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  1. Hi Guys, Happy Australia Day!! Kind of cool to have another Aussie developed PI raising some eyebrows today. I should start by saying that unfortunately, FCC testing has not been done yet, so the product cannot be sold to the US at this point in time. But is available to NZ customers - so ignore my email Simon 😉 I have done a little testing on the E1500, and a few of my features/suggestions were added in, but the detector was already quite developed when I was approached for some feedback. There was a software update and then the user manual needed to be updated to include the changes. I've only had limited time on the latest version, but here's some info that will get you up to speed a little bit. 1. First of all, performance wise, this thing sits between a Gold Monster/Gold Kruzer and SDC2300. It is extremely sensitive to tiny targets, but depth won't match a 5000/6000 on large targets. I think the SDC2300 will remain superior in really bad soil conditions, but the E1500 is quite adjustable (broad sensitivity range), and obviously with different coil options, e.g. round/elliptical/semi-elliptical and flat wound/bundle wound, you can kind of dictate the performance a little bit. 2. It is for mono coils only, but works very well. Coil calibration feature is a nice touch, and optimises the electronics for any slight variations between coils. It will also tell you if you need to calibrate or not. 3. Current wise it draws about 700 ma on average, so a 10 AH power bank should run for about 13-14 hrs. Great for guys hiking into remote spots with no power. Just carry three power banks and you're good to go for days. 4. Tested on a 0.05g bit of gold and the E1500 was better than a 4500. With a Sadie coil it is super sensitive, and the tone modulation is very sharp. With an older Minelab 11" super gold search coil, depth is improved, but signal sharpness is not as good, but runs extremely stable. The 14x9" Evo seems to be a great coil for it. I think a Detech 8" mono, Minelab 8" Mono and NF 12x7" Advantage would be the pick of the coils for really hot ground, as they are bundle wound. Possibly add in the old Coiltek 11" round terracotta, and Minelab Commander and earlier Super Gold Search. But in average mineralised conditions, the Evo coils work great. 5. Hotrocks. A 6000 with 11" Mono is a little more immune to hotrocks than the E1500 with Sadie coil in Ultra Fine timing. With a slower timing, and larger coil, hot rocks are far less detectable as you'd expect. But, being a PI it is vastly superior to a VLF. 6. The shaft and hand grip feel great. 2 arm strap sizes is excellent and should cater for most people. 7. Buttons feel really nice. They have a very positive click about them. 8. The Auto ground balance works great, but is on the slower side. Slower than 4500. This is a ground balance reset only, i.e. after it has ground balanced, the ground balance is locked - just like a GP/GPX machine in Fixed. It is not continuously tracking like the SDC2300 or 6000. However, you can see when the ground balance is going out with the Ground Drift function - so it is sort of tracking in the background, but it's up to the user to reset it. 9. Interference with other detectors - I've only been out once with another prospector who was using a GPZ7000 with a 12" NF coil. We found that I needed to be about 10 metres away, that's with a Sadie on the E1500. Any closer and the GPZ would start to pick it up. 10. The Sensitivity range is great. I expect most people are going to run it in the low 20's, but in super quiet conditions, 26-30 are kind of like boost. I've got a lot more testing I'd like to do, and still playing around with headphone options, but having independent threshold and volume controls as well as adjustable tone, it should be able to adapt to pretty much any wired or wireless options. The target ID feature was demo'd to me, and appeared to be quite stable, but I haven't played around with it much at this point. So what is? It is a very well built PI machine, with a collapsible 3 pc shaft, has the benefit of being compatible with legacy 5-pin coils, a very well thought out user interface with a simple menu, and all the important functions you need. It is not waterproof, and doesn't have built in wireless, and comes as a bare bones kit, but all these things have allowed it to be offered at an attractive price point. It is not a deep machine. If you want depth on a budget, get a S/H 4500 or 5000 with a 20" mono or 25" DD. If you want to find small gold as well as specimens and reefy gold, then the AlgoForce E1500 is worth a look. Hope that gives you a bit of a better understanding of its capabilities. Yes, I plan on doing some videos so you can see how it behaves and what it sounds like.
    44 points
  2. ok one last comment before I let it go…… The thing is seven years ago I laid out a challenge for a decent built reasonably priced PI detector for people who frankly are not a lot of the forum members as far as I can tell. If buying a $900 multi or maybe at most a $1200 multi is a stretch for somebody, then these $4000 plus options are out of reach for these people. If I can buy a top notch VLF for $900 -$1200 then in my mind I should be able to get a top notch PI for no more than twice that or $1800 to $2400. I sold detectors and trust me, you talk to a guy with a $700 detector and tell him he needs this $8000 detector and he looks at you like you are insane. I have been and always will advocate for power at affordable prices, and the nature of technology means it is inevitable. I’m just trying to help it along. I emailed AlgoForce the day I saw this pop up and got a very nice personal response from Ruifeng Huang, or Alex as he asks to be called. I’m a fan for sure based on the way he thinks he needs to respond to us to give us what we want. Refreshing to say the least. I hope he won’t mind me sharing this tidbit…. ”Believe it or not, our E1500 was inspired by your “Under 4 Pound, Under $2000 Gbpi Challenge” about two and a half years ago.” That is gratifying because that thread was made knowing that it would be seen by every company out there. I’ve been around a long time pushing and shoving and holding my breath until I’m blue in the face to get what I want, and I have learned that consistently expressing my desires in a respectful and logical fashion for long enough does actually make a difference. I’m proud to have moved the needle in the right direction in many small ways, and this is the icing on the cake as far as I am concerned. So yeah, I’m a fan and I’d be crazy not to get an E1500 after asking for one for seven years and them finally delivering on what I was asking for. A decent performing ergonomic PI at a decent price. That’s not shooting for the moon, it’s just a reasonable request, and I never thought it would take seven years for it to happen. But it has, and I do think we finally have a winner! Now if it prompts other companies to respond with their own offerings, that also was the goal. I believe heart and soul in competition being the way forward and so I hope very much that Nokta, Garrett, Fisher, and yes, Minelab and others decide to play in this game also. Because whoever builds the next $2000 PI will have to build one at least as good or better than the E1500, or why bother? Fully waterproof? Why not? But the bar has been set and the future is bright for affordable PI now more than ever.
    40 points
  3. My Algoforce arrived a couple of hours ago, I had a quick refresher flick through the Quick start guide that came in the box and had a play around, to my surprise I could use it inside my house on default sensitivity and it was quite stable, I was able to test some coins on it for target ID and mess around learning the menu navigation. It's a puzzle at first as you need to remember the irons purposes, most icons are a giveaway as to what they do and the screen even tells you which ones to press on certain screens. So far first impressions on usability is for a detector with settings like this, it's very easy to use. I was able to configure my 10" X-coil on it in no time without the need for the instructions. It quickly calibrates to coils, a couple of seconds if that and you can store their size in there so you can easily go back to them, it comes pre-configured with a few common coils. It comes with this cool bag to lug it around in, I shouldn't say lug it around as it weighs nothing, it's super light and makes the 6000 feel heavy. The 6000 in the picture is shrunken down a bit for storage but was put there for a bit of a size reference. This is the contents of the package. All very professionally made, the look and feel is a long way different to the more homemade feel of the QED, a similar priced PI machine. And it all assembled with the 10" X-coil on it and configured. It's really easy to assemble, It takes a bit of getting used to the coil connector, it's different that's for sure, I'm sure if someone didn't like it they could put a GPX 5000 one into the shaft as I'm pretty sure you can buy the part but it worked fine and once, I knew what I was doing it did the trick, it doesn't use coil rubbers, a different design entirely but it does work and is probably perfectly fine, I'm just not used to it and with X-coils have very solid ears they don't flex out to fit it between them, at first I didn't think it fit the X-coils but I worked out if you slide them in from the back they fit, trying to get them in from the top of the ears is impossible. Maybe X-coils need to adjust their coils for an extra millimetre or two of width on the ears to make it an easier fit. I'll discuss this with them as they are resuming production of their GPX coils due to this detector hitting the market. Now, I filmed some video, it is very raw, my usual style of no editing and what you see is what you get, in the video you're seeing what I saw the first time doing it, I'd not even tested the nuggets I went over prior to filming. I'd just checked a couple to ensure it even worked 🙂 I'd used the detector for about 10 minutes at home in total before filming the video so be gentle, I'm just learning it. I will say for a fact it's more sensitive to small gold than the GPX 5000, some of these nuggets I used in the video the 5000 can't hit on at all. It's also more sensitive than the QED by a significant margin. I tested on a $1 coin, and had the target ID then I went into my yard where a couple of $1 coins are buried, and it was able to ID them very well, with a stable ID, I was quite surprised by this and I have to go back out with a VLF and double check it all and get some video. This is all very early days, but I'm certainly happy with it, it handles EMI so well for a PI , better than anything I've used before, and I think even for someone that just has a GPX 4500/5000 it would be a big compliment to it being more sensitive and picking up the gold the 5000 misses due to it being porous or just generally weak on, and for anyone not wanting to pay the crazy Minelab pricing for a 6000 or 7000 it's a bargain. On lead shotgun pellets it's similar to the 6000, neither will hit the #9 pellet but as the sizes increase both are the same with the pellets they will detect. I've not checked depths or anything yet just ability to hit them comes in at the same size pellet. I have so much to experiment on it yet, but happy with it for sure. The videos currently still processing by Youtube to HD but the SD version looks available now. I haven't even watched the video myself, this is raw as it gets.
