house, took the Tejon out with the 10x12, not a whole lot of iron but a lot of aluminum surface trash so I was hunting for the tinier targets. Ground is really hard packed as they have car shows and gatherings so it was like digging cement, can't make bit holes there and forced to make little flaps and fishing the targets out and I ended up suffing the IH 1889. Ring seems very old, tested at 10k. I have a close up on the mark.
    15 points
  41. This morning I was surprised to find a gold medal along the beach at Alma Bay on Magnetic Island.. It's a gold medal for women's cricket (that's a weird batting sport here in Oz).. Whoever won it was the 'best on the ground'.. On the reverse is the name of a college in rural Victoria (on the other side of the country).. I suppose neither them or the island were under a Covid lockdown at the time she was here.. To be honest the gold medal is a bit of a consolation price.. I'm not supposed to be on the island but rather in the goldfields with my son.. as I mention in another post I was on my way up there when I broke down.. nursed the 4WD back to the island where I can work on it but will be out of action for a while.. I've contacted the college so I can return it to the rightful winner.. hope I get to meet her! I've never met a gold medal winner before..
    15 points
  42. So, I went to one of my favorite spots in Northern NV that I have pounded over and over again over the years with all the detectors I own. I went there not really expecting to get anything, but rather to test the 17 inch and the 14 DD in an area that is very familiar to me. The area is plagued by high salt content and yesterday there was also a strong howling wind that made it almost impossible to detect (not to speak of the dense smoke from the CA wildfires that was lingering in the air and that covered the sun at all times). I could only detect by walking in the direction of the wind, if I would walk sideways or against the wind I could not hear anything, even at full headset volume. I first tried the 17 which I managed to stabilize at 4 clicks/difficult. At times, I was even able to go to Auto/difficult or Auto/normal (always with threshold), but this was only possible in between wind gusts. Let me tell you, this coil is incredible sensitive to shallow targets despite it's large size, almost as sensitive as the 11 inch. I managed to pick up a small flake about 2 inch down that was almost as noticeable as with the 11 inch. Pinpointing is a bit tricky due to the coil size, but totally doable since it is a mono, it just takes a bit practice (highest sensitivity where the ring is). The large coil size may initially suggest that depth is intended, but my first impression is that it rather is an extension of the 11 inch capabilities, just covering a larger surface area. This is great because it allows to sweep open fields with a big coil and covering more ground without loosing sensitivity for shallow fast timing gold. I have only used it once and I don't know about it's capabilities for deeper targets, but I will update once I am more familiar with it. One thing I noticed is that it is is rather bump sensitive. You can use it without bungee for some time, but I opted to use my hipstick/guide arm pretty soon, also for better coil control. I have tried the 14DD only for an hour or so, but my very first impression is that it is an absolute game changer for high salty ground. I ran it in salt cancel mode/4 clicks/normal and probably had the most stable configuration I have ever had in that region. The sensitivity is still remarkably good, with pinpointing possible by using the left side of coil (left D) with good sensitivity around the entire D-edge. For neither coil of the 6000 I noticed a huge difference between normal and difficult timings, but as Steve mentioned this could have to do with the soil here. But for sure changing from normal to difficult is much more impactful when using the 7000. Overall, I continue to be super impressed with the 6000. All three coil options are extremely useful to have and compliment each other. The 6000 is an amazing machine that I recommend to everyone! As a faithful and loyal 7000 owner I carry my GPZ around wherever I go. But I can't help but notice that I haven't used it much lately....
    15 points
  43. Alma Bay continues to spit out lost property.. Although not as weird as a gold medal for women's cricket, this Iphone was lost on the same beach.. I found it this morning buried in the sand just above the high-tide mark.. It's already been claimed by a mighty happy chappy! At least he was very easy to find.. Always good to spread the joy!
