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  1. My part in all this is basically done now, because of the weather, if nothing else. I've put well over 200 hours on the Axiom in the last year, in Nevada, California, Alaska, and Australia. Garrett has implemented a lot of my suggestions, so working with them has been a pleasure in that regard. I think it is a better product for the effort. Gerry has me for total weight, but I've no doubt found more gold nuggets than anyone with the Axiom so far, with a couple ounces of mostly small stuff in my vial now. Now comes the sit back and see part for me, as I am truly as curious to see how the Axiom is received by the general public. In large part though, it is Africa that matters a lot more than the U.S. or even Australia. Results there will be far more opaque to most of us, but it is there that the real success of the Axiom will be gauged by Garrett. 2.25 ounces of gold I found with Axiom in last year. 20.33 grams Nevada and California in upper left, 13.15 grams Australia in upper right, and 36.61 grams Alaska along bottom. Largest nugget in upper left a gorgeous California 1/4 oz specimen. Smallest nuggets around 0.02 grams. Click or double click photos for full size versions. Gold found by Steve with Garrett Axiom Better picture of that 1/4 oz California nugget Edited just now by Steve Herschbach
    47 points
  2. I was down in Rye Patch 10/22-10/26 and am slow to post. First day I got there early afternoon and swung the 6k for a couple of hours. Pulled up a very tiny piece a couple of inches deep. Second day I hit the ground at first day light and pounded a spot where I have had luck in the past hard to no avail. Around 11 am a couple of other trucks came close to me and started detecting and I figured I would move on, as I was getting frustrated with my lack of success over the last 3.5 hours anyway. After meandering down some roads for a while, I ran into @NorCal . We had a nice conversation for a while and he was kind enough to give me some history of the area we were in and some past success he had there. Once we were done chatting and he packed up and left, I had the pleasure of detecting in a hail storm and wind. Skunked for the day, cold, wet and not in the best of spirits, I called it a day. Day 3, after sleeping in my truck with a 20 something degree night, I hit the ground running again. Once again hitting areas where I had success before, I was yet again skunked for the morning and frustrated with 30 mph gusts. I decided to go back to the random area I found the small piece at the first day, and warm up on the drive. First good choice I made all trip! I was able to pull 4 sub gram pieces out of the ground, all were 6-10 inches deep except one at 2”. Final full day, wind still howling. I fought my way through the day and pulled up 7 more pieces. I did hit the ground for about two hours the morning I left, but to no avail. All in all 12 pieces for a whopping weight of 1.6 grams! Pretty sure I spent more just heating my truck at night to stay warm, or more in beer, not to mention the 7.5 hour drive each way. But that wasn’t really the point. For me it was just getting out and swinging my machine, this is the first time in a year because of everything I have had going on in my life. I was ready to sell the damn thing after getting skunked for a day and a half, but it really is some tough hunting. Met @Arkyon my way out of the area and headed home happy and ready to get back out again soon!
    35 points
  3. Was fortunate to get into some gold on my last trip to California. Started the trip sniping on the NF of the Yuba, one day on Slate Creek and ended with several days detecting in the northern Mojave desert. Thanks for looking
    34 points
  4. Spent my last good detecting trip with friends for 4 days before driving out to Rye Patch proper and proceeded to give a gold detector class to 12 lucky folks. This will be my last trip down there for 2022 and I wanted to give an update and share some finds. 1st things was good to see Lundy parked at an old patch scuffing up with few nuggies. He sure talks highly of the 10" Ellip GOLD-HAWK coin on the end of his GPX-6000 and even showed me the proof. He's a pretty good hunter ol Lundy, so please don't expect to get same results as he. I think he had at least a half dozen nuggies sitting on it tailgate. Now is our turn. With the weather turning cold on us we had to bundle up pretty well, but it was the winds that was most annoying. Headphones were a must and you still needed a hat over those just to cut out the whistling from the headphone frames. Guess what I found out during this. Those earbud around the neck things Doc sells sure make a difference on hearing but not so much on keeping the ears warm. We woke up to 2 days of fresh snow early in the week and decided not to drive very far off the main roads. It was voted on and accepted that we stay in phone range and so we hunted for old coins/relics/do-dads. I enjoy these kinds of multi hunt trips and NNV is such a perfect area to do so as there are many towns, camps, stops along the highway and also a few small picker nugget patches not that far from there as well. 1st site produced 2 coins and a couple tokens. My brother banged the 1st one an 1909-S Barber dime and then backed that up with an 1884 IH cent. Pic of the dime. I had not even got on the board yet and little brother is making me feel old. Funny how things come full circle in life. At once I was the top dog detectorist of us two and it seems the last few yrs, he’s been outdoing me. Anyway. I sniffed out an interesting oblong piece of brass and can read “2 for 25 Cent on it. Not sure what it is as there is no name to associate. I did score two tokens and think one of them could be a collectors piece. The DEWY BAR of Salt Lake City UT, Good for 5 cent (below) The other one STEVENS & JOHNSON from National NEV from the Ice Palace SALOON for 12 ½ cents. (see below) I actually enjoy tokens more than coins as they have more history behind them. Then I stumbled across a really interesting coin, a US 2 Cent Copper dated 1876. That was my highlight coin for the trip, heck actually my best for the year. My brother managed a V nickel and an 1887 Seated Dime as well. One of the most unique digs was a ramrod guide from an 1800’s rifle. My big silver of the trip was a 1920 Walking Half Dollar just a scuff under the dirt. Not sure how this was missed by so many people as the site gets detected all the time. An interesting pic for you all to figure out what that cement looking thing is. Funny I have seen them before but never up close. Anyone know? Now lets get to the gold the stuff this forum is best at. One day of no rain/snow we drove out to Sawtooth and 3 of us hunted over half the day. 2 small dinks with the 6000 is all we were able to round up mostly because of trying to find a new patch. We know when looking for new gold areas, the chances of success go down drastically. But thats' also how you can stumble across a new site. After that, we boogied back to camp at Rye Patch proper. We had 30 minutes of light and so why not. I grab a detector and 4 targets later I have 3 dinks stuck under my lip. Man it’s funny how camp and the burn barrel just keep on giving. Problem is they just get smaller and smaller each year. Many people always say, "never leave gold to find gold". That's exactly how this day went. 2/3rd a day for 2 small pickers and 30 minutes at a known site for 3 dinks (pic below). The 3 on the coin came from Rye Patch proper. The class had a fantastic group of hard core wannabees. Even with the weather in the 30’s these troopers just kept on absorbing knowledge from staff and I. Gold started to get found on Saturday and by Sunday most students actually had great focus and nuggets were starting to pop. I think be the time it was all said and done, we ended up with a dozen pieces of gold and 5 or 6 smiling faces. It just amazes me how fast most folks can dial in their detectors/skills when around a few Field Experts for a few days. That’s exactly why we offer what we do. Below 3 pics is a customer from CA and his 1st Rye Patch, NV gold with his GPZ-7000 and small X coil. A customer from Idaho using an SDC-2300 found a picker and then after class scooped up 3 or 4 more. ( I guess the class did him well.) see his 2 pics below. Another CA guy with his GPX-6000 and the GOLDHAWK Coil. He was the gold hawg of the trip as I think his total ended up at half a dozen. Below 4 he found while I was there. Lunk was able to share his knowledge with the group before heading south to warm weather land. He grabbed an Axiom just to show it around and in the few minutes of swinging he does what Lunk does best. (below pic) I’m sure Lunk is down there in AZ right now charting his next desert hunt and ready to count his gold. One of the things we’ll offer our customers this winter is to get up with Lunk for a 1 day 1 on 1. In times past we have not really shared this as it’s time for Lunk to find gold or meteorites to help him get through the winter. Because we have a good number of folks who want to do training in AZ during the winter and they don’t click well in large groups, we decided to offer the 1 on 1 or 1 with a couple option. Lunk will be offering 2 types of training days. 1 for finding gold with your detector and the other for finding meteorites with your detector. Contact me for more details and we’ll go from there. That's it this year for Rye Patch, NV and possibly even here in Idaho as we still have snow on the ground from a week ago. I'll be updating my website Calendar of Events for 2023 after the 1st week of Jan. In the mean time, check out a few new videos on my website www.gerrysdetectors.com and then click on Videos. Time to start selling the Axiom and getting ready for a warm weather hunt. Keep in low and swing it slow...the detector you goof.😉 Gerry
    32 points
  5. Last night I went to one of my normal beaches. It was target rich after an afternoon of high tide, wind and waves. It has been several months since a day like yesterday and the beach was loaded with targets. When I got to my normal starting spot, I was a little disappointed with the slope of the beach. It didn't appear to be cut. I looked at the moon, the waves and took a couple of steps and BAM! I found myself at the bottom of a 4-5ft CUT! My hat came off with my light, sand got in my rubber boots, the detector went to one side and luckily the scoop and handle went to the other side. I didn't know what happened. As it turned out I was fooled by an 'infinity look' at the top before I tumbled. Of course I learned all of this after the fall rather than before. It looked like a steep slope but not a cut. When I put myself together, I started hunting this cut that was larger in some areas and less in others. This was one of my go to beaches that had very few targets the days before. It was the same beach I used the 5000 on a couple of days ago and then the 800/15 which I used last night. I wish I had my cell phone to take a picture of the cut. When you work a cut like this you wonder which direction to go. It would have been an easier choice if I had entered the beach in a safer manner. I started working it and noticed the sand was a bit fluffy against the walls. This helped in my fall but didn't hold the targets I was expecting. I didn't see anyone else out so I hurried to work the cut first which means you walk it and go one swing away from the wall. You don't walk down the slope to the waves ... yet. The wall I worked was close to a mile. It held the stainless-steel chain and cross and a couple of the 8 rings. I switched back and worked the wall back below my first swing. I was finding 'patches' of quarters and dimes but I still wanted to 'cherry pick' the wall listening for good tones. When I was done with that I walked back again going lower and getting the 15g silver ring and some of the heavy weights. Unfortunately, there were no heavy gold rings in these patches. I did manage the one gold wire ring. This is the tally. 76 Quarters (personal best) 66 Dimes 24 Nickels 55 Pennies 48 Pieces of junk 19 Pieces of jewelry This is 291 recoveries in my 5 lb bag at the end of the night. So let's say 300 including a few pieces I didn't keep. I dug at many targets that were just black sand at times without a recovery. Quite a few targets could be recovered shallow with a couple of scoops but many required a lot more effort. So let's say an average would be a bit above 3 scoops per target. That is where I get my 1000 scoops! Who knows where I'll go tonight. I hope it is some place with more gold. Here are the coins. Here is the jewelry. (Added 11/4 The silver chain is 21g) Here is the trash. Here is the 5 lbs of stuff. This was from Sunday Night. This was from Saturday Night with my 5000/Coiltek.