    39 points
  4. Today I took the Algoforce for a gold hunt, it wasn't the location I was wanting to go to as the one I wanted to go to I had more confidence of finding something, its temperature was going to be too hot, then I saw a closer spot right near JW's house was cooler when I checked its forecast, I couldn't resist and decided to go, although I had little hope of finding anything, being so close to home for JW and his uncanny ability to find all available gold he doesn't leave much behind. The first thing I did seeing this area has powerlines right through it was to test the Algoforce under them, results can be seen here, I must say though, very impressed! I had a hunch it would be good, it's one of the few detectors and only PI that I have that I can use inside my house for testing. I next found a 22 shell, pretty typical here and generally screamer targets, sometimes I'm lazy and reject them, risky move but I can get lazy in the heat. Seeing I was digging it all, the general rule for a new detector I dug it up, pretty neat video, a 22 shell comes up with a Target ID of 22 😛 I later tested the same 22 shell on the Sadie, and was pleased to see it came up 22 on an entirely different coil, a 10" Spiral vs a 8x6" bundle wound. You've probably heard me whinge about the green hot rocks in the past, so I wanted to see how it goes on them, the 6000 can't balance them out in normal but does to a degree in difficult, not completely gone but better than normal, The Algoforce on the other hand, bang.... gone! bye bye Green hot rock! To top it off once balanced out I put a little shotgun pellet I'd found on top of it, a giant big green hot rock and it still was able to detect the pellet as if the rock didn't exist. I notified JW I was there seeing he lives very close nearby and he popped down for a detect and to catch up, he had his 6000 and 10x5" Coiltek with him, a good combination for the area. He was also kind enough to bring along an assortment of GPX coils that I don't have to try including the Sadie (mine still hasn't arrived from the NZ Dealer) and a 6" Coiltek round mono. Unfortunately, I didn't get a chance to test out the mono which I'll explain later but quickly swapped over from my 10" X-coil to the Sadie to try it out, seeing it was the manufacturer tested coil on the detector I wanted to see how it goes. The Sadie is very light, quite nice to swing such a little coil in the rougher areas, knowing it has hot edges is a nice attribute too. In my first video up the top with the 22 shell I explain about the coil cable and how the Algoforce detects it when you pick up and put down the detector with the 10" fitted, I even accidentally left pinpoint mode on when sitting it down and the detector screamed, it was sitting there pinpointing the coil cable and had an ID for it 🙂 Seeing the pinpoint mode doesn't need motion it just screamed on the cable. I later discovered when switching to the Sadie the coil cable doesn't get detected near as much, those with a Sadie probably will barely notice when lifting up and putting down their detector, whereas with the 10" spiral it screams. Pinpoint mode will obviously behave the same with the non-motion. The 10" spiral is much more sensitive than the Sadie, but I already knew this, if someone's after maximum sensitivity to small targets size doesn't matter as much as windings do, the Coiltek 9", 10" X-coil or 12x8" EVO will likely be the most sensitive, never used the 12x8" EVO only owning the 14x9" Evo but I'd likely give it the tiny target sensitivity over the Sadie too. That's not saying the Sadies a bad coil, its edge sensitivity will give it great benefit over the far less sensitive edges of the spiral coils so if golds up against rocks it will win, it's also good for poking and prodding with the sensitive edges and it may handle some bad ground better too. I found a little bit of gold under a rock not long after putting the Sadie on, It wasn't detected from above the rock, I was just lucky enough to flip a rock that had a little nugget (flake) under it. JW had also recovered a little nugget, one he had detected some time ago in the schist bedrock with the GPZ and I think it was the 15" CC, he ended up not being able to find it, thought it was lost and moved on, the coil was probably just too big and awkward for his little dug hole in the bedrock or something to get close enough to it, but it was gone, today he managed to get it with the 10x5" Coiltek on the 6000 smashing out more rock. It was smaller than the one I'd just found, quite a bit smaller. Time went by and nothing for either of us, so I explored further and climbed down a bit of a ledge and found a target, I was trying to get it out and it sank down into a hole in the rock of the ledge to the next layer below, I was trying to get it out learning right over hoping I don't fall into the prickly briar rose bushes below, I'd be in big trouble then, and I kept poking the Sadie in under the layer and it kept sounding off so I thought I was hitting the target, so I'd slowly slide out some soil and it would keep sounding off the same, it turned out it wasn't sounding off on the nugget, it was sounding off as the coil cable was getting crushed down and touching the coil. It is vital with the Algoforce to have a nice secure coil cable that can't go near the coil, it just shows how sensitive it is, the GPZ with small coils like the 8" and 10" is the same especially lifting up and putting down the detector so I'm a bit used to it. I gave up that method and risked climbing down to the bottom of the little ditch in among the prickles, sadly 3 of them stabbed into my hand, I plucked them out one by one but by the 3rd one I had a problem, it had stuck straight into a vein, when I pulled out the rose thorn a big squirt of blood shot out like a jet, then it swelled up rapidly like a balloon under the skin, it got quite big, about half a golf ball, then in a seconds the swelling went down a fair bit to a blackish lump, and its stayed that way. I felt quite sick at this point, really dizzy, so I just used the Sadie from down there where I could get into the gap between the rocks better, retrieved the target and climbed back up the ledge leaving my detector and pick on the ledge to collect from half way down from the top, I climbed up with my scoop in hand with the target in it. Once at the top I was so dizzy I just sat down for about 10 minutes with the scoop sitting next to me hoping it wasn't some junk. Once I recovered enough, I climbed down and retrieved my detector and pick and climbed back up to recover the target from the scoop. I was so pleased it was a piece of gold after all of that. Here is the video of it all, I quite big bit for what's left in this area, that's for sure. I felt really weird sort of dizzy sort of drunk but it could be a combination of heat exhaustion along with the weird injury so I walked back to JW and told him what happened and showed my nugget, he suggested I had a sit down which I had planned to do, I sat another 20 or so minutes and just felt worse so I call over to him that I'm going to head home cutting my day short, I stopped for a snack on some wild black berries on my walk to my car as I hadn't yet had lunch. I felt horrible the entire drive home, almost vomited half way home going around the lake which is a very bendy road for about 30 minutes along the side of the lake. I'm coming right now, no longer dizzy that I've cooled down and had a long cold shower and plenty to drink, I had run out of drink very early in the day too so perhaps I was dehydrated. Next time more drink bottles coming than just the one little one. So here is my hand now A bit black and swollen still. I really like the Algoforce, it's an incredible detector for the price, a real game changer for people that don't need the absolute best of the best yet still want a very high-performance PI machine with cool features and at a very cheap price. The more I use it the more I like it. I really hope I'm the first paying customer that's found gold with the detector, that'd be pretty cool.
    36 points
  5. I went for a little weekend trip back to the Mojave desert, and spend this afternoon at one of my favorite places. The landscape is just breath taking, and makes me forget the busy life that I am usually having. Prospecting to me is much more than just finding gold (or not...). It is like being in a meditative retreat, where I can just enjoy the beauty of nature and disconnect from the day to day routine. I went back to one of my favorite places, and after several lead pieces and bird shots I heard an extremely faint warbly signal which caught my interest. The signal could have easily been overheard had I not swung really slow. My settings were treshold on, manual max, difficult (in the video I say 13 but I think max is more like 10 clicks). I started to dig and to my surprise the target turned out to be rather deep, next to a buried hot rock. It was a small flat 0.15 grammer at about 13 inch depth. I was stunned to find such a small piece at this depth, and with a rather small coil. This once more shows the excellent performance of the 6000 for small gold, even at depth.
    33 points
  6. So, we've had a lot of positives so far, and well deserved too however, now's the time to point out some other things that need to be known. As I've talked about in previous posts with it being such a sensitive PI machine it picks up the coil cable, especially with smaller spiral coils, not so much the bundle wound coils like the Sadie. Generally, this isn't too much of a problem and you only notice it putting down or picking up the detector when it sounds off on the cord moving, however if in bushy or rocky areas that coil cable can get moved around a bit causing false signals. The supplied Velcro straps will hold the cable in place however not in position, if you want it in a certain spot so it doesn't move plastic clips are a far better option. I've managed to find my plastic clips, and fitted one, now my cable is in a much better position than with a strap that allowed it to slip around the shaft, this will help a lot with the coil cable being detected. I don't know much about the clips, they maybe something designed for another purpose and someone discovered them and packaged them up as a detecting product and sells them off for a good markup, either way this place is where I got mine. They fit the Algoforce shaft perfectly and come in a pack of 8 clips. Next, the USB power bank shape can be beneficial too. The design is quite well thought out with 2 straps that hold it in place, and a rail sliding bar with a hump at the end to hold it there, along with rubber pads on the rail to give some grip. You can adjust the length of the rail by loosening a couple of thumb screws with your fingers, expanding it out to fit your battery and locking it in place again, then the little lump at the end helps the battery hold in place. This lump could probably do with being a little bit bigger, but it can't be too big as the USB ports on the battery bank and right there too so if it were bigger, it may cause some problems with some battery banks. I found with mine the lump is too small as I've purchased a Belkin 20000 mAH which seems an awesome product, I've always liked Belkin gear, they've been around for decades but its a very rounded battery bank so the lump doesn't do the job as well as it could and my battery bank does tend to move a bit, I'll sort out a solution here, perhaps some sticky Velcro on one of the rubber pads, and on the battery bank to line up and give that little bit more stick, it really wouldn't take much to lock it in tight. This is the Belkin, if only it had square edges 🙂 I have another battery bank laying around which appears a much better design for a detector. The one below is another one with more Sqaure edges that holds in a lot easier, with minimal effort. Solar panel on top. On the bottom a torch and a little clip, it has very square edges so mounts into the Algoforce more solidly, that clip could potentially be used to lock it in even better, I've not looked into that yet although I doubt it would be needed. This one also has a rubber housing giving even more grip. Really with one like this there is absolutely no problem, so something to keep in mind when buying a power bank. Next up, wireless audio, I've got an MPow atpX LL transmitter, it fits perfectly onto the back of the control pod with some adhesive Velcro on the transmitter and on the detector, I had no problems with this, even in my wild bushy hilly terrain, it held on no problems at all. The thing I am going to change is the audio cable, I'll get one with right angle connectors on it, that way they don't stick out and I'll be able to use a Velcro strap to hold the cord in place nicely, if I can't find one the right length, I'll just make one, the right angle 3.5mm plugs can be bought at Jaycar and I'd imagine any good electronics parts retailer, or online of course. I noticed no extra EMI induced by having the transmitter on the control pod, it appeared to cause no issues at all. You'll note it has a little rubber cover to put into the socket if you're not using headphones, a great thing to have and can be removed and stored away if you're having headphones or a transmitter in there permanently. Next up, the battery holder straps. Positioning of these is vital to ensuring a good tight fit of your battery, having them tight means the little rail and rubber lump are not near as necessary, and to tighten them I've found this is the best positioning as then the clip is out of the way, if it's in the wrong position it will prevent a tight fit. Now, the cable from the power bank to the detector itself, it goes up into the handle up plugs into the detector inside the handle using a USB C connector, wise as this is now the standard and remaining that way. The other end of the supplied cable is USB A, I'd imagine they've done this for compatibility as older power banks won't have USB C but on mine at least it means the cable is offset on the side of the battery bank, making it more exposed to being hit by branches or rocks. By using the centre USB C port on my power bank I'll be able to route the cable up onto the shaft to keep it out of the way. This is the USB A plug end on the supplied cable for those unsure what USB A is. Now, even better there are USB C to USB C cables with a right angle at one end, you only want it at one end as inside the detector pod you need a straight plug, but on the power bank if you plug in a right angle one to the centre USB C port such as on my power bank the cable can be secured so it's well hidden from obstacles hitting it, the right angle cables come in various lengths, I'll work out the exactly length I need and order it today, 25cm should be the right size I think. Last but not least, the exposed USB ports on the power bank are going to get dirty, dusty and all sorts of things stuck in them, potentially damaging them or the battery bank, even water from sitting the detector down on wet grass seeing they're right near ground level. An easy solution to this is little silicone USB port covers you can buy. I've bought ones for USB A as I'm not going to use those ports and be USB C to USB C. Amazingly this Belkin battery is going to give me over 20 hours detecting on a charge, probably a few more hours than that. Makes some other detectors battery sources seem a bit problematic running out so quickly. On another note, my Sadie just arrived. These are a few little niggly annoyances or just things it is wise to know about the Algoforce so if you're buying one you can be better prepared. They're not necessarily faults with the detector but more advice on suitable products to improve it even further.