    14 points
  44. Hello everybody!! I apologize for not checking in earlier but a lot is going on here at Nokta Makro as you can imagine. Now regarding the SMF, we decided to make some major changes to the device after the first prototypes were produced including some features that I had mentioned in my earlier videos/interviews. We believe that our valued customers will excuse us and understand that the changes are all for the good and that the delay is only due to our efforts for trying to make the device lighter and more user friendly for the customer. In addition, I have no idea where the name Lightning is coming from but the name of the product is not Lightning and the name will be revealed at launch. I will be doing a live video on our FB page soon to give an update to all customers around the world and answer some questions for those who will be watching.
    14 points
  45. Hmmm, yes, I did not activate any such thing, and don’t know why it started. Google going power mad no doubt. I’ll get on it and figure out how to deactivate it. I like the setup as it has been for years, and have no desire to change it. Google is always pushing for more, more, more, until sites end up being nothing but ads. I promise that won’t happen here!
    14 points
  46. It seems one of my recurring detecting New Year's Resolutions has been to find new hunting grounds and not get stuck in a rut trying to find the last crumbs I'm capable of tasting in the sites I've detected extensively. So far this year I've done well (at least one silver coin in each) at three 'new' sites (two parks and one school) and 3 weeks ago before heading out East I was able to get in a short 1 hour hunt at another park I've never previously visited. I vaguely knew about this spot previously but for various reasons I never tried it. My first 'requirement' is that a new (to me) site have a decent chance of hiding old coins. For the most part that means having had significant human activity prior to 1970 and preferably prior to 1960. This 4th 'new' (to me) site of 2021 didn't seem to meet that minimal requirement. In fact there is a prominent bronze plaque on site which states it didn't become a park until 1974 and previously was an industrial storage lot for several decades. However, Historic Aerials hinted at a more promising past. It seemed to show that some of the modern park's features were present at least back to 1965. I'll go deeper into that later in this post. That first 1 hour hunt produced three Wheat pennies along with four copper (alloy) Memorial Cents and a couple clad dimes. Three Wheaties in an hour on a site which supposedly wasn't frequented until 1974 was surprising but far from earth shaking. I filed it away until after getting home from my week+ in the East. After getting home I needed some time to decompress (i.e. take care of other things) and it was quite humid besides. Further, this summer has been wetter than normal and the grass grows back as fast as it gets cut. Finally this past Thursday (2 days ago as I write) I got in 3 hours on a freshly mown park. I concentrated on areas that the Historic Aerials indicated would be most promising but still did some fairly broad surveying. The results were a bit disappointing compared to the previous short run -- 1 Wheat cent vs. 4 copper Memorials along with a few modern 5, 10, 25 cent coins. Here's a photo of only the coin finds (oh, plus a Sterling ring my wife has already claimed): The next day I returned for another 3 hours, this time hunting exclusively on what I considered the most promising part of this site. Now the floodgates started to open: 10 Wheaties compared to 5 copper Memorials along with $1.85 in larger denomination modern coins: The dates on the 10 Wheaties are: 1909, 1918, 1920, 192x-D (haven't yet resolved that last digit), four from the 40's and two from the 50's. Non-cent finds don't seem to show any particular date pattern although only 2 or 3 are from the current millenium. Now for the non-coin finds from these last 2 days (total of 6 hours): Pretty much the typical park trash. There is one arcade token from 80's or later (right below five Stinkin' Zincolns). The ladies watch appears to be nothing special (no precious metal or stones). Possibly most interesting is above the drink can lid -- it's a copper piece that looks like it has a coin slot in it. The padlock is badly corroded and the shank has been cut with a hacksaw. It may be from this site's industrial days. Oh, one last interesting find. To the right of the Hot Wheels car is a wooden piece I recognize as being from a Lincoln Logs wooden playset (not metallic)! So what explains the plethora of Wheat Cents? Here are some hypotheses: 1) The bronze plaque is wrong and the property was turned into a park well before 1974. This seems a bit odd -- I mean the park department historian can't get a date right and spends hundred+ dollars on a sign with erroneous information? 2) The industrial site's employees spent some of their lunch-hours in the same shady(?) sloped spot, either accidentally dropping coins or even possibly playing some kind of penny-ante game tossing them and missing picking up some? 3) Nature's randomness is conspiring to try and trick me into thinking this site's Wheats/Memorials ratio is indicative of something other than just luck. The plausibility of this last hypothesis can be tested with statistics. I'll start with my on-going 5 year record of fraction of copper Lincolns that are Wheats. That's 338/1547 = 21.58%. Most of these have come from parks and schools, all of those sites having been established no earlier than 1974 while most of the remaining sites were private permission homesites that were established no later than 1960. Thus using this value as 'typical' for sites frequented for at least 47 years is a stricter requirement than necessary. Still, using 21.58% ratio of Wheats to total coppers, the chance that of the first 27 copper alloy Lincolns found, 14 or more would be Wheats is less than one in 7100. Of course Wheats tend to be an indicator that even better (yes, silver coins) treasures are hidden and awaiting a coil to be swung over them. Hopefully I can add some more evidence by digging one (or more) of those on my next trip to this spot.