    31 points
  6. Metal detectorist discovers medieval wedding ring worth an estimated $47,000 "Every metal detectorist dreams of unearthing something valuable. For one man the English countryside yielded an incredible find when he stumbled upon a medieval diamond wedding ring in "almost perfect condition" near Thorncombe, in the South West of the country. Now the item is expected to fetch between £30,000 and £40,000 ($35,500 and $47,300) when it goes on auction later this month." Story Here Auction Site Inscription in Medieval French reading: ‘ieo vos * tien * foi * tenes * le moy’ translating ‘As I hold your faith, hold mine’ Photo credit: Noonans
    30 points
  7. I've been sick as a dog almost six weeks, and it finally cleared up last week after a heavy regiment of antibiotics. I haven't been detecting for a couple of months so Tom and I decided to detect one of his back pocket Spanish era western sites. The site is getting pretty stingy, but there's still targets here and there. Right out of the gate I dug an interesting object that looked like a coin, but I didn't recognize it. Tom thought it was probably a kids play coin. I threw it in my finds pouch to investigate when I got home. When I got home, I looked at it more closely in good light and I could see it was dripping with age, but had no idea what I'd found. I took some closeup photos so I could better see the writing on it, and after some online research discovered that low and be hold I'd dug a hammered token from 1719!! Here's what I found out about it: NUREMBERG TOKEN FOR AUGUSTE III of SAXE / MARY-JOSEPH OF AUSTRIA 1719 Diameter: 22mm. Weight: 0.78g. Origin: Hérault. Obverse: AUG III D(eo)G(ratia) POL .REX Reverse: MARIA IOSEPHA - bottom STADTT (= City of Nuremberg). Comment: It is a token minted in Nuremberg in 1719 on the occasion of the marriage of the King of Poland AUGUSTE III of SAXONY, Polish King of German origin, with Marie-Josèphe of Austria, who thus became Queen of Poland herself. Not a lot of other finds, but also ended up with a pewter spoon bowl, a Spanish period ball button (unfortunately NOT a Phoenix ball button 😞), a piece of heavy green copper that was fashioned into a kettle/spear point (very cool IMHO), and what appears to be a gold decorative piece of something fancy, not sure what but after looking it over it appears to be period. Overall a decent hunt, although not brimming with tons of finds, it just takes once good one to turn the tide. Tom found something cool too, but I'll let him share his good fortune 😁
    30 points
  8. The last day of my recent trip to Australia I was hunting a spot several people had just found some little gold nuggets on. We were all using the new Garrett Axiom PI detector. I wanted to what, if anything, they had left behind. I got a couple small high/low tones, that can mean small gold, but turned out to be shotgun pellets. Still, they should not have missed those. Then I got a soft low/high tone. This can mean a larger gold nugget, but usually means a trash target. But the spot had produced gold, so I went ahead and dug it, just in case. Imagine my surprise when out popped what was obviously a coin, with a hint of silver showing. I had found my only coin of the trip, a silver 1914 Australian sixpence. I had a dozen nuggets also, but the coin is for me the better find, as nuggets are something I find a lot of. Silver not so much, and Aussie silver - my first!
    29 points
  9. A recent nocturnal atmospheric event caused ethereal aqueous particles to change there physical state and loose the ability to remain in suspension thus, by the force of gravity, declined in altitude until reaching an impermeable layer and forming a cryogenically unpleasant layer over the local auriferous matrix, which complicates the use of digitally controlled induction of an electro-magnetic field used to obtain relatively pure elemental mineral particles thereby causing me to retreat to my laboratory where I will be evaluating the thermal convective distribution of controlled carbonization of organic cellular compounds. Or----- It snowed last night and I can't go detecting so I'm sitting by the wood stove.
    28 points
  10. Well, I think I have that little area cleaned out now. I thought I would put all the pictures in one thread. So far its been a great start to the season. Many more miles to hunt. I hope I can keep it going, but I know all to well what happens when one area drys up. Just hope to keep that skunk away for awhile longer. If I did my math right it is a total of 15.35 grams! The biggest being 10.01 grams and the smallest, well I am not sure it even weighed anything.
    27 points
  11. Hey guys. Been waiting to get out for a while. Some health issues but finally out! Did a drive to a place I love from years ago. Awesome day weather wise. Loved it. I down graded due to my health but any day swinging a detector to me is bliss, especially where I went. See nobody, hear nobody and all alone. In my element. Used the Garrett 24k with the 6" and it cruised on half Sat, 7 sens Audio Boost 2. Dug heaps of targets, several surprised me up to about 8" deep for their size. Damn lead. 😆 Ended up with 2 Specimens, 1 id guess from experience has close to 1/2 a g, the other lucky to be .1 and a tiny .1 bit free gold. No record breaking but was a great day. Was really surprised though how the 6" handled the area. Expected to be running it around 5 to below. Tried above 7 and other settings but just a little too chattery and picking up too many real little hot rock chips. Its amazing with this just what 1 step down sens does. 80% vanished and it ran so much better than on 8! Anyway, didn't get rich 😆 but was a ton of fun. Drive in. Big drop off to the right. Nearly there. Arrived and the spot. Good fun and happy I can still swing something. 👍
    25 points
  12. This forum has been running for ten years now. I have never done anything to weed the database down in all those years, and it is getting way too full of stuff that does not need to be there. A big one is people who have registered over the years, but never posted. The so-called Lurkers. That's fine I guess but the reality is there is almost no reason to join the forum if you are not going to post. The content is free for anyone to view without an account, so you are free to lurk all you want, without taking up database space. The only area that is off limits to non-members is in the Downloads area, where I have limited the ability to download the large files to members only. I'm just trying to keep a lid on the bandwidth by keeping outside sites from linking directly to the resources there. Long story short a quick review shows that fully half the members database is comprised of non-posting accounts, going back ten years. I am going to delete all those accounts before the end of the year, except any created in the last 90 days. If you have one of those accounts, and do not want it deleted, you need to make at least one post before the end of the year. This thread will work. Just post anything at all here, and your account will not get deleted. You only need to do this if you have never posted on this website before. If any accounts are being held by spammers, it’s likely to be in this group, so it helps clean that up also. The end result will be invisible to current users, except that the site may get a tiny bit faster once I clear out all the deadwood. These people have never posted, so no actual content gets lost.
    25 points
  13. I have been cleared by my surgeon to metal detect but only on flat/level ground and I have to wear my CAM boot. Luckily I have two of these ankle boots so getting goose pooh, mud and snow all over my older beat up one is no problem. I have been out three times in the last week for about 1.5 hours each time. Great way to walk my dog and I get to dig 40 or 50 targets. Getting down on the ground to retrieve deeper targets and back up is a pain but hey, at least I'm walking and metal detecting. Deus 2 has been the detector I chose for the three hunts because I wanted to see if that ugly makeshift stand I concocted would actually hold up......so far it works great and no cartwheeling Deus 2 lately. Lots of people on this forum have been asking questions about hunting gold jewelry with Deus 2. I basically am always hunting for gold jewelry or any jewelry when I go out to one of the many local parks or school grounds in my area. Today I hunted a local park where there are organized sports activities like smaller child mini soccer games, adult volleyball (on grass), ultimate frisbee and also a rugby league. At a place like this it is always a question for me whether I should hunt the actual playing field or the sidelines where participants keep there belongings and where any spectator might sit to watch. Usually I try to find the sidelines by following the trail of trash. That is what I did today and I was rewarded. I had Deus 2 in FMF Fast with discrimination set at 40 and 5 tones for iron, small gold 40 to 58, US nickels and medium gold 59 to 65, larger gold and zinc pennies 66 to 87 and US clad and silver 88 to 99. So I did not have anything notched out and I made myself dig any good sounding target between 40 and 98 that wasn't too deep (down to about 6") with an emphasis on the 40 to 87 range where gold rings can definitely happen. I dug about 40 targets in a little more than an hour. Half were pull tabs/aluminum trash. The other half were US clad, a 1944 silver Mercury dime, a stainless steel/CZ honker ring target ID 50, a 3.5 gram .925 silver ring target ID 96 and a 8 gram 14K gold ring with diamonds and ebony target ID 72. All three rings were in a straight line, just on the edge of the playing field about 10 feet apart. So I got all three on one pass parallel to the playing field. Man did that feel good. I will eventually hit the playing fields too for sure. I did not by any means dig every target I heard. Only the really good sounding ones that were not at the edge of detection according to tone quality and the WS6 depth meter. Dig that good sounding aluminum trash.......it is the only way to not miss quality jewelry and bling that is mixed in with it.