    30 points
  7. Today I took the Algoforce to a gold area, the first thing I did was put it under some powerlines in the gold area and see how well it would do, the 6000 is very ratty under and even some distance from these lines, the 7000's also a little unstable but more usable at higher sensitivity than the 6000, the reason this is important to me is I've found good gold around these exact lines, biggest bit was .7 of a gram only a few meters from where this video was filmed with the GPZ and 8" X-coil. So being able to run nicely around these lines is a big plus. So, rather than my word, here is a video This was my first target under the lines, unfortunately just a little bit of wire, but a demonstration of how it works under them with a target. I will do a post about the rest of the day also; this was just my first target as I entered the area I was going to be detecting and like every new coil or detector I wanted to test it under these power lines as these ones run straight through a gold area. I'm sure if you went back through some previous posts, you'll see the 6000 here, and the 7000. Again, I haven't watched these videos back yet I only just got home, I have no idea if its windy, or if there are any other disturbances, I like to do raw video, not editing out bits and pieces. I like people to see exactly what I see. By the way I found gold, so hopefully I'm the first E1500 paying customer to find gold with it!! that'd be cool.
    29 points
  8. Ok guys, I've gone through all my testing notes and did some fresh air testing as well - I know, not really a test of the machine, but does give some insight into how the different timings and coils may perform in the field. The Sadie is the best on EMI. For some reason the 12x8" Evo is a little chattier. 14x9" Evo is a bit quieter than the 12x8" - can't work that one out? I don't have a 14x9" Evo here at the moment to test. Also, haven't compared a Detech 8" yet. Here are some coil/timing comparisons. All carried out using Sens 23. Using the Sadie, comparing Fine and Ultra Fine, there is only about 5mm difference either way, and the crossover point where Fine starts to do a little better is about 0.3g. Anything smaller and Ultra Fine was the same or better. But it depends on target texture. I tested a 0.72g bit with ironstone, and Ultra Fine was still seeing this one a little deeper. On an Aussie 5c coin (our smallest, lowest conductor) depth was identical. Sadie vs 12x8" Evo, both in Fine, the Evo was consistently better across a range of targets. On a 0.33g rough bit of gold I was getting 3cm better with the Evo. 4cm better on the 5c coin. On a prickly 0.26g bit, the Evo was only 5mm deeper. I suspect on much smaller gold, they will be about the same and would come down to the settings you can run. I compared a Coiltek 11" Elite and 12" round Evo, and the Evo was 5-10mm better across the board. On the 5c coin, the Evo was seeing it 15mm better. I also tried an old 12x7" Advantage Mono (I've asked Rohan to bring this back into production!) and depth was consistent with the Sadie. Across the range of gold tested, the 12x7" was the same to 5mm better. But, the 12x7" started to pull away on anything bigger than a gram. On the 0.26g prickly piece, the Sadie in Ultra Fine was 15mm better than the 12x7" in Fine. I didn't test the 12x7" in Ultra Fine. Overall, here's who won the showdown on specific targets. I wouldn't take this too seriously as performance in the field with optimised settings will obviously change the results. But assuming everything was equal, and all coils were happy to run on Sens 23, this would be somewhat accurate. Aussie 5c - 16" NF Superlight Mono beat the 12" Evo by 2cm (20mm). Gold plated pendant - 16" Advantage Mono beat the 12" Evo by 3cm. 0.26g prickly - SDC2300 was better than E1500 12x8" in Fine by 5mm. (haha yes thought I'd throw that in there) 0.32g flat/worn - 12" Evo in Fine beat the Sadie & 12x8 Evo, both 10mm behind. 0.72g gold w/ironstone - the 12" Evo in Fine beat the 11" Elite and 12x8" Evo by 10mm The 14x9" Evo I used briefly in the field and tested on a few targets, and it seemed a very nice compromise between the 12" round and 12x8" Evos. Obviously stuff around 0.1g and smaller will see the small coils and Ultra Fine start to pull away.
    29 points
  9. QED was the right idea but poorly executed so it missed the bus and comparing the AlgoForce to the QED does it a disservice I think. And "tiny gold only" is nonsense. Of course it will detect larger gold. What is the GPX 6000 but an overpriced "tiny gold detector" and I'll point out the popular SDC 2300 as another "tiny gold detector." Yet the SDC has surprising punch on larger gold. AlgoForce is simply being smart in emphasizing what the vast majority of people are really going to be detecting these days - smaller nuggets, not one ounce plus gold. I think it might be some of you who are surprised. It may not be what people who only care about cutting edge performance want, granted. But the Fisher Gold Bug Pro sold in huge volumes due to the simplicity of its ground grab system and the Monster also proves that regular folks want ease of operation. If this proves to be the Gold Bug Pro of the PI world they will sell piles of them. Most users here have little understanding of the wider retail world and the market that exists for a machine that has the right balance of features at a price normal people can afford. The pricing of machines like the 6000 and 7000 is completely absurd and impossible for far more people than the well to do members of this forum appreciate. Yeah, I can pop for a GPZ 7000 at the drop of a hat, but trust me, a minority of people are in that boat. The market for a detector like this is huge and has been waiting for the right company to open it up. I expected it to be Nokta but AlgoForce may have beaten them to the punch. Or not. We will see, but it will be a very interesting year or two ahead of us no matter what.
    29 points
  10. Last winter was a bust...I was going to take winter off, to work on my own house, and detect...then we got huge storm after huge storm, that plan went out the window...spent all my time, trying to fix everyones roofs. This year, doing better. Been out a few times, exploring, running across numerous cabin sites, and gold rush workings( Bought a 900 last year, after I lost the remote to my Deus1. Finally starting to feel compfortable with it. Got my coil across a few good targets recently. The Cohen center disc, and quarter, where found by my son, rest is mine.
    28 points
  11. Man I haven't posted a hunt in a long time...been doing lots of projects and just haven't been going out at all. I was able to secure a M8 coil the other day and that amped me up to go out and see how it performed. This morning I hunted two different basket ball courts in two different parks. It was raining and hardly anyone was out... I got wet and muddy but I had a good hunt and I'm happy about the M8 coil it performs really well. The gold ring is 10k and rang up a solid 31 which is where some pull tabs tid...so dig those tabs! I was hunting in all terrain general sensitivity below 20 most of the time , all tones 5 bin. with disk on most of the time...nice easy digging and back home by 11AM strick
    27 points
  12. This one will put a smile on ya dial....biggest piece Lee has ever found Savage Prospecting Click to 7.30 to get the best bit 😉
    27 points
  13. Well looks like Simon beat me by a day, but I've got a video up showing the user interface in detail and cover most of the settings. AlgoForce E1500 Specifications & Settings
    26 points
  14. Cold and cloudy day today, but I wanted to continue looking around where I was last post. Today I brought both my Deus 2's with me, one with the 13x11" and one with the 9" coil. I was using a slightly modified Relic program on both. In one spot I used the 9" for a while, I've been over it with the 13" but it's very trashy, I wanted to see if I could find anything else with the smaller coil. I managed to get a small button and a piece of decorative horse tack amongst the iron, very impressive. I got the 13" rig and walked other places with less trash for a while, and headed over to a spot I've been over before. It had lots of iron as well, so I retrieved the 9" again. While I was searching this spot I noticed a lot of oyster shells, and when I dug more came up. Seems to me there was a lot of activity here many years ago. Oyster shells are a really good indicator of gatherings in a farm here. It was a pretty good day, got some really old tombacs, one broken brass button, and what I think is the blade of an old oyster knife that came up from a hole that was nearly all shells. Looking around this area, carefully analyzing every signal finally produced an 81 ID in the midst of other iron, and I got my find of the day: Half of a 1728 King Philip V silver 1 Reale with excellent detail. It was almost on the surface. This is what the whole coin would look like: The "S" is Seville mint I believe. Always a thrill to get the old stuff, and the coin pretty much dates everything else. Here's the trash, some bits of copper pot, some nails and the ever present lead. Also found a 6,000 year old pull tab.