    14 points
  47. Found this article from 2018, I missed it at the time so others may have too, pretty interesting, Looks an easy find for a metal detector but I'd imagine most would dismiss it as junk and move on without digging. Workers found large number of ancient coins at a construction site in Baishui county of Weinan, Northwest China's Shaanxi province, on Nov 9, and archaeologists said most coins belong to Song Dynasty (960-1279). Zhao Zhangfeng, director of Baishui cultural relics office, said that police received the report of the discovery around 11 am on Nov 9, and police soon arrived at the site and cordoned it off. Archaeologists later arrived at the site and collected about 100,000 coins, weighing 460 kilograms. A few coins date back to Tang Dynasty (618-907), and most are of Song Dynasty. Zhao said that few people could have so many coins at that time, and initial analysis showed that the coins belong to the old-style Chinese private bank that buried the coins during wars. Continue reading here: https://www.chinadaily.com.cn/a/201811/13/WS5bea3daca310eff30328853b_1.html
    14 points
  48. No new bits to show here but a couple have been soaking in AliBrite for a bit. The bigger piece from 3 or so weeks ago went from this… To this… Ended up at about 4.3 grams. And I think this is my total of GPX6 gold so far…except for 2 small bits in trash/scoop/pick carrier belt. And a bit that went via AirMail somewhere. Just shy of a hundred bits and apart from 2 trips to my home town I haven’t been more than 15 kms from my current home due to work, kids footy and COVID regs. Likely looking at another lockdown here by tomorrow night 😒 I was telling JP that Victoria seemed to be going OK and I might get to WA in a month. Can kiss that goodbye 🤪 Hope you all have a shiny yellow weekend!
    14 points
  49. Got creative today and decided to sew up a super light weight cover with a waterproof liner and the bottom padded for my GPX 6000. 3 ounces for weight.
    14 points
  50. There been a fair bit of talk about the sensitivity of the GPX6000 so I just want to show people a potential issue that might confuse things if your unaware and why I commented on another thread about my opinion on issues with inline coil connectors for dongles etc. Below is a pic of the way I set up my GPX17 coil, you will notice I pin my Velcro pretty high up the lower shaft to create a nice loop in the coil cable to allow for pivoting of the coil. This is specifically done to prevent the cable coming too close to the edge of the coil when I lay the detector down to dig a target. As you place the coil on the ground the pivot point folds till the shaft is almost flat against the coil, in the case of the GPX17 that is a fair way from the centre of the coil so there is the potential for a lot of the lead to come close to the coil when it’s laid flat potentially causing noise. To test this for yourself pin the lower lead at about the same distance as the edge of the coil (you can do this on the GPX11 too), then fold the coil flat and push the coil lead loop into the coil edge and listen. The 6000 is so sensitive it can easily see its own coil cable hence why I pin mine further up the shaft to avoid a loud signal as I lay the coil flat. Lastly the 2nd red circle is to show how I allow some looseness of the cable when I wind it up the shaft to the control box (I also pin the coil lead between the handle and the upper locking nut), this is specifically done to prevent stiction of the lead whilst swinging as the shaft flexes from side to side, if you have things too tight you will create noise from the lead being constantly twisted and flexed by the swing induced deviation/flex in the carbon fibre shafts. JP
    13 points
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