    25 points
  14. Having only one detector now I have been forced to learn how to use it for hunting gold. I have had the Nox 800 for about 2 years, and have not really used it that much. A little on coins in the summer months when I am back in Michigan, but never while in Arizona hunting gold. It has been a real learning experience with many many hours in the field the last 3 weeks with little to show for it. I am hunting one of the most pounded area in western Arizona and maybe the US. I have read and re-read many articles on gold hunting with the Nox but by far what has help me the most was a series of 3 articles produced by Steve Herschbach back in 2014 “Finding gold with a VLF” published in ICMJ magazine. It is very good reading for those who have not read it. After apply Steves principles things started to come around for me. I have hated being without my Monster and my GPX6000 but maybe it was for the better. I surely am becoming more capable with any detector I pick up now but I am still learning everyday out in the field. That will probably never end. Some days are still great even though my best detectors are in for repairs. I don’t have any fancy pictures but here is a couple of my finds with the Nox.
    25 points
  15. Well, I just got my Nokta Legend with extra 6in. coil 3 days ago. Today I hit a small park and started around an outdoor basketball court with the aim to find some jewelry. Day 3 detecting with the new machine turned out to be the charm! So far I have about 15 hours coin-shooting and looking for jewelry in parks and sports fields with the Legend, and I have to say it handles my highly-mineralized soil quite well with its SMF capabilities. Thankfully with my experience running 2 other SMF detectors the past few years, watching videos and reading the manual last week, I think I've gotten a solid handle of how to set up this machine. It might take a newcomer much longer to get to where I am, but the Legend is easy to use and even in the default modes and settings would work great for a less-experienced detectorist. Ring #1 was about 6ft. in the grass behind one of the basketball hoops. I thought a VDI# of 51 would mean it was a quarter, but imagine my surprise when this heavy, initialed with a "K" pinky ring turned up. I kid you not, it weighs exactly 1/2 oz. of sterling silver at 15.55 grams on the scale! Five minutes later, I knew I had another silver ring when I saw 6ft. over a VDI# of 55. I'd never seen an ID# that high in my previous outings, but being so close to a honker ring, it had to be another...and it was. A nicely styled, large man's ring. Its not a whopper like the other, but a respectable 7.23 grams. I attribute these two finds to 3 things, location, location, and the 6in. coil on the Legend that gave me the courage to dive into this zone heavy with trash, lol. In my short time out with the Legend, I'm really enjoying it a lot. Its a ton of fun to swing with the "dinky" coil, has great sensitivity to low conductors and works great in a variety of situations like in parks, fields, tot lots. Other detectors I've owned have struggled in my hot dirt, but the Legend handles it decently for the time being. Someday I still hope for technology that tames my dirt, but this newer crop of detectors with SMF are opening things up some. You still have to swing over the treasure though, and I'm glad I was able to get over these two beauties.
    24 points
  16. Almost forgot 2 other interesting items and one of them was on the surface. A pink glass dish with a critter (see pic). and a tobacco toy metal bull. Sure love the do-dads.
    24 points
  17. TomCA and I decided to test out our new fat tire ebikes integrated into some detecting earlier this week. The bikes are awesome, I can see these really being useful in the future for some of our adventures where you simply cannot drive, and may have several miles of ground to traverse before getting to your detecting objectives. So we have a Fur Trading site and a Gold Rush era encampment that aren't too far apart from each other that we were able to get to. No doubt that TomCA made the find of the day, but I was (fairly) happy with my take as well. The Gold Rush era encampment we call the Buckle Village because we're found several Gold Rush era tongue and wreath style buckles that were prevalent to the Gold Rush 49'ers flooding into the west coast to make their fame and fortune. They simply don't seem to be found at sites from different eras (I'm sure there's exceptions as always). This encampment has produced several for us, as well as a beautifully decorated powder flask, buttons, TomCA got a nice reale, I got what's considered the first trade token minted in California from 1850, a stunning 1820 United States Militia one piece button, and plenty of other period relics. At this site, Tom bested me with his prize and I'll let him have the honors of sharing that when he shares his finds. My best find from this site was an 1840s and 1850s early United States Marines two piece button backmarked "SCOVILLS & CO / [dot] WATERBURY [dot]". A few buckles, and what appears to be a knife or dagger hilt. This site has really dried up since our first few visits, but there's still finds there if you work your a$$ off 🤠 The next site has been a fun one, early California fur trading post site that digs deep into early California history. At this site you just never know what you'll find. It was my day for green copper, I dug a butt load of it, possibly more then I've ever dug there before. The larger pieces sound so good, beautiful high tones with high 20's to low 30's TID's on the EQX800, so you dig each and everyone anticipating a reale or bust coin, only to be let down with a green copper whatsit. Still fun history BUT it's getting stingy with non green copper items. This trip I managed to get a small, thin copper coin of some sort. I'm sure it's not a button or whatnot, but it's so corroded it's unlikely to ever be ID'd. I also dug a period bronze wedding ring, which while not as showy as a gold or silver ring, is still fun to me as it was likely a very personal effect that someone wore from the old world to the new world in their great adventure only to leave it behind to be found centuries later. Also got the obligatory black powder round ball drops and a few fired ones (I actually like finding those) and some later period rim-fire shells. Dug a bunch of bronze nails/spikes. I don't mind digging these, their not like square nails that litter most of our relic sites out west, these are hand forged bronze nails/spikes with old world forged rose heads. Also a couple of interesting bits they made for some special purpose use. I'm sure Tom will proudly display his buffalo and war nickles 🤣 so I'll show my wheat cents and fluke clad too 😁
    22 points
  18. I'm currently doing comparison testing between the production model Axiom and the GPX 6000; it's not scientific by any means, just observations for my own information, but I will report my methods and observations on the Metal Detector Advice and Comparisons forum when I'm finished. And there will be gold pics. 🙂
    22 points
  19. Happy Turkey day everyone! Yes, I'm a prospecting scoundrel being out here at this very moment nugget shooting on this family-oriented holiday. But, I got the go ahead from the wife and kids to do a late dinner tonight. I've done a few quick tests of my new Axiom in a familiar patch area that's like an old friend on life support. Sad to see a patch dry up, but I know there is still gold on the fringes. I tried out the 13x11DD on the hottest patch of dirt I know of and it drives all of my PIs nuts, especially when wet like right now. I got the machine calmed in Normal mode/timing and sensitivity at 2-3. Nice to have adjustability like that. Next I headed up the ridge to "milder" dirt, its "only" highly-mineralized instead of red hot, haha. We've cleaned it pretty well, just a few pieces of small rust and an almond-sized hot rock with the 11x7 mono equipped now. I did snag the smaller nugget on a steep, very rocky spot 2-3in. down. It was likely missed by larger coils that didn't fit. I just pulled this second nugget at a spot where an old timer's ditch hits the creek. It's loaded with nails and is a spot we've "saved" until last. Down 3in. on bedrock, I was sure it would be a nail. It was not, and something to be thankful on this day! My tough ground is challenging the Axiom pretty hard. I'm in Fine mode, but on sensitivity 2. Higher sensitivity levels are too much, as Steve warns in his sensitivity control guidelines thread. HEED his warnings! The only hitch has been the wireless headphones. They frequently "pop" and wireless is lost for an instant. Seems to happen when my head nears the coil to dig or run the scoop over it. I've had a few times its totally disconnected. Standing up reconnects it. Multiple repairing and even a factory reset haven't solved it. I'm running the speaker now and I'm glad this unit has one. It's plenty loud and clear.