    26 points
  15. Hi all. Lost my password, couldn't be bothered resetting it lol so I've just been lurking on the work PC for a few weeks. Been out heaps this year - I'm up to 53 rings for 2024 so far, mainly thanks to a couple of untouched washouts that I accidentally uncovered. One of the first hunts for the year produced 24 rings, I'll post that in another thread. The very first water hunt for the year, back around Jan 5th, ish, produced 5 nice gold rings, including my 3rd, and biggest 22ct ring. I nicknamed this one "Boggle-eye", it looks very steampunk. What an odd design though? Our jeweller said it looks to be a natural emerald and natural ruby, but the ring has been crudely modified and the second stone was added at a later date, you can see 1 stone was set nicely but the other was simply "attached" with a bezel. Maybe there was a matching smaller stone that broke? It's hallmarked "22ct KDM". Fun fact, KDM is short for Cadmium which was only used in jewellery for a short time and is now banned in India due to being toxic when worn/worked with. From memory, it's the solder that contains it, not the gold alloy but I could be wrong on that. Either way, I'm scrapping it and reusing the stones. The day started out quiet, I bumped in to another fellow prospector snorkeling in the water using his Excal who managed to snag a ring as well. I was using the Manticore w/ 11" coil. The area was a flat sandy clayish rocky area which always holds lots of coins and jewellery. I used to dive it with my Nomad but with all this sand movement and calm water lately, it's really easy to snorkel there and just duck dive for each target which is awesome! Might be a bit different in winter though. The area photographed below is from months ago when I dived it with the D2 - it's very similar now but way more open instead of just the odd small opening in the sand. Also, not to knock the Deus too hard but... this Manticore is an absolute beast. D2 was super unstable and struggled to pick up a lot of targets due to how much iron was there. The Manticore has been an absolute dream to use. So stable and has incredible depth - the WG ring in the middle was about 1ft down in sand and still rang up beautifully. Highly recommend. Thanks for reading. HH
    25 points
  16. We've had some cold weather and wind and rain since I last posted finds, hope ya haven't missed me 😏 Last couple hunts I went on didn't produce much, I hunted some really tough spots with the 9" coil on my Deus 2, and did ok for where I was: Got a nice 1909 V Nickel, a few odd buttons, and a little compact that was gold plated on the side. Nothing in it. Today was a little different, I wasn't expecting anything really, especially after my last 2 hunts. I went to a field near my house where last year I dug a Draped Bust Half Cent, but really didn't find much else. This field is the "outback" of the place, it's a huge local farm. I'm so glad I have an off road golf cart. 😀 I'd hate to walk an extra mile or so just to get there, and back. Today's hunt was all about the 13", I was going to test a new program but switched quickly to my Relic program, it just wasn't the right place. I found one button in the first two hours, because I didn't find much the last times I came to this area I decided to grid search it. Ended up glad I did: I finished with 12 old buttons, a mix of Tombac, Brass, and ball buttons, almost all of the brass ones have "Colour" and "London" on them so they're almost as old as the Tombacs. I guess the ball buttons are a bit newer, one of them is squashed. I was hoping I would find an old coin, but nothing could have prepared me for what I found. I got a solid 85 in all directions, and thought I found an IHP or something, then this popped up: I thought, "oh, cool! Got a Half Reale!" I flipped it over after spraying this side with my water bottle and my jaw dropped. I expected to see good ol' King Charles of Spain, but then i noticed something, it was a Female? Never saw anything like that before. I saw the date, and the "IBE" and knew I had something special and pretty rare. It's an 1803 Draped Bust Silver Half dime. This is what it looked like originally, only 37,000 of them were minted: I think mine is the "Large 8" variation. It's a shame the reverse was completely worn down, these bring a commanding price. 😢 Holes also devalue. I couldn't believe it, yet again I've found something that tops most of the stuff I've found before, so this year is going very well. 😎 It wasn't just a surprise! Trash wasn't more than a small handful, if you want buttons like the ones above, you gotta dig every buck ball. 🙄
    25 points
  17. I know others have shared their gratitude in the past but I would like to do the same. Thanks Steve, for this forum. Thanks to all the contributers who's input, ideas, questions and expertise make this a great source of information, interest and an avenue to help pursue the hunt for buried treasure. I'm sharing a photo of my wife when she found her first ring; priceless. And one selfie with both of us wandering around Nevada having a great time looking for for some yellow stuff. Love learning more about detecting, the technical stuff, tips and tricks, geology and seeing some of the finds people have made. Again , thanks.
    25 points
  18. Timings refer to a Pulse Induction detector's code. The long string of code that a PI metal detector needs to use is often called a 'Pulse train' whereby the fractions of a second in each pulse need to have a switch on and switch off sequence. The switch on is a transmit phase and then a switch off is a receive phase. The various gaps between these, the sampling speed and the frequency determine the ability of the entire detector. Each individual string (train) of code for each purpose that the detector is designed for, is called a 'Timing'. For instance, on the GPX5000, you have timings for 'Fine', 'Sharp', 'Normal', 'Sensitive Smooth' etc. Each of these sets of code is designed to achieve a different capability on the detector. The word 'Timing' is used because the Pulse Induction detector type is referred to as a 'Time domain' detector. Time refers to the switch on-switch off sequence (so that a single loom coil can be used for both transmit AND receive), whereby a VLF or IB metal detector is termed a 'Frequency Domain' metal detector which requires 2 looms, one for transmit and one for receive. Hope my rambling makes some sense....
    24 points
  19. Hey Gang, I got some news that will make Doc's Detecting even more responsive to my customers than ever before. We have always prided ourselves on Great Customer Service and fast shipping. We have recently made some major purchases and plans for the future. To be clear I have never used any illegal drugs in my life, never even smoked. That's not that kind of high I'm talking about. But the ol' Doc ain't as young as he used to be. Carrying boxes up on the top of 12 foot high warehouse shelving, by having a 50 lb box on one shoulder and one hand on a shaky ladder is getting a bit too scary. So started looking at Fork Lifts, but I would have to widen my aisles and we really don't put things on pallets. We stack the boxes full of SWINGY THINGYS, SAGA Swing Arms etc on upper shelves, and as we need them we bring down a box, open it, put it in a large clear plastic bin that we pick from to fill orders. So in talking to the FORKLIFT company the salesman says, you don't need a Fork Lift, you need an ORDER PICKER. I said, "I am the ORDER PICKER!" He said no, let me send you a picture. So I went to California Wednesday and picked up my new ORDER PICKER. It's only 29 inches wide. The tray in front will carry over 200 lbs, so it will easily take 4 or 5 boxes of merchandise up with me to put on shelves or retrieve a couple off of a high shelf safely. The bottom below the tray will carry 360 lbs, so you can move a quantity of merchandise around the warehouse to where you want to store it. This would have been the bomb when I was putting up Christmas tree lights on the house this past Christmas Season. More BIG NEWS Below the Pictures. At the end of 2024 we will be moving to a NEW WAREHOUSE that I purchased that is being built as we speak. This Warehouse Complex, is really cool. There are 29 units and you actually purchase your unit. It's a gated complex. It's like a Home Owners Association. There is a really great Club House with roof top party area with bar-b-q grills and the like. Inside there are meeting rooms and areas that can be used for like a mini show. The Complex is called "The Stack." It is located 3 miles from my home in the hottest new area of Henderson. It is 1/2 mile from the Henderson airport and The Raiders Practice stadium and the two large Amazon Warehouses. I must be crazy to think I can keep doing this stuff forever, but I love it, and I see no end in sight. You guys have helped Doc's Detecting Supply grow at an amazing rate and I am eternally grateful. I thank you for your support and I will continue to try to bring you some of the best innovative accessories in the Detecting Prospecting Industry. Doc
    23 points
  20. My friend who owns a couple farms that I detect bought a new $90,000 toy (I mean tool) to work around the farm. He's been clearing out a lot of areas that I have been wanting to hit for years now. Around the original home site I did well finding the Spanish coin as well as the flying eagle. When I was there this morning there was an actual flying eagle sitting in the tree over top of me. They are all over these days. They don't plow the farm anymore. But they did plant a crop last year before that they had killed off all the grass in the field so now it's almost soil. That really made a lot of targets jump out of the ground that I hadn't heard before. Besides what I posted here there was the usual wheats, flat buttons and a mercury dime.. I hope this nice streak of weather continues! Happy hunting
    23 points
  21. If you have been following my posts and those of my detecting buddy, Bob - AKA F350Platinum, you will see that we have been having a great level of success, especially detecting colonial relic sites, over the past year or so. I attribute that to a combination of gaining more proficiency with the Deus 2, gaining access to some exciting new and productive permissions, and utilizing the latest Deus 2 updates (Version 1.1 and 2.0) which fixed most of the lingering issues with the Deus 2 since its release and added some great new features and performance. Even before these updates, we were having such great success with Deus 2 in the relic fields, coin shooting, and beach hunting, that other detectors just didn't get pulled into action unless we wanted to check something out or run some sort of comparison. I have limited opportunities to detect, so when I do get a chance to detect with Bob, I want to make the most of it and not be out there learning some new detector or messing around with unfamiliar settings. About a year ago, I had purchased the Nox 900. On the surface, ML seemed to have addressed most the remaining shortcomings associated with the Nox 800, improved the shaft system, and added some features like adding Deep Pitch (DP) audio as a feature for all detecting modes. They also changed the Target ID scaling and also enabled compatibility with all legacy Nox OEM and third party accessory coils, including my favorite Coiltek Nox 10x5. All of these changes and the ready availability of the Nox 900 vs. the Manticore and the fact that my 800 was no longer in warranty, convinced me to pick up the Nox 900. Got it into the field, and let's just say, I was not impressed. The main issue I had was getting it to run stable at a reasonable sensitivity level (I like to run just above 20 out of 25 sensitivity). It was really chirpy, especially in DP audio and running it along side the Deus 2 was like night and day. Even after a few other tries, it never quite clicked with me. And it started gathering dust. With the 8X5.5" M8 coil release becoming imminent (or so I thought), I decided to invest in the Manticore over the summer. Took it to the beach, and it was just OK and perhaps also a little chirpy. Again, I simply fell back and continued to swing the Deus 2, while the Manticore sat idle. Finally, a few weeks back, I was finally able to get my M8 coil for the Manticore, and after having much success the last several outings with the Deus 2 13" elliptical and 9" round coils at a our most popular and productive areas, felt that some of the more dense iron patches at these sites could benefit from being scanned with the smaller M8. The area we are detecting heavily is not readily accessible to our vehicles, so we have to hike a ways across a couple of fields to get there. I have a Rhino Skin vest with a sizable and long back compartment that provides the ideal setup to carry detecting gear (either my Deus 2 and its two coils or the Manticore with the M8), food, water, and "just in case" items for several hours of "unsupported" detecting. Above, you can see my Rhino Skin vest/pack holding the Manticore and M8 coil and also the XP Deus 2 9" coil/shaft. This was going to be the Manticore's first relic hunting field test. Despite, the limited swing coverage of the Manticore with the M8 coil, I decided to go ahead and make the trek to the detecting area swinging the Manticore. For this session, I decided to keep it simple. I had the detector set up in AT General with Enhanced audio, Default tone settings (2-Region, All tones, variable pitch). After noise cancelling and ground balancing, I set sensitivity at about 23 and left recovery speed and discrimination and ferrous limits at the defaults. I was not walking slow enough to ensure sufficient coil coverage, but targets are few and widely scattered so I was not expecting to recover anything except by chance. Mainly, the walk afforded an opportunity for me to get used to the Manticore tones, ferrous tones, ground feedback in horseshoe (no discrimination) and responsivity again as I had only briefly used it beach hunting and run through various settings in only my test garden. On the trek, I recovered a couple pieces of miscellaneous brass and a modern bullet casing. Met up with Bob in the field who was already there and who was detecting some fringe areas with little success. We started to make our way over to the area and my first keeper target was a fired musket ball. We zig-zagged to different parts of the hot spot area and thick iron and started to do our thing. I recovered some horse saddle brass and more miscellaneous brass pieces. Then the buttons started to pop, brass, gold gilt, silver plate and tombac. I also dug some larger brass (perhaps a partial musket butt plate and a mangled buckle). My final Manticore keeper was a gold plated cufflink (complete with the post and toggle clasp) with an interesting flowering vine design. The Manticore M8 did not disappoint. I had an outing with similar results to my previous trips to this area with the Deus 2. I like the expressive audio, the ability to quickly switch discrimination off and on using the trusty horseshoe button to lessen audio fatigue, the additional information provided by the 2-D target trace display, and obviously the slightly improved separation ability of the M8 coil vs. the Deus 9" round. I got used to the different target IDs, the ferrous falsing tells, and target trace clues to make dig decisions. But frankly, the keepers were pretty obvious, and I dug little junk that fooled me. Finally, the Manticore ergonomics with that M8 coil are fantastic, to the point that once I started swinging my Deus 2 with the 13" elliptical coil again, I really felt the weight and toe-heavy balance. For the trip back to the vehicles, I switched back to the Deus 2 with the 13" coil for better coverage of the large fields and managed another flat button and a rivet and some modern bullets. We quickly surveyed a new site to finish the day and I managed to recover a few surprises from that field, which was had a lot of iron contamination - apparently an old house site. I snagged a .52 Sharps minie ball, a silver Rosie ('64), a flat button, a wheatie, a portion of a tiny silver spoon, and a part of a parasol slider mechanism. All in all, not bad for a first relic outing with the Manticore - I have a lot more to learn and tweak - and not a bad quick survey of a promising new field. The perfect detecting weather, great company, and awesome finds made for another fantastic detecting day. As is our tradition, Bob and I reviewed the day and tentatively planned future adventures while drinking his awesome post hunt coffee. His ornate sword guard and British Colonial period regimental button were really the finds of the day. Bottom Line: Bob has some amazing Colonial sites and the Manticore and M8 coil certainly did not disappoint in a challenging iron environment...looks like I will be bringing both the Manticore and Deus 2 along on future digs.