    22 points
  20. Let me start off by saying, I normally do not mention other brands and or models of detectors when I'm giving kudos to those who have earned it. But at the same time, I also realized I've been giving the same kudos for years to those other brands and detector models my staff/I prefer and or use. So I'll stuff the rock in my mouth now and get it out of the way. 1 year this month is how long it's been and boy what a blast and fun my team/I has had. Funny, how they are just now (a yr later) getting into customers hands. Better to wait a little and get it right than piss off the world.. 1st off a big thanks to Garrett Electronics and their distribution center for getting the Axiom out to my customers in time as some of them are already in their hands and I’ve been told of some Thanksgiving detecting going on. As many of you follow on DP, my staff/I were selected to work behind the scene and help make this detector even better. Being a US Military Veteran, I was also very adamant about Garrett offering a 15% military discount, which they have never offered in all the yrs I've been selling their products. On a side note, I was one of the most vocal dealers to talk Minelab into the same thing yrs back. I heard a few dealers are not offering it (it is voluntary) but here at Gerry's Detectors, I most certainly will do so. One of the things about the new man in charge at Garrett, he is a thinker, but most importantly, he listens. No, I didn't get everything my way, but I feel what changes have been made are all better for, end users of the Axiom, dealers who sell it and even Garrett themselves. Back/forth open discussion is critical for new releases, the longevity of our hobby and the manufactures who build them. Hopefully other manufactures do the same. My Field Staff and I have spent hundreds of hrs on the new PI technology using/testing/comparing and making judgment of this new detector while finding gold in 3 different states. We even shared it for a bit at the last Rye Patch NV Field Training class and watched Lunk pull a small nugget some of the other big machines missed. No, it doesn't have the same raw depth/power of $8500 detectors but at the cost of only $4000 ($3400 with VET discount), you sure are getting 85% to 95% of it, depending on soil conditions and kind of gold. Why do I say kind of gold? Because some types of Au rocks and nuggets, the Axiom has greater depth/sensitivity. I've been swinging a variety of detectors for 45+ yrs with the last 25+ in the pursuit of the heavy metal. I'll admit the majority of top performing detectors for my Au tasks were not from the Garrett brand. In my opinion, they and the other manufactures just could not put a complete machine design to my liking for the styles of my hunts. I've owned Infinium, AT Gold and even the ATX. They are nice machines with a couple good features and their price points are what you would expect. But the bottom line, I would always going back to the well-known brand for most situations….until now. Thank you Garrett Electronics (and all the people involved with the making of this fine detector) for providing a PI detector option at a reasonable price that actually performs extremely well for a variety of conditions and on many different styles and kinds of gold. My Field Staff and I (each one of us) are more than pleased and actually quite blown away that you could come out of nowhere and produce a detector of such caliber. My guys and I are used to running the best of the best and we’re willing to pay whatever the price to do such. So when I told them about said machine and they selecting my team to test it, they (my guys) just played along and said sure. It was as if them telling me. We’ve been down this road before Gerry and we’re pretty sure of the results. Well to be honest, I couldn’t blame them for be so…so.. ok we’ll do it…but as soon as it’s over, we’re back to what gets us the gold and the machines we prefer. Not so fast my friends…. Things didn’t play out the way we expected. My guys are totally on board and eager and wanting to get back out there with this Axiom. They’ve pounded the ground, sweated the heats, broken the frost and still happily swinging the Axioms. Why you say. Cause the results are golden and they pokes have been overflowing this year. Folks, I say this as FACT and no bullshit here. This last year 3 of us found more gold than we did the previous year. We attribute the success to the Axiom and the way it runs, the features it has and the overall performance for the areas we detected. Garrett has made a detector that will provide so many people the ability to enjoy it’s benefits of a PI. PI’s of past are just that, the past. Prime example, why so many people in the US go from a GPZ-7000 to a GPX-6000, when the 7000 is still the deepest big gold detector out there? I’m guessing here, but a big % of my customers was the weight and ergonomics. Those who waited to see and hear the results soon found out so much of the big gold had already played out in the US. But still the GPX-6000 was finding small gold and specimens better than the 7. So for many, the switch was a no brainer. Now we get another option from another player and this one has features the other 2 mentioned do not. This one has better coil selection the other 2 do not. This one is priced much better and more affordable for more people. This one, the Axiom.. is a great detector to be thankful for. I'm not saying it beats the others in every way, never have, never will. But the overall capabilities and fun factor...let it shine let it shine. Again Garrett, your complete family and also Steve H. (yes you had more to do than many realize), I thank you all for giving us the gold detecting, beach hunting, and CW Relic era detectorists an amazing option to use in the field and have fun doing what we enjoy. You really built a detector that has impressed me and most of all my Field Staff, way way way more than what we initially expected. Cools digs.. We are lucky to live in a country that allows us to enjoy a variety of hobbies, allows us to speak our mind and allows us to have a little fun and laughter. If you are not smiling, choking on a chunk of Au or getting a laugh with friends while out enjoying the Hunt, then I ask you to please grab your detector and go make some memories. Finding the gold is just part of the fun. Thank You All and Happy Thanksgiving. (some new pics many of you have not seen). Gerry at Gerry's Detectors in Boise, Idaho.
    22 points
  21. I told the wife I was going on a quick hunt this morning and would be back by noon. Made it back by 11:30 instead lol. The goal was to combine a relic hunt at an old WW2 base near me and hit a park on the way home for jewerly...The WW2 base is nothing more than urban development with dirt that has been turned over but you can still find some cool stuff if you know where to look. Used the Deus 2 for about 1.5 hours then switched gears and hit a park on the way home. Targets were tough all around with most being beyond the reach of the garret carrot. Was very pleased to see the shiny gold ring pop out of the hole at the park. It was a solid 18 with the Nox in park 1 and weighs right at 6 grams 14K... I dug many zinc pennies today that read from 20 to 12 in various stages of decay. The tiny chain is silver and was a 1 on the Nox...the bigger chain plus crusifix is stainless. Dont forget to dig those zinc pennies fellas you never know what will turn up. HH and Thanksgiving. strick
    22 points
  22. One last hunt on this spot before it changes hands and I no longer have access. Its an old home site near an old townsite...people have been hunting the townsites for decades but they seemed to miss this old home site.... or not. I've been here twice before and not found any coins but there seemed to be lots of higher conductors. So I gave it one more shot today. I needed a break as I worked all day yesterday getting our garden beds ready to plant the winter garden. I'm calling it a successful hunt due to the Silver thimble and the butt end of the rifle. Those were my only good finds despite digging lots of targets and I got my exercise by walking a few miles as well. I'm thinking the rifle butt end is from a Musket? We have found a couple powder flasks at this site. strick
    22 points
  23. The last day of my recent trip to Australia I was hunting a spot several people had just found some little gold nuggets on. We were all using the new Garrett Axiom PI detector. I wanted to what, if anything, they had left behind. I got a couple small high/low tones, that can mean small gold, but turned out to be shotgun pellets. Still, they should not have missed those. Then I got a soft low/high tone. This can mean a larger gold nugget, but usually means a trash target. But the spot had produced gold, so I went ahead and dug it, just in case. Imagine my surprise when out popped what was obviously a coin, with a hint of silver showing. I had found my only coin of the trip, a silver 1914 Australian sixpence. I had a dozen nuggets also, but the coin is for me the better find, as nuggets are something I find a lot of. Silver not so much, and Aussie silver - my first!
    22 points
  24. This find was on one of my favorite beaches. The conditions weren't optimal but sometimes you just have to learn about your beach to be ready for the good times and the good tides. This is silver and weighs 13.4g. We'll see what an image search comes up with.
    21 points
  25. Last summer I shot a video with the Garrett crew, with a concise set of tips for helping new Axiom owners get started, and a focus on nugget hunting. In that video it was very short and easy. Turn detector on, and while using default settings, set sensitivity to max, and a few quick pumps to manually ground balance. EMI cancel as an added option if needed. There video is below, and still very much worth watching. But things have changed dramatically with the settings, so I now have a new set of recommendations. Simply put, the Axiom went on steroids after my feedback from my Australia trip. Overall gain and sensitivity were boosted dramatically, and the ground balance system further improved. Before, you could pretty much run the detector at full out sensitivity anytime, anyplace. Now, you most definitely cannot do that! I hope my old video does not end up hurting some new buyer experiences, and hopefully an updated version will be released. Regardless, you will be getting far more detailed information in this post. The sensitivity control has eight settings, and used to have a default of 6. Before, you could just go to 8 and call it good. Now, the new default setting is 4, which is in reality even higher than the prototype setting of 6. There has been a very large jump in gain, with the highest settings pushing the hardware to the limits. The sensitivity control is basically a post processing audio boost. It increases not only target signals, but all audio signals. The system is designed to try and treat target audio preferentially, but the fact remains that increasing the sensitivity control adds more “noise” in the form of ground feedback, hot rocks, and EMI. The number one goal of new owners while learning the Axiom should be smooth, quiet operation. I promise you that you will not get that if you run the sensitivity too high! My basic recommendation is new owners is to stay at 4 until you learn the detector. Do not do what the video says and go to max!! Experienced PI operators will probably be happier at 5 or 6. That’s subjective, and the pros will stay put, or go lower, or higher. But in general I found 6 worked well for me, but remember, I like running on the hot and noisy side. Settings 7 and 8 should be in bright red, like the red zone on your cars RPM gauge. You should only go there if you know exactly what you are doing. These settings are not intended for general operation, but for user indicated specific situations. They will make the machine noisier, and so the operators ability to use ALL the other settings, and the proper coil, will determine how useful these redline settings are. For new operators, new owners, everything depends on EMI and ground conditions, but look for a quiet, stable setting. It is a fact that target signals usually drop off slower than the “noise” signals, and by eliminating the noise, you will make targets more distinct, and easier to hear. A test target can be extremely helpful in adjusting the control. Make the target as distinct as possible to your own ear. Turning the sensitivity up will make the target sound off louder, but go too high, and you will get lots of other signals. Trained ears can separate these signals from target signals, which tend to have a distinct sound all their own. But to new users, it’s all just noise, and everything might sound just like a target. False signals, that tire the operator with mental processing, and possibly holes dug where nothing exists. Time wasted. Many operators will find they prefer the setting to be at moderate levels, with the detector basically silent, unless a genuine target sounds off. Some pros will prefer this also. There is no right or wrong in all this, no magic canned settings. Different people use different methods, often with similar results. The new default setting of 4 is what would be considered a “safe” setting. It may very well suit some pros quite well, Some experts prefer quiet operation, and so may find 4 or no more than 5 to be their preferred settings. Some may tolerate noise very well, and choose 6 instead. In general 6 worked very well for me. People who know me, know I like pushing the sensitivity very high. Axiom is a detector I like, because it makes me find my limits, and even I am finding out the need to finesse the setting more than I can with other machines. So back to sensitivity settings 7 and 8, the Redline Settings. What I mention below is very important if you attempt to use them. Do not expect automatically that you just can and all will be well. Going right to these settings may do nothing but make you unhappy. You need to understand the machine and how all the settings and coils interplay to get the most out of the top end. However, even the default setting of 4 will benefit from these tips. For instance, if you are in an area free of EMI, higher sensitivity is more available. Less variable ground is more amenable to high sensitivity. DD coils can tolerate higher sensitivity. Small coils tolerate high sensitivity more than large coils. The other settings now matter a lot more. Before, the machine ran well with all the others settings at default. Now, they will come into play far more often, and you need to know what you are doing with them. The Speed Control is absolutely critical for operation at the highest sensitivity level. The default Medium Speed is fine for general operation, but if you are pushing the sensitivity up, Slow will run quieter, and you will absolutely benefit as an operator by also slowing down yourself. VLF users go too fast, period, for general PI operation. If you are patch hunting or just desire to cover ground, run the defaults. But if you are really wanting max performance on a hunted patch, nothing will benefit you more than just going slower! Coil to the ground, low and slow, can’t say it enough. The Slow Speed mode is made for this type of hunting, and it really helps with higher sensitivity levels to use the Slow setting, and move at a crawl. The Timing setting is another great example. There are four timings, Fine (Default), Normal, Large, and Salt. In general, each successive one is introducing longer pulse delays, which tends to lower overall sensitivity to ground, hot rocks, and smaller targets. The Salt setting eliminates salt signals, but eliminates small gold signals also. See this link for details. Before, I could run Fine Mode at full sensitivity of 8 almost anywhere. Now, Normal becomes a more viable alternative setting, as it tolerates a higher sensitivity setting. Each successive mode can lower overall sensitivity, but can now be offset more by running a higher sensitivity control setting. It’s very much like a salt and pepper thing, and has to be adjusted to taste. The key thing to do here is not forget about the alternative modes. Again, a test target, like a small nugget or small piece of lead, can really help here. Don’t just stick with Fine Mode. You might discover that Normal, with the sensitivity one notch higher then what you were using with Fine, works better in your particular location, especially if larger gold is the main goal. Dry beach hunters and relic hunters in particular may benefit from Normal or Large, but with higher sensitivity levels than would be used with Fine. In general, both EMI canceling and proper ground balance are more important at high sensitivity levels, and both may need to be done more often, depending where you are. Hot rocks get boosted at high sensitivity, and the Garrett hot rock window mode will be more important than ever, for dealing with those oddball rocks. To repeat, coils matter more at the highest settings, with DD coils in general tolerating higher sensitivity. The background threshold tone will increase at high sensitivity levels. Here is a weird trick people can experiment with. Run sensitivity 7 or 8, but run threshold at -8 or -9. This suppresses the threshold entirely, but with the sensitivity control maxed you might get some breakthrough chirps. So sensitivity 7 or 8, threshold -8 or -9. Any combination of those might be the magic. It makes the Axion dead quiet, but get over a target, and BANG! you will know something is there. Could be the ultimate setting for a rank newbie, making the Axiom act almost more like a silent search VLF. But you pros may discover it has uses also so do give it a try. I’ll end with my favorite example of my using the highest sensitivity setting of 8. Shallow ground, tiny gold. 11” DD coil, Fine Mode, Sensitivity 8, Slow Speed, and move at a crawl investigating the tiniest of sounds. It might be too noisy for you, if so, lower that sensitivity. And to wrap up, that’s the answer in general. If you think the Axiom is too noisy, if you are getting too much in the way of false signals, EMI, erratic operation, you name it - LOWER THE SENSITIVITY SETTING! I’m serious, if you don’t want to get a “what are you, stupid” type response don’t complain the Axiom is noisy. It’s only noisy if you make it noisy, and I promise you can. That’s by design, that’s how you find the edge. Nothing is more irritating than people who complain about problems they are creating for themselves. Lower the sensitivity! Look at it like this. The Axiom is your car. The sensitivity setting is your gas pedal. Would you want a car that you could drive with the pedal to the floor all the time? Set to be safe on corners and rough roads. Can’t go faster than 35mph no matter what? That’s the way a lot of detectors get designed. Or do you want the car to be able to go to 120mph, even though that’s not safe, or even legal? Do you want passing power? Do you want to be able to open it up on the freeway and maybe speed a little? The Axiom sensitivity control is like the gas pedal on a sports car. Press it down too far when you should not, you will crash and burn. The top end is there for the rare circumstances where they make sense, or for those operators who can run at higher, noisier levels, and do the mental processing required to pick target signals out of the noise. So one last time, and repeat after me, when in doubt, if something is wrong - lower the sensitivity!! I do hope this helps some people get started out right. The Axiom is a wonderful detector with the right driver behind the wheel. Take your time to learn it properly before you go racing. If you do so you will learn to appreciate it like I have. Thank you Garrett for making this happen, and for letting me take my swings at you, and taking them with good cheer. The final result is better because of the effort. The original tips video, with now obsolete settings tip for the sensitivity control. Garrett Axiom Quick Facts, Owner's Manual, Etc.
    21 points
  26. I’ve been more than blessed other than with Nuggets! The Friends, Adventure and lifetime of memories are my best finds. I was a pretty successful dredger in the Motherlode, but that gave way to full time metal detecting to satisfy my Gold Fever. I can’t remember every poke I’ve parted with, but if I remember right this one was over 5 ounces. It’s a mixture of California Foothills nuggets and the bottom one was just a hair shy of 1-ounce from the Sawtooth Knob area of Nevada. You bet I wonder, where all the big nuggets are at…until the next virgin patch of fatties, keep swinging that coil. LuckyLundy
    21 points
  27. Despite the frozen ground, my brother Jim and I got out for a few hours on some new ground and got some sub-grammers. Being housebound, forces us to take a chance sometimes. Anyway, we got some with the Gold Bug 2 & GPX 6000, along with a bunch of square nails, shotgun pellets, bullets and bits of steel. We quit digging on quite a few signals, due to hard frozen ground, though. We'll check them next spring.
    20 points
  28. Great picture, something about that color!! Here are a few of my bigger pieces I could to this day after many many years tell you the exact spot I found them, but I won't 🙂 the big ones are out there..don't let anyone tell you there not.
    20 points
  29. 20 points
  30. Cold Sunday. Got out early, it was 37 and windy. 😵 I had to dress warm, if my hands and feet get cold I'm done. Reynaud's Syndrome is a detectorist's nightmare. Went back to the farm I've found so much good stuff at this week, I usually don't hunt on the weekends but had a social cancellation and nothing to do. This area is fairly sheltered in some places, so I figured I could warm up there. Luckily there were no hunters. Turned out to be pretty good, my hands and feet didn't get too cold because it was sunny and I was moving around and digging. I don't think it ever got above 41, but I was ok. I wore electric heated socks and brought heated gloves, from experience the Equinox can't handle the EMI from the gloves' pulse heat. I hoped the Deus 2 would be better. It was. 🥳 The socks didn't bother it at all, and I was able to tune out the gloves with one press of the frequency button. Ended up not needing either but it was nice to know! I don't think winter is going to be too warm. I was out there for 7 hours today, scouted around a lot. Wasn't finding much, but at random I got all this: Another half spectacle buckle, some small button bits including a lead one and a broken Tombac, and some farm/animal brass. Even got .27 in modern coins. 😀 That big D buckle was a 95. 🤬 Not that I minded getting a big buckle but the silver alternative would have been a bonus. 🤔 The big half circle is some sort of old snap ring, and the curve with prongs I've never seen before. Extreme right is a fancy buckle fragment. I was detecting across the field to a different spot, and on the way got a solid 73, I thought "cool, another fancy button". Nope. Size 5.5 or 6 14K wedding band, a little over 6mm wide or 1/4 inch. It weighs 4.1g. I'm trying to find the maker's mark, could be a sideways W or M, or an "Epsilon". As usual it fits my wife's finger perfectly, she prefers white gold but never turns down a gift. This is the 4th gold ring I've found this year, two at a beach in one hole, one at a campground, and now this totally unexpected one in a farm. It might be old, it might be new. 🤪 Only a small handful of trash again: What a great week it's been! I might get out next week but the holidays are upon us.