    23 points
  22. Only $7500 or $5500 on sale!
    23 points
  23. It weighs less than 4 lbs, it has a display that actually tells me something about the target like a target ID, I can easily see that display, it has easily accessible controls, it has inexpensive non-proprietary battery options, great coil selection, from all accounts so far it has good build quality and most of all, it appears to work just like the small amount of marketing information claimed it would. What other PI, no matter what it costs, can do all of that???
    23 points
  24. I've made another video, this one I'm not making public on Youtube and just having it as an unlisted video as it needs context, I went back behind my house to the river where I was in the first video, but there is an offshoot creek that's surrounded by willows and other bush that made it a bit easier to get out of the wind, the creek was partially dried out so worked well for shelter so hopefully the winds better in this one. Now the reason it needs context is the Algoforce speaker isn't as loud as the GPX 6000 speaker, and the 6000 has really boosted audio on targets, making them sound a lot better, much like if I connected the Steelphase SP01 to the Algoforce it would have the same loud target sounds. I think in wind like this I would benefit from putting on my aptX LL transmitter and using the Avantree Torus, so I'll be doing this for detecting tomorrow as no doubt the hot wind will still be about. The pinpoint is very loud with the threshold as high as it is, I've since used my Torus neckband with aptX LL transmitter and pinpoints a much nicer volume. I run both detectors over the targets sitting on the ground, I think the GPX 6000 did better, but not $6000 better if you know what I mean 😉 I think it averaged an inch or so deeper overall with all targets combined. Some were so close to the same as an estimation while others it did a fair bit better. Obviously, this is just swinging a coil in the air with no measurements, so means next to nothing other than the detectors were able to respond on them and how well they sounded on them in that circumstance. This is also a 10" coil vs a 12x7" coil, so next time I'll use a smaller coil on the Algoforce, I've not even tried any other coils yet, the X-coils 12x6" semi spiral is probably the closest fit, almost the same as the 12x7" so it would be good to use that combination. My Sadie hasn't arrived yet, it was quicker to get the Algoforce from Australia than the Sadie from 3 hours' drive away, nuts! but I don't expect it to be better than any of the spirals for sensitivity anyway. Either way, a lot of coils need tested out on it yet to work out the optimal coil for small gold, the 10" was just the first one I threw on it as I really like that coil. I think once I get away from the powerlines if I can crank that gain up on the Algoforce it's going to be a pretty good small gold weapon. It was a bit ratty in the video from the powerlines and my really high threshold trying to make it louder to overcome the wind, and running the gain at 26 out of 30. I think If I had headphones or the Torus I could put the gain more in the low 20's and get the rock stable threshold, with a much lower threshold volume and have a nicer running machine with the same sensitivity to the gold, I just did this to try make it easier to hear in the wind. In the video I do a basic Target ID test on a coin by showing the ID of the coin, then I bury it in the gravels and show the Target ID, rock solid stable and correct, pretty impressive. I think I'm going to love this detector on the beach with a bigger coil. I really think for the price this thing is a game changer, it's going to allow so many people to move onto a PI and take up serious gold detecting without breaking the bank. The beach/relic type people I think will appreciate it too, I'm going to love it on the beaches here where VLF's struggle with black sand. The thing I didn't even think about is this river is full of hot rocks, I didn't notice any. That's not saying it's immune, the hot rocks in this river play havoc with VLF's but PI's can handle a majority of these ones fine. We'll see once I get to gold country how it goes there.
    23 points
  25. Some of you may have noticed that the Cpt hasn't posted recently. He underwent surgery Tuesday for the removal of a brain tumor and is now in recovery which might take some time. He's a great Detectorist and a wizard on operating his D2. Each time we detect together he always finds twice the stuff that I do. He's also the Newsletter Editor and member of our local detecting club, The Pikes Peak Adventure League, here in Colorado Springs. Keep him and his family in your thoughts and prayers. Thanks.
    22 points
  26. One of my customers just shared last weeks finds. 4 days in AZ swinging the GPZ-7000 and recovers 42 pieces. 39+ grams of beautiful chunky nuggets. Largest was a 1/4 oz'er. Depths of the varying nuggets was from 10" to 24" deep. Just goes to show there is still gold out there. If you're new to the game and want to speed up your game, contact me as we have a 3 Day Field Training session coming up in April at famous Rye Patch, NV.
    22 points
  27. What’s all the excitement about a $1500 PI when my beloved GPX-6000 does just fine on tiny gold. My recently acquired (used) GPZ-7000 easily puts my back into traction bars while I swing a boat anchor and dig beyond the depths of modern man with a handheld pick, to get the rarest of gold, a 1/2 ounce nugget. Why do I say rarest of gold. Because the majority of folks in the US who put a 2nd mortgage on their house to purchase a GPZ-7000.. has yet to find that half ounce nugget. Now I’m taking pain pills to manage the beating from the ZED’s capabilities and lack of ergonomics… as well as from the old lady who seen the credit card bill. We know this new AlgoForce E1500 is not going to perform any better than what many of us here on DP already swing. Or do we??? Who wants tiny bits, specimens and reef gold anyway? Do those kinds of Au even classify as gold and register to those around us? Most folks only know what a solid gold nugget looks like, right? Show them anything else and they just role their eyes and wonder why you spent $4000, $5000, even $6500 or the crazy few (more than I realized who would), spent $8000 and up to $10K. Which begs me to wonder again and out loud this time so I can hear myself. What am I missing? Well, I’m the odd duck here in the crowd most of the time anyway. I pretty much speak my mind and offend a few when doing so. When it comes to using a metal detector, I seem to be a lone wolf in my style and desire to swing. I say that because I swing many states, and pursue a variety of treasures. I do like to specialize in gold though and since I enjoy the hunt and travel, I make the time to reach far places while trying to collect a variety of gold occurrences. I’m not the norm, for that is a sure thing. I like collecting all gold that can be found with a metal detector. And…I seem to find my share of gold, a great deal of the others miss. Is it because they are lacking knowledge or skill and possibly both. I’m not sure? I do know that my finds have increased substantially since I learned the importance of how different kinds of gold responds to detectors and their technologies. One of the things that immediately caught my attention about this new detector being released, was mentioned by our friend Nenad. On 1/25/2024 at 11:51 PM, PhaseTech said: If you want to find small gold as well as specimens and reefy gold, then the AlgoForce E1500 is worth a look. I’m licking my chops and counting the eggs (golden eggs) my roster is going to provide me. How about you.
    22 points
  28. After a couple of days testing the E1500, I think it's pretty close to a sdc 2300 in performance but lighter, way better ergonomics, a lot more coil options and a lot more control with the settings . Not to mention half the price if you have a power bank and your own coils. It packs up as small or possibly smaller than the sdc 2300, so will be ideal for hiking in the mountains or the gray nomads caravanning around the countryside and wanting a quality detector. The big test is tomorrow as I'll be pitting it against the gpx 6000. The E1500 with a 9" round coiltek elite against the gpx 6000 with a 9" round coiltek goldhawk. I sort of know what to expect but should be interesting. 4 gold modes on the E1500 compared to 2 on the gpx 6000.🤔
    22 points
  29. Sounds like most of the detectors and coils announced in the last ten years! My crystal ball says GPZ 8000 for $12,000 announced by end of the year, available in 2025. Detects a 36 ounce nugget deeper than a GPZ 7000. Just that one nugget will easily pay for it! The E1500 will be available for purchase in states within 90 days. If I am wrong on any of that I will fully refund every dime you have paid for my prediction.
    22 points
  30. Many years ago I signed on to this forum while I was out of commission as far as metal detecting. I started traveling to Quartzite in 1995 during the winter months. I had read many articles about all the gold that could be found. I joined GPAA and LDMA and bought a Goldmaster 2. I searched for three winters and only found the usual junk. That third winter I had a week left before heading home and hit six sub gram pickers in a wash. When I got back to Montana I went to visit Bud Guthrie near Helena, Montana. He examined my Goldmaster and said the coil was faulty and sold me a Fisher Goldbug. I found three ounces of gold the next winter near Quartzite. On my way home, I stopped at Rye Patch. It had rained and I couldn't balance the Goldbug (lack of knowledge on my part). Anyway, the next morning I watched some detectorists out detecting nuggets left and right. They had the SD2100. Again, I went to Bud and asked if he could get me an SD2100. Armed with the Goldbug and the 2100, I never looked back. Well, I finally found ground that I cannot keep my 2100 quiet with all the magnetite. I know there is gold that I cannot differentiate from deep hot rocks. After seeing Steve's introduction to the Axiom, I finally made the leap. It came yesterday but we still have too much snow right now. I'll just continue to watch the videos and be ready to hit my favorite area this spring. The 2100 has been very good to me over the many years with over 50 ounces. The largest at 6.5oz. Reese has been a great inspiration with his never give up attitude. So many of you on this forum have taught me a great deal. Keep it up!