    19 points
  31. Hey Guys, Due to my limited time, I haven't had much time on the new Garrett Axiom metal detector. However, my first impression on the unit were pretty good. First, the new Garrett sells for MAP of $3995 or 15% discount for USA Active/Retired Vets. I believe Garrett marketed this unit to fit perfectly into the budget of most gold prospectors and treasure hunters. They also give you the option of two packages, one with wireless headphones and a 11" Mono and 13" DD, or wired headphones and a 11 DD and 13" Mono. Many of my customers have been split on the packages, the ones that want more depth out of the box seem to take the larger Mono packages, while the ones that are looking for max sensitivity to small targets and nuggets go with the 11" Mono. Secondly, overall the unit is very light, lighter than any other gold hunting Pulse Induction metal detector including Minelab's GPX 6000. I also believe Garrett built a bit better design, haven't seen issues with a shaft turning or wobbling as of yet, seems like a stronger design from other similar manufactures. Finally, on the Goldfields, the unit was very stable overall. I used the 11" Mono the entire time the first trip out as I wanted to just get used to the performance of the unit before dabbling too much with the DD and Iron ID. That being said, Garrett does offer the Iron ID on this unit, where most other PI's have done away with any type of iron discrimination (GPX 5000 and prior). Many believe there is still a need or use for Iron ID in trashy locations, which I do tend to agree. The unit was simple to understand without even reading the Quick Start Manual. I charged the Axiom the night prior, let it charge overnight and removed in the morning prior to the hunt. I powered on the Axiom, adjusted the sensitivity, placed in Normal mode, Tone around 55, adjusted my threshold, used in Medium Tracking then did the EMI tune and started hunting. The unit ran really smooth and stable, the only time it was a bit unstable, which happens with most detectors is when a airplane flew over. This would last a minute or two, then calm down. Believe it or not, my first target in a very trashy area was a nice nugget (pictures will come). I couldn't believe it, had to yell over to a friend and say, "Dude do you believe this?" That being said, I spent the next hour or so digging through a bunch of trash and didn't find another piece until later. I only had a few small hotrocks respond, which could easily be ID's when seen. I ended the trip with 4 nuggets, two pretty nice ones and two smaller ones. I also had a nice pouch full of iron rubbish, as I was not using the DD or Iron ID on the Axiom at the time. This will be something else I need to experiment with, as I heard the Axiom does very well with the Iron ID mode. I was hoping for a bit more sensitivity to small targets, as I was running the "sensitivity" almost all the way, but realized later I wasn't in "Fine" mode, which I believe will increase the overall sensitivity to small gold even more than the "Normal' mode. Quick Conclusion - Garrett did a great job on this unit, it's priced right, performs well, very lightweight and will have other searchcoil options available. The unit is super easy to use, almost a turn on and Go detector. I know there are a ton of people going to ask, is it better than the GPX 6000, I'm not going to say that, but I think with the price, performance and a USA made detector, Garrett hit a "Home Run" here. P.S. I don't claim to be an expert on this detector, I have had very limited time on it, but do have over 30 years detecting experience now, so I felt I could give a fair, quick field test on this new Garrett Axiom. May all your targets be Golden! Rob
    19 points
  32. When people familiar with metal detector coils hear certain terms, they think certain things. Here are the three classic coil designs, illustrated in many articles in books, magazines, and the internet. Mono and DD coils are common, concentric much rarer with modern VLF and PI detectors. A classic mono transmits and receives alternatively with a single coil winding, and so is only used on pulse induction detectors. DD and concentric separate the transmit and receive into two separate windings, and so can be used in both PI and VLF designs. Metal detector coil types illustrated - concentric vs DD vs mono Garrett has some unique coil designs, but refers to them by the old terms. This leads to some confusion and incorrect assumptions about how the coils will perform. In a classic sense, a mono combines the transmit and receive into a single coil. Since depth is connected to how large the receive coil is, a mono often had better depth on larger targets than a DD coil. The DD has separate smaller transmit and receive coils enclosed in a housing the same size as the equivalent mono. The smaller receive area often puts the DD at a disadvantage compared to a mono for depth on larger nuggets. A mono tends to be hottest on small gold very near the winding, around the edges of the coil. A nugget next to the winding gets the most benefit from both the transmit and receive phase, since the one winding is doing both. This leads to an odd effect with the smallest gold, where a mono coil has a soft, or non-existent signal in the middle of the coil. A clue to small surface nuggets is when a mono coil gives a double blip, one on each edge of the coil as it passes over the nugget. A classic DD coil tends to have a milder response to small nuggets, since over a lot of the coil surface a small nugget is far away from either the transmit winding, or the receive winding. As a result, with small nuggets you get the best response in a narrow band down the middle of the coil, where the transmit and receive coils overlap. In the last decade mono coils have been more popular than DD coils on pulse induction detectors for that edge on larger gold depth, and users have learned to hunt with the edges when chasing the smallest gold. But DD coils have some inherent advantages in ground cancellation and EMI handling, and Garrett decided to try something different when they made DD coils for the ATX. The main complaint was how narrow the response was on a standard DD coil, so what would happen if that area was opened up, made larger? Here is what they came up with: The coil is wound like a standard DD, but the winding crossover is not at the toe and heel, but in the middle where the inner coil area is created. This creates a coil within a coil, and the secret to the Axion DD is that this is what is inside the solid exterior. It is not a standard DD, but a "Bullseye DD", with a strong target area in the middle of the coil. Please excuse this quick and dirty diagram I just whipped up. I may replace it later, but it gets the idea across. Winding layout inside the Garrett "Bullseye DD" coil The tones refer to the two different tones a PI detector will make on targets. The small item hi-lo tone, and the large item lo-hi tone. The design of this coil results in more complex tone responses than on a normal DD coil. This can be confusing at first, but actually gives a trained operator extra information about the size and depth of the target. Small targets will "tone-flip" front to rear, with the classic hi-lo tone in the center. Larger targets at depth will no longer tone flip, but just deliver a stand hi-lo or lo-hi response. Here is the super critical information I wanted to get across in this post. People just automatically tend to assume mono coils are better on a PI detector, due almost everyone using them. Yet we have seen more interest in some concentric PI coils lately, which have a strong center response due to the way the windings are laid out. The Garrett DD is a unique coil in a class all its own, and it offers a very strong alternative as a small gold coil compared to their mono coil. With the mono and the smallest nuggets, you need to focus on the edges as where the hottest small gold response. With the Garrett DD, it is a more classic response in the middle of the coil. Anyone used to hunting with a coil and assuming the center is where you are going to get the best signal will take right away to the Garrett DD for hunting small gold nuggets. The only caveat is you have to really focus on that center area as being the hunt area of the coil, and overlap your swings appropriately. Keep in mind that the Axiom Iron Check only works with the DD coil. I would submit that a really savvy operator, who pays close attention to the tone flipping characteristics in conjunction with the Iron Check feature, will be able to predict the nature of targets with the Axiom, better than any other PI yet devised. It will not be a VLF. It is something in a class by itself, and if you have a good ear for target responses on PI detectors, the Axiom offers a wealth of information to play with. In closing, just do not forget this. Do not automatically assume the Axiom mono is your best choice and ignore the DD. it is a very bad habit many of us have fallen into, and I was guilty of this very much. I ran the mono almost exclusively early on. But then I made myself use the DD coil, and was surprised to find the more I used it, the more I liked it. All the gold I found on my last trip to Australia was found with the 11" DD coil, which has the same setup internally. It just seems more natural to me to be focused on the center of the coil instead of the edges when chasing small gold nuggets. It is also a quieter coil than the mono, which also helps when running higher sensitivity levels in bad ground. The Axiom 13"x11" DD has a hotspot that is about 6"x5" in the center, where you should focus your efforts on smaller gold. The 11"x7" DD has a very hot 5"x4" center zone, roughly illustrated below. As a final reminder, there are six coils available now, or very soon, for the Garrett Axiom. There mono, and three DD. All three of the DD designs including the 16" DD are actually the Garrett "Bullseye DD" in disguise. These coils are not protected by chips or anything that would block third party support, so I expect we will see more coils soon, either from Garrett, the aftermarket, or both.
    19 points
  33. Happy Thanksgiving to all. Happing hunting for Gold and Relics in the coming days.
    19 points
  34. Nine Thanksgivings ago I found my largest nugget on Thanksgiving Day 2013. I've told the story a few times and posted it on a couple of other forums before I joined here. This link will give a look back and let you remember or get introduced to a few old timers mostly from the Southwestern United States where I found the nugget. It is an Arizona nugget. Introducing the Goose Egg Nugget (22.46 oz Speci) - GOLD NUGGET HUNTING - Nugget Shooter Forums (ipbhost.com) The night before I found this nugget I slept in my Isuzu Trooper and about an hour after I got up I heard this deep target in an area that had been hunted heavily for meteorites. After digging down into the cobbles out came the speci. It is nice to remember it but also sad because some of the people I shared the find with are no longer with us. Have a great Thanksgiving everyone. This is my entry into Gerry's contest.