    21 points
  31. Here are the finds from 3-4 hunts over the last week or so. They are certainly not like anything Mr. and Mrs. TTT have been finding but I can only show what I find. It has been quite a long time since I found a watch and this one was bouncing around in the waves. There is really not too much good stuff but there is one 14K/1.6g earring and one .925/2.4g ring. It is just time to show I've been out, good or bad. Here is the hunt from today. It is an old ring that didn't clean very good. We think it is a crystal in there and certainly not a diamond.
    21 points
  32. Been thinking some more about this. I’m convinced this detector is a real winner and that there are going to be lots of owners looking for a forum home. I’m also sure this is not the end but just the beginning for AlgoForce with more models in the future. So I’m going to go ahead and set up a new forum, and move all the existing threads there by the end of the day.
    21 points
  33. Hi Gerry, I think it goes back to what most can afford. Everyone would love to own a GPX 6000 or even a GPZ 7000, but most know there are other priorities for most that come before a super, high end detector. I get calls all the time about how someone would love to own a GPZ, but the wife would leave them. Historically, the GPX 4500 and 5000 were the best sellers, more so after they were both discounted down to $2499 and $3995.00. I still today get inquiries on them, but both long discontinued here in the US. Keep in mind also, the GPX can really probably find about 85% off all the gold that is out there today. There will always be nuggets that are too small, crystalline, too deep ,,,,, and the list goes on and on .... If most would just focus on what they can find, rather than what they might be missing! I could "what if" all the time. The big advantage I see with the AlgoForce 1500 is the price and all the aftermarket coils you can use with it. I think if Minelab continued to carry and support the GPX 4500 @ $2499, we wouldn't probably be having these discussions today. Just my thoughts,
    21 points
  34. After following this thread on the Algoforce E1500 I got a bit excited and ordered one direct from their website. Turned up today. First impression was wow its tiny. Light as a feather and fits into a carry bag that's about the size of a shaving bag but twice as long. Very easy to assemble, sturdy and well made. Not sure about the coil connecting yoke on the end of the bottom shaft, different design altogether. Time will tell I suppose. Bit disappointed with the smaller headphone jack, nothing a cheap adapter won't fix . I'll eventually rig up a wireless set up anyway so no big dramas there. Turned up a day earlier than expected so I'm now busy charging my powerbank and cleaning coils and connectors to test tomorrow morning. Got my 8x6" Sadie, 9" round coiltek elite, 12" round nuggetfinder evolution , 14x9 " coiltek blitz and 11" minelab commander to test on it first up. A good mix of shapes, sizes, windings and brands . How good is it to have all these coil options again . Looks like a busy weekend ahead. Exciting times.🤞
    21 points
  35. I couldn't agree with Steve and Karelian more. This whole has to be the best or shouldn't exist attitude is somewhat bizarre, we'd all be driving Lamborghini's or something if we followed that chain of thought through life, yet what do most people drive? very cheap cars by comparison. It's the same with metal detectors, a majority of people aren't running the highest price models there is and a big hole was in the market where this detector slots right in are people that didn't even buy one as they were too expensive. I've been hoping for something like this for a long time, I took on the QED and tried my best to have it fill that role but it really wasn't up to the standard of a professionally built metal detector, more of a DIY home built using parts from an electronics store, something that looks like it was slapped together from one of the electronics kits from the 70's and 80's and while it's performance was OK, especially on smaller shallow gold or on larger coins and possible gold that were quite deep depending on how you had the bias set on the detector it was missing too much to make it a viable choice for most. The price was right, the product wasn't. Since then, I was hoping Garrett, Fisher or Nokta would be doing it, I've been trying to encourage Nokta to take it on knowing there is a big gap in the market, Nokta appear like they're well on their way but they don't yet have PI experience other than a pinpointer but they have a proven track record of excelling when they focus on a product. Fisher is still tinkering away, well not so much Fisher as Alexandre although he may not even end up with Fisher and who knows if and when his AQ Gold will ever hit the market. Out of nowhere comes Algoforce with basically the product I've been hoping for, it ticks the boxes. And the focus of detectors now is smaller gold with that being the reason the 6000 is so popular now, people are finding lots of little stuff and going home with something in their bottles, the 6000, the Axiom, they're not extremely deep machines, but are hot on small gold, if you want depth on big deep gold there are plenty of options, right back to the SD's or grab a GPX 4500/5000 and big coil. For someone on a small budget they have the option now of owning something like a used GPX and an Algoforce and still have plenty of change in their pocket from a 6000 or 7000 purchase, between the two detectors they have most bases covered. Something I will appreciate is the fixed ground balance, being in milder soils the 6000 and its tracking is a frustration. I've complained about the lack of a way to "fix" the balance from the start so this to me is a bonus, the manual ground grab is fantastic for me, and something the QED has tried yet failed to have for years. This machine is lightyears ahead of a QED and will likely be the final nail in the coffin for the QED, it's all the QED should have been, and professionally built to go with it and priced perfectly, with its GPX coil support I can't see any reason for anyone to buy a QED anymore. I have now spoken to Ruifeng, what a great guy, very clued on and I can see their detector being a great success, He's as enthusiastic about their detector being as good as it can be as I am about it existing, all the gray nomads driving around in their Caravan's that want to have a go at looking for gold but can't justify or afford the price of a Minelab machine, they now have a great option, people like me that hunt a lot of small gold and would like fixed ground balance and have a good selection of GPX coils already, perfect! Let's not forget, this detector is a high-performance PI for the price of a good VLF and will bring to life a lot of peoples old GPX coils sitting in their cupboards as it exceeds the GPX 5000 on small gold. X-coils are open to producing GPX coils again now with this detector on the market, I can't wait to try my 10" spiral on it, I'll have a Algoforce as soon as I can. It appears to have good Detection modes to find a variety of size nuggets. Ultra-Fine Gold: This is the go-to choice for detecting gold nuggets of all sizes and is suitable for most situations. When used in combination with the Nugget Finder 8"x6" Sadie coil or similar-sized coils, it excels, even in highly mineralised soils. This combination is strongly recommended for locating small gold nuggets in various ground conditions. Fine Gold: Fine Gold mode reduces sensitivity to mineralised soil and may not detect very small gold nuggets. When paired with the Nugget Finder 12"x8" Mono coil or similar-sized coils, this mode performs exceptionally well, even in highly mineralised soils. It's a top choice for finding small to medium gold nuggets in different ground conditions. Normal Gold: This mode decreases sensitivity to highly mineralised soil and may not detect small gold nuggets. When used with the Nugget Finder 14"x9" Mono coil or similar-sized coils, it delivers outstanding performance, even in highly mineralised soils. It is highly recommended for locating medium to large gold nuggets in various ground conditions. Large Gold: Reserve Large Gold mode for use in extremely mineralised soil with high levels of wet salt. When used with coils larger than the Nugget Finder 14"x9" Mono coil, this mode excels, even in highly mineralised soils. This combination is highly recommended for locating large gold nuggets in different ground conditions. Although the four detection modes are specially designed for detecting gold nuggets, they can also be used for finding jewellery, coins, and other treasures on the beach. With a small coil like the Nugget Finder 8"x6" Sadie, use Ultra-Fine or Fine Gold mode for fine treasures. For a large coil like the 14"x9" Evolution Mono, employ Normal or Large Gold mode for deep beach discoveries. No ground balance is needed. As a PI detector, the AlgoForce E1500 naturally rejects seawater signals; the detection mode dictates the level of rejection, ranging from Ultra-Fine Gold to Large Gold, becoming more aggressive.
    21 points
  36. I'm back again. This was maybe my 3rd and 4th hunt for the year back in early Jan. To keep it short (i'm supposed to be working lol) Was gonna go back in the water where I found the large 22ct ring in my last post, but wifey convinced me to drop her off at "our good spot" before I went there. Not wanting to leave her alone, I decided to just hang out and do the same spot. Especially after seeing the washout on the shore which had already uncovered at a 1/2 tide. Once it got down to almost the lowest point, we went out in to the water. Immediately, bang, bang, bang, rings, watches, silver, bracelets, you name it! Hell, she even found a Google phone!! Although there wasn't much left of it. The silver dumbbell thing is actually a early 1900s sterling silver baby rattle! You'd think after doing this same spot for 3 years I would've uncovered such a large silver target already, but apparently not. It was really deep under the rocks. Anyhow, I think we went out for 2 nights, maybe 3, and this is my haul. See the shiny ring next to the coin? (not the flat shaped one, the one above it) God I thought that was gold! It was stained by the yellow clay and came up BRAND NEW. Most silver we find is tarnished, like the others you see, but this one must have only been there a few days. It rang up super high though, which immediately told me it was probably gold plated silver. When I got home, the yellow stain buffed off and yeah it's super clean 925 silver. The RAAF tag was cool. After a lot of help from a researcher, we found the owner. He was a RAAF Engineer who was 1 of a handful who graduated in about '71. He's in his late 80's now and living in rural western Australia. He was happy to have it back, though not sure when he lost it but recalls visiting the local pub once which is likely when. Casio watch doesn't work sadly, neither does the Tissot. Oh well. All up, only the front 3 are gold. The rest are mainly silver or stainless/titanium. I think being right after new year, they hadn't had a chance to rot away yet, so they ring up really nice. I think getting in to winter, they start to rust away and break down so we mainly find gold and silver in winter. Cheers. HH
    20 points
  37. Thank you for the kind comment and thanks in return. All I can do is send out the party invitations but it is the people at the party that make it fun. I do think we have a top notch membership here, in both knowledge and helpful behavior.
    20 points
  38. Got out to the lowered lake on Saturday which happened to be my birthday. Got this ring which wad missing the stone. It doesn’t have any markings anywhere, but it looks like it tests at 14k. I also got a small .925 heart bracelet and 925 stud earring which I forgot to get pics of but will add later. No silver coins this time but 9 wheats and a buffalo nickel. As a bonus got $6 something in clad. more pics of the ring. All shown are 14k Acid test. Left to right: 10k, 14k, 18k acid A muddy mess. Very, very hard to get around to detect in that slimy, sinky clay! Another ring pic Here’s a pic of the bracelet and earring after I attempted cleaning them.
    20 points
  39. In the common imagination, beach hunting is based on the first few feet of shoreline, sometimes at the top, sometimes at the edge of an eroded step, sometimes in flooded pools after a decent tide. All of this in my area is out of the question and being forced to enter the water and totally submerge, today, after three sessions I summarize what I am observing. On the first day, in a spot I hadn't been to in over 10 years, I pulled out a triple ring and amazingly not far from where I found a twin 10 years earlier. Finally, the first piece of 2024🤔. On the second day, a really thin ring, different spot, and really unusual water depth. It all ends today, with the third session in the same spot as yesterday, but this time even deeper at about 5 meters and very far from the shore. A man's wedding ring, after a century of other much thinner and lighter finds. The outer sandbar may remain the final frontier. Rarely, pits can open at such depths, and if they do, it is generally because of a play of currents with which one should not mess around. I am considering a floating platform of the bodyboard kind, to be kept on the surface as a safety device for a return to shore or at least to have something to cling to effortlessly and return to shore with the help of the board and fins. By the way, finally some shines.
    20 points
  40. This sure looks interesting, a whole lot more profession than the QED, and if Nenad is the agent then it already has credibility. Sure would like to get my hands on one for some testing, but know that Simon is bound to yield to his insatiable urge and add to his already extensive detector collection to give one the Kiwi 'flypoop' test. I would like to see how it handles a big coil in Aussie conditions.
    20 points
  41. The Algoforce manual suggests end users contact them with suggestions of improvements they could introduce, so I thought I'd test it out, see the caption below from the manual, "Bug Report and Feature Request AlgoForce highly values customer feedback as a crucial means of enhancing our products. To ensure a seamless feedback process, we encourage you to reach out to us directly via email at admin@algoforce.com.au. If you come across any bugs or have ideas for new features that could enhance your metal detecting experience, please send us an email with a detailed description of the issue or requested feature. Kindly include the hardware serial number and firmware version of your detector (located in the Miscellaneous setting) in your email. Our dedicated team of developers will promptly review your feedback and respond to you accordingly. We appreciate your contribution and look forward to working together to improve our products." I contacted Algoforce with a suggestion of an improvement on the 8th of February, The pinpoint volume I thought was unnecessarily loud, it's nice to have the general audio volume quite high when using the speaker or the Avantree Torus neck speaker which really made the pinpoint mode roar, in fact I have the volume maxed out most of the time, however the pinpoint volume in that instance was extremely loud, so I suggested an independent pinpoint volume control setting to adjust pinpoint's volume and leave the general volume the same. I am guessing headphone users would have found the pinpoint volume rather loud too. It is now the 13th of February and to my surprise this morning I woke up to an email from Algoforce with a new firmware update to try out, now incorporating independent volume for the pinpoint function. You can also now adjust the vibration separately from the audio volume, so you could have high pinpoint vibration with low pinpoint volume, or high pinpoint volume with low or no vibration, and the same goes in normal detector mode, no vibration with high volume, high vibration with low volume etc. To adjust vibration you just hold down the volume - or + buttons rather than pressing them. The new firmware release notes: Release Notes for AlgoForce E1500 Software v1.0.8: 1. The activation time for a long key press function has been reduced from 1.5 seconds to 0.7 seconds. For example, the time duration between pressing and holding the ground balance key and the commencement of actual ground balancing is now 0.7 seconds, as opposed to 1.5 seconds. Other functions requiring a long key press are similarly affected, including vibration adjustment and auto frequency scan. 2. In version 1.0.7, Pinpoint mode and the main detection mode shared the same volume and vibration controls. With the introduction of v1.0.8, Pinpoint mode now features independent volume and vibration controls separate from the main detection mode. Users can customize their preferred volume and vibration settings in either mode. Furthermore, the volume and vibration settings in both modes are saved during power down for convenience. I'm now testing this firmware out, I must say the upgrade process was simple and quick, I've recorded some video of the volume control function in use to see here, and soon they will have the firmware available for download. Very happy with their quick response, especially when at the moment they're super busy. It doesn't get better than contacting a manufacturer and being able to talk directly to the engineer behind the detector. So here is a video of the firmware update process, and some basic testing of the new volume control function. I'm pretty impressed by this, how quick they were to respond and do the modification, and it works just as I hoped it would. The screen in the video has the backlight turned off, in the sun, no backlight and the screens still easy enough to see, in fact I didn't even notice it was off, it looks a little darker in the video than in reality, which is why I didn't notice.
    19 points
  42. We have a new player on the field in the form of AlgoForce and their new E1500 detector. One thing that is not getting as much attention as I would expect from a PI - full range target conductivity id. From the owners manual: "For experienced PI users accustomed to estimating nugget size from audio cues, the AlgoForce E1500 can also help to estimate size or conductivity through its stable conductive target ID (0-99), even in highly mineralized soils. High single frequency VLF detectors typically struggle with signals on wet ocean sand, where PI detectors are far more capable of detecting through the salt mineralization. Capitalizing on its UltraFine pulse induction technology and stable conductive target ID (0-99), the AlgoForce E1500 excels on the beach, proving to be a versatile tool for searching fine jewelry, coins, rings, and other treasures." (Emphasis added) The discrimination feature kicks in when using the pinpoint mode. Again, from the manual: VIII. Pinpoint detected target (if needed) Enter the Pinpoint UI by pressing the Left/Pinpoint button in the Main Detection UI. In the Pinpoint UI, adjust Sensitivity with the Minus or Plus button. To retune the detection threshold due to ground variation or temperature drift, press the Left/Pinpoint button as needed. Perform Auto GB if needed by holding the Right/Auto GB button. Return to the Main Detection UI by pressing the Return/Auto FS button. Pinpoint is a non-motion mode where the coil doesn't have to move to indicate a target. The detection signal gets stronger as the coil approaches the target, causing the audio (if audio output is on) or vibration (if vibration mode is on) to intensify. The Conductive Target ID (0-99) displayed in the Pinpoint UI remains stable even in highly mineralized soils. A higher number indicates a larger or more conductive target. To obtain an accurate target ID, it is recommended to follow these steps: Move the coil away from but close to the target. Ensure the coil is resting on the ground surface and press the Left/Pinpoint button to retune. After that, slide the coil on the ground surface until the target is positioned just below the center of the coil. The target ID is also useful for assessing the target's shape. If the target ID fluctuates significantly when the coil is moved slightly off but still above the target, it likely indicates an irregularly shaped target, such as a bottle cap or a nail with a large head. Target conductivity is not the same as VLF discrimination in that both ferrous and non-ferrous are conductive. Stuff that is small or low conductive reads low numbers and stuff that is large or high conductive reads high numbers. Ferrous can read anywhere depending on various factors, so the usefulness of the system largely depends on the nature and mix of targets you are working with. Nowhere does the AlgoForce manual refer to ferrous versus non-ferrous discrimination. It specifically refers to the Conductive Target ID - in other words, a measurement of how conductive the target is whether ferrous or non-ferrous. Most GBPI users have savvied to the fact that the high and low tones give a rough indication of target size. A hi or hi-lo tone usually means small or low conductive targets and a low or lo-hi tone usually means large or high conductive targets. You get ferrous either way, just small ferrous on one side and large ferrous on the other. However, in certain gold locations concentrating on hi or hi-lo tones only can be remarkably effective at cherry picking gold nuggets out of a nail pit. Most gold I find almost always gives a hi-lo tone. Minelab employs a method where targets blank if ferrous, and Garrett the target grunts if ferrous. The Garrett method is preset, the Minelab method can employ a variable control depending on the model. What makes the AlgoForce different is instead of the "this or that", "yes or no" answer of two categories you get a full range indication, which with experience should lead to more nuance in what can be dug and what can be ignored. PI discrimination is not the same as VLF discrimination. There are different aspects to it that require a savvy operator. There are a lot of half truths and incorrect statements tossed around by people who don't know much on the subject. One of the most common claims I hear is that PI disc only works at shallow depths, and that the things you have to do to implement it give up the extra depth that is the reason for using a PI in the first place. This is based on some versions of PI discrimination and so can be true, but also reflects that the person making such statements is not well versed in all aspects of the subject. You can indeed discriminate to full depth with a PI, and in fact that is the only way I have been doing it for almost 20 years now. For more details on how pulse discrimination works see my long analysis at the thread below. No, it’s not VLF discrimination, but you’d be amazed what good PI operators can do with the capability they do have. We have a winner in the Under 4 Pound, Under $2000 GBPI Challenge! AlgoForce E1500 Specifications and User Manuals Visit the new AlgoForce Metal Detector Forum
    19 points
  43. Had the great fortune to get out with Bob again to explore a new time machine, er field. I've commented before on Bob's situation being a detectorist's paradise. He lives in an area steeped in history dating back to Colonial times and older if you take into account the artifacts of Native American presence that pre-dated the Colonists. Furthermore, he has convenient access to history right out his front door or he can choose from a number of permissions that each are unique in terms of the finds they produce both in type and timeframe. Finally, from a technical perspective, the digging is ideal consisting vast flat farm fields of harvested soybeans or corn and sandy unmineralized soil. The choices that are available for selecting an outing is like having a time machine you can you can dial back to just about any point in US history. Pre-Colonial or Colonial - no problem, War of 1812 - it's there, Civil War - not plentiful, but definitely present, Victorian - check, early 20th century - you bet. This time out was a new field that had a mixture of almost all of the above and we were able to benefit from what it was willing to give up. It was a long, exhausting but fantastic digging day and I appreciate that Bob let me accompany him on the new field and appreciated his advance research and surveys that enabled us to efficiently tackle the immense acreage. Bob had been out already getting a few targets in an adjacent area we had hit previously waiting for me to finally get there after my 2 hour drive. I was able to get the day going by digging a keeper flat cuff button on my first recovery. At that point it was game on for both of us. Bob got on the board with the first coin, a very nice 1907 IHP. We both dug a few brass whatzits and then Bob dug a rare (to this area) dropped Minie Ball. Great, we were less than an hour in and covered Colonial, Civil War, Victorian, and early 20th century. It's unusual for a site in that area to give up finds that spanned such a wide time frame. That increased our motivation because we knew that there were going to likely be additional surprises. And we were not disappointed. We recovered mostly a lot of miscellaneous brass targets, some identifiable, others had us scratching our heads. I managed a couple of firsts and was elated. I managed to get on the silver board with a Mercury dime to keep my silver streak alive, dug some miscellaneous brass stuff including a heel plate and some pocket knife parts and briefly chatted with the adjacent property owner (really nice guy) Then we headed to an iron hotspot that Bob had previously identified. There we started alternating horse tack finds that confirmed the area was likely a stable. I got a nice star shaped decorative piece and a part of a fancy bit boss. Then I got surprised with one of my firsts - a Civil War Block A coat button face that once belonged to a Confederate Artillery Officer. Only my third Confederate civil war button piece and first Civil War artillery button piece. I recovered some more miscellaneous brass and aluminum junk. I then recovered a local aluminum trade token that rang up as a 91. Then my second "first". I have recovered a lot of silver coins and especially silver quarters of many varieties (Capped Bust, Seated, Standing Liberty, and Washington) but never a Barber. In fact, I mentioned my Barber drought to Bob when I recovered the 1919 Merc. We started detecting an old road bed on the site and I finally broke my Barber drought with a 1903 Barber quarter. A common date, but I was as happy getting that one under my belt as the Spanish 2-Reale I recovered a month earlier. I wrapped up with an early 1900's Army General Service button and a 1944 P silver war nickel and Bob came home with an early 1800's silver spoon handle. Hadn't had a three-silver day in quite awhile. It made the post-hunt coffee taste great. Thanks, yet again, Bob, for giving me the opportunity to add some firsts and bucket listers to my collection. Tested some new gear that Bob has also discussed including the RCDigs mount on the standard shaft and also some limited testing of a tilted RCDigs mount variant for @steveg's excellent Carbon Fiber shaft setup that I primarily use for beach and water hunting. I need to get some more swing time but I like both set ups a lot. No more worrying about the remote popping off, and the angled variant I am using on Steve's CF shaft system provides great visibility of the screen and accommodates the Deus 2 waveguide aerial well. Until next time - Happy Hunting.