    19 points
  35. The beach always surprises and delights me. This uniquely designed silver ring hit the Equinox at a very solid 35 so I knew from the get-go it was going to be silver. I have googled "horse head, winged, serpent" trying to find out what that mythical animal is called but didn't get much at all. As far as pictures from the search, they looked more like a "winged dragon with a tail". The slanted shape and the rectangle protrusion on the back of the ring are also a bit puzzling. I think that the thick protrusion is maybe a stabilizer to keep the ring from rotating on the finger maybe? Anyway, I just thought I would toss out the pictures on a post as my finds have been somewhat limited lately and at least it is a precious metal find. LOL If anyone has any info on the creature on the ring or anything for that matter, I would appreciate the help in IDing it. cuniagau PS: It is about a size 6 so it is either a woman's ring or maybe a man's pinky ring.
    19 points
  36. Well the weather sure changed! Two days ago it was almost 80 here, this morning started out at 40 and only made it to 50. Looks like Fall has finally settled in. Went to the big field today, had to wear heavier gloves for a while due to Reynaud's and a pretty stiff wind. Today I used the Deus 2 with a centering device on the 11" coil, it made it much more comfortable to use. In the first 30 minutes I got a faint 81/82, as I dug deeper it got better and better and settled in at 91 at about 10" down, and out came this Civil War Cavalry Bridle rosette, a total shocker for this field which dates back to the 1700s. It had a back plate or tabs, but all that is gone now. Probably popped off. Didn't get anything else but buckshot and bits of metal for quite a while so I changed spots, and stuff started coming up. Got quite a few buttons, the most interesting being the small jeweled button with a green stone: The stone is faceted but is probably glass or paste, it is heavily scratched. The lobed one may not be a button. Two of the above buttons have a basket weave pattern, are thin two piece, and say something about "superfine", but neither has any gilt left. I've found one or two of these here before. The next two were a surprise, although I'm on a streak of finding gold plated buttons with a lot of plating still there. One has a shank, the other does not. They both say "Scovill Superfine" on the back, and have an identical pattern on them. They are cast. And finally, my possibly second best find of the day due to the rosette: An 1857 Seated half dime, the second one I have found here. It was way out in the back. All this pretty much validates my thought that horse racing or some kind of exhibitions took place here. There is a spot in the front field where we have found many old buttons, and a place in the back where spectators or groups of people attended. Trash was pretty heavy today, a lot of lead 😀 I will have to speak to the owner, what I thought was just random grass may be winter wheat. 😵 Might not be able to come back for a while.
    19 points
  37. Today was supposed to be nice, started out at 53 and foggy. I went to a field not far from my house where I got a lot of nice relics and a half of a half reale back in the spring. This field was cleared and turbo tilled in two directions, wow! Really easy to detect. The other nice thing is it doesn't have a lot of modern trash, just iron bits. This is all the trash I got today, fits in my hand. Just some buck balls, percussion caps and odd junk. Hunted for 6 hours, ended up with 6 buttons and some other surprises. Two have visible gold plating, one is silverwash. 3 medium and 3 small. As I was detecting back to my truck, I got this nice 1903 IHP: One of the biggest surprises (well the biggest) was a large cent. Can't quite make out the date but it is there, and can't really determine which bust it is. I was once able to see the wreath on the back and "ONE". it's pretty worn. I also got a couple relics, a thimble and a whatzit. A couple days ago I did a scouting hunt and got these: My favorite is the small decorated concave button. Saved the best for last, got a solid 77 and dug this, I knew there was more Spanish silver here: 1/4 of a 1 or 2 Reale coin. Worn thin, but still heavy. Only got through half this field, I'm sure there is more.
    19 points
  38. On my recent trip to Australia a group of us visited some super pounded locations. All that’s left are tiny bits. The other people all ran the 11” mono because these days everyone chooses mono. I ran the 11” DD almost exclusively, just to be different. The mono coils you need to work the edges to get the smallest nuggets; nosing with the forward edge works well. The DD is hottest in the center, so benefits most from methodical overlapping. People like the mono as the edge helps with pinpointing, but frankly I was able to eyeball the coil center just as well to nail targets with the DD, and grew to enjoy it’s quieter operation in bad ground versus the mono. I suspect people will go mono just because that’s what people use these days, but the DD is not to be overlooked for those who really want to get the best out of the Axiom. You get the added benefit of iron disc with the DD, although I recommend that feature only for use on mild ground. These nuggets (flakes) were found by the group, ten of mine with 11” DD along right edge (I forgot I had a couple more in another vial) and the rest by others running the 11” mono. The smallest weighed 0.023 gram. Going by that and looking at rest, it should be obvious 0.05 - 0.1 gram gold is no problem at all for Axiom, and results smaller than that quite possible for users well tuned for hunting tiny bits. Half the people had never found gold with a detector before, yet all found at least a couple bits. I’ve been trying for a smaller mono for those after the smaller gold, since the 7x11 mono is very good, but still not ideal for the smallest gold. The DD with its hot 4x5 center zone is almost like hunting with a small mono, once you get used to ignoring the less sensitive outer regions of the coil. The main issue there is the inability to get the hot zone in close to a rock or root. The photo below shows the approximate size and location of the “hot zone” for small targets with 11” Bullseye DD coil i.e. targets under a gram. As nuggets get larger the entire coil surface takes over, but the most “punch” will still be in center area.
    19 points
  39. After many years of metal detecting I'm amazed that I still discover nice finds days or weeks after a hunt. A week ago there were bulldozers making winter sand berms on a local beach so I decided to hunt behind them hoping that they would uncover some goodies. Targets were few and far between so I only hunted an hour or two before heading home to beat rush hour traffic. I finally emptied my finds pouch this morning and looked more closely at a small ring that I had assumed was silver. It was dull and a bit rough but when I examined the inside expecting to see "925" I saw "14K" instead. A quick acid test confirmed that it was gold and it cleaned up without much effort. At 2 grams it isn't the biggest ring but $65 in scrap gold value covers gas for a couple more hunts so that's a win!
    18 points
  40. I’m thankful for all who contribute to this fine forum in so many ways. Some just read and gather knowledge while other enjoy posting pics/stories and sharing your experiences. A few wise old men who’ve busted so many pairs of boots to the ground…as well as plenty of young new gunners still wearing metal in their soles and plenty of average Joes to share the fun and tell stories when the sun goes down. You all help in different ways to make this DP forum the best. As a thank you from Gerry’s Detectors. I’d like to have a little fun contest. No I'm not giving away a free $1000 detector like I did last year on here, but a very nice Minelab Detecting Vest with more pockets to lose stuff in. It is a nice vest (see pic at bottom) though and the best part, is just having fun. Share a pic and short story (Simon, notice I said short story) of a “Thankful nugget” on this thread. Contest ends Sunday, 27th at midnight my time. 1 entry per person. The winner will get a Minelab vest sent to them free of charge. Sorry but I do not plan on sending the vest outside of the USA. Sure we all would enjoy seeing your Thankful nugget and short story, no matter what country you are from. So, if you are the lucky drawing winner, then give me a name and address of someone in the US who you would enjoy donating your winning Vest. This allows everyone to play and also gives kudos to those from outside the US who go along. All who post their 1 pic and short story will get their name dropped into a hat and there will be a simple drawing sometime next week. I’ll post the winner and then you PM me your USA mailing address. Again, if outside of the US is the winner, please select someone in the US you would like to donate the vest and I will send it on your behalf. Below is pic of my Thankful nugget. My 1st nugget from South Dakota. I watched Deadwood and was drawn in from the story. A month later a special friend invited me to SD. 1st day in the field, 1st hour and I scored gold in more ways than one. Fun times, memories at dinner (happy birthday to your wife) and just an overall wonderful experience. I'm Thankful for the opportunity you shared with me. Looking forward to having some nice reads and interesting nugget pics to see. Again, Happy Thanksgiving to my DP friends and safe travels during the holiday weekend.
    18 points
  41. Its been 40 years since I swung a detector. The last 3 months have been a blast. Met lots of nice people, hunted a couple of un-touched sites, and hauled a few nice coins out of the ground. Nothing terribly old. This area off northern Alberta was mostly settled in the 1930's. Some highlights include an 1899 English penny (an odd find for this area), 1922 nickel, 1935 cent, two 1943 tombac nickels, a few George V silvers, a 1954 dime (a bit of a key date), and a bunch of pre 1960 silver. The 1948 bronze chauffeur's badge was a nice artifact. Winter's here. Time to pack up the Nox 600, catalog some coins, and start gathering permissions for next Spring. There are a couple of circa 1910 sites that look promising... Cheers!