    19 points
  44. I've neglected quite a few places due to the fact that a couple of beaches have been very productive. Its all about priorities with me, some fields are only just drying out & i'm not inclined to go to most places until cultivation in April or thereabouts. On Saturday I went a little further than I normally do as we've had some massive tides and wind in the right direction. The section I had in mind is backed by dunes of considerable height with clay & peat in the lower layers. I have removed a vast amount from here over the years, it was a popular place in the era of early motor cars and before, not so much anymore. What I was faced with was a massive tide that had cut right into the dune leaving a huge area of disturbance. I full well knew there would be a lot of stuff but wasn't quite prepared for the sheer quantity. Took the Deus with the 9", knowing the place well t was right for the job. Instantly I put the detector at the base of the dunes, I could see coins strewn along the base on the gritty black or red layer with a good smattering of wartime iron too. They were all from Victorian through to 1950's- perfect, plus a few George III/IV Difficult to explain, but multiple signals under the coil at once was somewhat overwhelming as all were positive. It took a few minutes for me to switch into fully auto mode. For the next 3 1/2 hours, I dug constantly as well as eyeballing many on the surface. Literally they were all over the place, but I kept up a strict discipline of straight overlapping lines pulling stuff every few seconds. I could see there were quite a few silver coins along with other stuff. In these situations, my recovery rate was as fast as I could go, on & on. At the end my bag was really heavy with mostly coins but with a couple of rings thrown in too, one with a decent Opal. By dark I gave up totally worn out. Back at it next day I hit exactly the same spot with similar results, but not quite in the same numbers. I noticed that the coins were mostly smaller than the previous day which is normal on a second less intense pass. Day 3 was interesting as many more small bits came up including a couple of broken gold 9ct rings & many small items. Lead toys were very common, some intact & a good time indicator. The totals were for Day 1 328 coins, then 169, lastly 102. In the first batch were 60 silver mostly pre 1947. Three days gave 109 silver back to George III. Quite a few pre-vic coppers came out too. Silver coins in England changed fineness after 1919 from sterling to 50% up to 1947. Its a personal record on day 1, you can quickly work out the rate of coins dug per hour. What helped the speed was the Deus with very tight settings so responses were channeled into very positive only settings. On the second & third days I opened it up to catch other items, this I have found is the best method in these situations. Needless to say I've been back there with much less results, down to a couple of dozen yesterday. Not since the '89 Hurricane in this country have I done so well. Then, on a full day I retrieved over 600 old coins from one beach alone, but that was over seven or eight hours. Its rare even for me to come across these situations, very intense detecting that will be well remembered. There is now a massive haul of coins in the scrap copper, this will exceed last years enormous haul thanks to the d2 and manti. Photo 3 are silver coinage from small 3 pence (Like 3c silver) up to half crown (bigger than 50c piece).
    18 points
  45. One of the things that made me just have to have the Algoforce was the promise of Target ID's on it, I didn't think they'd be near as good as they in fact are. It's taken me by surprise and I think people will find it useful in many ways. The one thing so far that's standing out is shotgun pellets, every pellet I've tried and I noticed this in the gold field the other day the pellets ID at 00, and the gold I found both bit were in the numbers, not 00. So I've now tried a few more pellets, and a lot more gold and almost all of the gold gives a numbered ID and every pellet is giving me a 00, I think the sphere shape of the pellets is causing them to ID really low on 00. There is likely some pellets that will ID in the numbers and there is certainly some gold that ID's at 00, for example the smallest piece of my test bits was coming up as a 00, the one pictured below, it's smaller than the pellets. I thought I'd film a little demonstration video of this, along with showing some coin and junk target ID's on it to give people an idea of how it all works and the ID's it is showing. Again, my usual raw video style, fumbles, mumbles, mistakes and all. 🙂 Then I went out into my yard where I have a couple of NZ $1 or $2 coins buried, I think now using the Algoforce on them and its wonderful Target ID's they must be $2 coins, the Manticore is a bit wild on them and I could have messed around, tweaked it and done whatever else to try get it a bit better but the point of the demonstration isn't the Manticore, so I just did a ground balance, and noise cancel and had the sensitivity low enough the EMI wasn't causing too much havoc. The Nox 800 is more stable and detects these coins with a more accurate target ID of 21/22 on the easier one, and a bit bouncy on the deeper one but still a repeatable 21/22, the reason I'm now more confident they're $2 coins is the Algoforce seems to get a different ID for the two coins being different sizes, whereas on the Nox they both come in at 21/22 bouncing between the two, even in an air test. It's just been so many years since I put them in the ground I've forgotten, and the fact the Nox Id's them both the same I didn't overly care when burying them which of the two they were. So here is a little demonstration video of the Manticore and the Algoforce on these two buried coins. I had a fumble in the middle of the video leaving the Algoforce in pinpoint mode and for some reason my brain fart had me pressing re-tune to quiet the pinpoint mode down and tune out the target rather than exiting out of pinpoint mode and checking the target, I realize and fix it up but it wastes a few seconds of the video, either way, I wasn't going to bother filming it again or editing it to get rid of that so you'll have to deal with it 🙂 I hope this helps understand its target ID's better for those interested. A change they could make in a new firmware update I think is a separate volume control for the pinpoint mode, that'd be a nice thing to have so I will suggest that to them. (I contacted Algoforce about having an Independant pinpoint volume and it is coming in a new firmware update very soon)
    18 points
  46. Well l tried the Algoforce out this morning. First up the top locking lug on the carbon fibre shaft wouldn't tighten, It just kept spinning. I took the middle and bottom shafts out to see what was going on. The locking lug was just spinning on the shaft, gave it a pull and it came straight off. The glue was just a sticky mess. Looks like there wasn't enough hardner mixed with it. About to contact them and see what they think. Anyway back together and electrical tape around the joint and I was ready for testing. BTW bottom one seems fine, tightens up good. After setting up all the basics, threshold , tone, volume , ect I went into the coil menu and was pleasantly surprised to see the 8x6 Sadie was already there and ( ready to detect ) no need to calibrate. Emi tune and a ground balance and I was away. Bit of a test on a tiny bit of gold, keep burying it deeper and deeper till I could only just pick it up. Ultra fine was the best gold mode as you would expect. Next was the 9" round coiltek elite on the same target and same depth and it was hitting it better , could lift the coil about an inch higher. Ultra fine probably just had the edge over fine. There was no 9" coil in the menu so I had to edit the 12x8" to 9". Next up the 14x9" coiltek blitz. It was a bit of a surprise, picking up the target in Ultra fine and fine. The disappointing coil was the 12" round nuggetfinder evolution. Picked the target up but was a strange wobbly signal and was affected by emi a lot more than the other coils. It was the last coil tested so maybe the hotter ground ( it was 34 c when I left ) and more emi later in the day was the cause. I'll try it again first thing in the morning. The pick of the coils so far is the 9" coiltek elite. Lots more testing to do yet though. I'm impressed with the ground balance , bit slow sometimes especially when I changed gold modes but seems to hold the balance really well. I thought I'd be on the button rebalancing it all the time but it works great. Another thing I noticed was when changing coils, the spiral coils needed calibrating but the bundle ones didn't need it.
    18 points
  47. You are not wrong about weight, air tested only, stable with Sadie coil no trouble picking up the smallest micro gram scrap found with 6K recently, good clear signal on speaker. I am initially impressed, now to field test.
    18 points
  48. I hope this machine succeeds and the company goes on to bigger and better. It's price point does not challenge the leaders in the game, it is a much lower priced option. I'm old enough to remember when MInelab started out with VLF machines and then succeeded with their PI machines. Starting at a lower price is a smart move for a company given the dominance of the competition. Ground grab is a step up for some of us on a PI, coming from older White's Tdi machines. Quality of manufacture, operational stability, accuracy of the ground balance, performance in the field are other factors and the real important questions for me. For operators of the latest Minelab machines this machine is a step back, but at this price point some of us are still interested. For the money I do not expect a 'Holy Grail' detector, but I do like what I see and find myself interested in the potential. It is what it is, not a Minelab.. Size, weight, power and coil options all combine to make a light weight budget PI. I for one can live without ground tracking if a ground grab function is stable and accurate. Very early days and looking forward to user experience and videos. As an Australian I hope we have another successful metal detector manufacturer following in the footsteps of Minelab. Healthy competition, local jobs and it is just all good for electronic prospectors to have more budget friendly options. All the best.
    18 points
  49. Even better is this from their manual. Bug Report and Feature Request AlgoForce highly values customer feedback as a crucial means of enhancing our products. To ensure a seamless feedback process, we encourage you to reach out to us directly via email at admin@algoforce.com.au. If you come across any bugs or have ideas for new features that could enhance your metal detecting experience, please send us an email with a detailed description of the issue or requested feature. Kindly include the hardware serial number and firmware version of your detector (located in the Miscellaneous setting) in your email. Our dedicated team of developers will promptly review your feedback and respond to you accordingly. We appreciate your contribution and look forward to working together to improve our products. He used his time at Minelab to learn what not to do 😛
    18 points
  50. This is obviously out of date now but looks like the real deal for sure. https://www.zoominfo.com/p/Ruifeng-Huang/-1621431172 Ruifeng Huang is (was) a Senior Signal Processing Engineer at Minelab based in Mawson Lakes, South Australia. Previously, Ruifeng was a Research Scientist at National University of Singapore. Ruifeng received a Bachelor degree from North China Electric Power University and a Master of Engineering from North China Electric Power University.
    18 points
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