    18 points
  42. People may have noticed I have largely stayed out of this. I'm well over all the hype, and totally agree with Jason. We are literally announcing announcements now. People are self hyping themselves to death over this, with various interests more than happy to fan the flames. It's totally new? No, it's the next logical iteration I would expect as a followup to the Equinox. Totally new or iteration is just how you look at things. If it has just one thing different some people want it to be totally new, nothing ever made like it ever before. That's what feeds the hype machine - oh my gosh, it's super duper really new magical technology!!!!! One generation, no, two generational leap to the moon technology!!!!!!!! But anyone who has an Equinox and gets a Manticore will find out real fast it's just the next step. Take an Equinox, listen to the feedback for four years, fix the issues, improve what you can, all with an eye to filling the now vacant $1500 E-TRAC price slot = Manticore. The Equinox took everything to the next level, and squeezing anymore performance out with newer models is at the point of diminishing returns. It may not be what people want to hear, but mark my words and remember them later when the dust settles.... this is Equinox Mark 2. I'm not saying that to belittle it. Just the opposite. The Equinox took us all to a new level, and Manticore takes everything Minelab learned from that, and makes it better across the board. About the only thing I'm unsure about is how water hunters will like that new coil with the added superstructure - not going to cut water like the Nox 11". But other than that, this is the perfect machine for somebody that loves the Nox, but wants more. Be nice if they took some of the improvements made with Manticore, and used them to refresh the Equinox with an update also. I really like and enjoy working with the engineers at Minelab, but their marketing people seem to keep getting farther and farther from what I want to see as a down to earth detectorist. Everything about the Manticore release puts me off, with the exception of them letting Mark loose to blab away. That part is fun and informative, as the engineers are usually kept under lock and key. But all this other stuff, even the name.... not turning me on at all. I do miss Bill Stirling and the days when marketing was driven by tech papers and actual detecting experts. Now it's all Chicago style flash, no substance. Except for Mark. I can only appreciate how hard it is for a nerdy engineer type to stand in front of crowds like he has been doing - good on him. Anyway, people are desperate for information, and love to discuss, and that's good, as that's what a forum runs on. I do want to thank people here for having sane and rational discussions. It means I can be off doing other things and not worry some sort of fight will brew up. That is something else to be thankful for today. Happy Thanksgiving!
    18 points
  43. And thank you Gerry for being open to being a part of this, as you and your team have been critical in helping make this all happen. We both were skeptics, that’s no lie. We both have heard too many promises for too long from various companies. Some of them are now gone, because they simply would not listen to what we tried hard to tell them. Thankfully, their demise woke Garrett up, as they decided they did not want to suffer the same fate. There are many people at Garrett who deserve thanks here also. But I’ll just mention one specifically. The many hours I had speaking with Steve Novakovich when we were shooting the 24K videos convinced me that it was worth one last try at working with a U.S. company. Garrett is the last one that seems to really be serious about staying in the game, as I hope Axiom shows. It’s just the first of what I hope will be many other new models, as the company remakes itself as a serious competitor in the 21st century. That’s the promise and the hope at least. Fingers crossed they don’t let us down.
    18 points
  44. Last week I went to Culpeper, VA to attend Diggin In Virginia 52 & 53. This is where 100,000 US troops spent the Winter or 1863-64 and the Battle of Brandy Station took place. This area is know for some of the worst dirt in the USA. Bury a nickel 5" deep and most VLF machines can't see it. On the other hand take a PI and you'll be digging targets the size of bullets 16-18" deep and larger items such as shell fragments and belt plates over 2 feet deep. To top it all off these farms have been pounded over the years so finds can be slim. That being said it's still fun for me to attend and catch up with the many friends I've made over the years and meet some new ones. Now on to the particulars of the GPX 6000 as a relic machine. I've said it before and I'll say it again, I will never go back the GPX 5000 for gold or relics. The 6000 IMO is that good. Water resistant, interchangeable rechargeable battery, wireless headphones, light weight and compact. Everything the GPX 5000 isn't. The only thing the 5000 has the 6000 doesn't is iron reject and I can honestly say I don't miss it. I started beach and relic hunting with the Whites TDI that also lacked iron reject, so I had to learn what iron sounded like on a PI and this knowledge has transferred over to the 6000. Not saying I didn't dig any iron, but I don't fell like I dug any more than anyone using a 5000. Not only that ther are plenty of iron targets I want to find like horseshoes, artillery shells and fragments. I was a little concerned that EMI might be an issue with all the other GPX's present at this hunt. Things can get crowded in good producing areas. However, I found the 6000 to handle the EMI very well, as long as I was at least 30 feet from another machine or not under power lines. EMI for the most part was rock solid with no waiver most of the time. Now obviously I was wearing headphones with all those people around so I can't say if that would be different or not without them. I used the 11" mono the entire time, ran the machine in difficult, sensitivity all the way down, threshold on. That's it! simple settings without having to worry about whether or not I had it setup right. Setup this way, the machine is plenty deep. In fact I had one of my buddies check a deep target I found with his 5000 wearing an 18" coil and he said he could barely hear it. On the 6000 it was a clear signal. Just think how deep you could go using normal timing with sensitivity all the way up. But there's a reason I run difficult timing and you can read my post here if you want to know why. So below is a video and pictures of my finds. I found a lot more than shown like fired bullets and case shot that I just won't display. Also found about 6 artillery frags and only one is shown. I didn't find anything spectacular this time, but did have a great time and dug plenty of targets. Top is an artillery frag and an iron ball used in canister shot, next picture shows what canister shot is. Round balls are case shot which is similar to canister shot. Eagle I cuff, Bullet is a confederate Gardner and finally the display I made.
    18 points
  45. My season in Canada is over now and here’s a look at the good stuff. I finished with 13 gold rings, all with the Deus 2. I hunt fresh water usually waist to neck deep and thus rely almost solely on the audio of the D2. Until this year I’ve only ever hunted with Excaliburs. I have to say, all the programs, modes and settings on this thing were a little overwhelming to me at first and I wasn’t having fun the first few times out. All the discussion on this forum has helped a lot. Being in fresh water I tried several of the inland programs and settled quickly on the General (1) program due to stability and quiet operation. I see General is the only inland program that uses Conductive Soil Subtraction like the Beach/Dive programs. I prefer Pitch Mode for its indication of target depth by pitch, especially on the beaches that classify well. The quiet operation of General (1) combined with pitch mode and a higher Audio Response (5) really lets me hear those deeper targets. Surprisingly when I get a lower pitch audio response indicating a deep target; it actually turns out to be a legitimate size deep target and not a smaller scrap sitting near the surface. The low notch I’m using may be helping in that regard. I run a notch from the point of discrimination (7) to 28. I tried running with and without it and found that using the notch greatly helps me avoid wasting time digging micro crap, especially given most of the time I can’t see the remote. I could possibly be missing fine chains or very small gold but it certainly looks like I’m doing ok in the small ring department. I don’t know the vdi’s for all the rings but the one to the left of the penny was 34. In a quest for depth I started using very low Reactivity but found that combined with my lower underwater sweep speed, I was getting weaker target responses. After some testing I found bumping the Reactivity up to 2.0 greatly improved the target response. There’s definitely seems to be some great descriptive audio. I don’t have a good understanding of it yet so I’ll be digging lots for a while. I asked a friend with a Deus 1 what audio quality he looks for in a good target and his answer was “Smooth”. I think that’s a good word to describe it. I’m using the GGA phones and love them. They have tons of volume, but they do use the Bone Phone output you’re limited to square. At this point I do still feel like I can size and shape a target better with an Excal in All Metal. I don’t expect to learn the Deus 2 audio overnight. Looking at the results of this first season, what really stands to me is the high ratio of small rings I found. 7 out of 13 (54%) were smaller, penny size rings. Typically for me only 10-15% would be small rings like that. It could certainly be just blind luck however my gut feeling is the Deus 2 had a strong hand in it. I’m sold; this thing is a serious water machine! Did I mention its bloody deep? Very happy with the D2 and can’t wait for spring to come. Any feedback from Deus veterans greatly appreciated. Good luck all.
    17 points
  46. Here's my entry. I always like to show my appreciation to landowners, for giving me permission, by giving them a display of stuff I found. Just gave this one to a guy this morning.
    17 points
  47. Our thankful nugget is not the many gold wire and leaf specimens I and my wife have recovered over 30+ summers here in Colorado but being able to experience all the good and bad times we spent detecting those prize specimens. The memories and stories that we are able share make it seem just as exciting and satisfying as the day we found them. Here is a recent wire gold specimen I finished cleaning and mother nature was sure in rare form we she created this one:
    17 points
  48. I’m almost embarrassed to post this after reading about Cal’s awesome token. But I had already taken the closeup pics so here it is. With the time change I have about 45 minutes max to hunt my nearby permission. Got this one tonight in a spot where they have cleared more trees. One more thing: I have that bad habit of rubbing the dirt off to see the date. You can see the fine scratches on the neck area. I’m glad it wasn’t a 1916 D! Lol
    17 points
  49. That was a fun hunt. I think you got the most interesting find , of course. Congratz ! I got this heavily damaged 1858 O seated half. Also a common date, doh ! So this is nothing more than my $7-ish melt value of silver. But hey, it's hard to argue with a seated half, eh ? Also pictured is a Chinese cash coin, and some of the black-smithed green copper snippets that keeps us sitting on the edge of our seats there.
    17 points
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