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  1. After helping Gerry train a fabulous group of customers with their new gold detectors at Rye Patch in northern Nevada, I finally got the chance to get down and dirty with my GPX-6000 on some of the old hammered patches in the region's goldfields during the last couple weeks or so. For me to say that I'm impressed with the 6k's performance at these locations would have to be the understatement of the year; some were like detecting a brand new patch, just with smaller nuggets. Based on my finds, the GPX 6000 seems to be lighting up gold of certain sizes, depths, densities, textures and alloys that have eluded other gold detectors, primarily small nuggets that were too deep for the previous tech. I've also noticed digging more electrum (silver-gold alloy) nuggets with the 6k, as well as surprisingly shallow, larger dinks that had me scratching my head in disbelief that the GPZ 7000 didn’t ping them.🤷‍♂️ All up, 131 nuggets with a combined weight of 3/4 ounce troy: The frost is hitting the windshield in the mornings now, so I'm off to warmer weather and more golden goodies in the sunny goldfields of Arizona! 😎 So long, Rye Patch, and thanks for all the nuggets.
    44 points
  2. One of the places I have permission to hunt will soon be developed and under hundreds of new homes. It's a darn shame because the property sits in a beautiful valley where there once was an old town site dating back to the late 1800's. There are also several old home sites that are nothing more then just dots on the old as maps there are no structures left...all you might find is some bits of pottery and the iron grunt of your detector telling you are in the right spot. I've detected these areas off and on for several years as it's close and I can easily put in a hour or two after work. Recently I was told that I had till Jan 1st and then the land movers will be coming in so I've been going over the place hitting one spot then another...I've made some good silver coin finds over the years but I've had to work for every one of them as the place is no secret and it's been hit hard for many years before I was into this hobby. My main goal was to try and find a $1 gold coin...I just know there has to be one out there around the old town site. The place is littered with head stamps and 22 casings and other low to mid conductors. Yesterday I had had enough of digging junk for mostly nothing at the old town site and decided to hit one of the old home sites...I have detected this area before and found a really nice engraved silver buckle...that time I was with my friend Merton and we had went over the area pretty good but we were mostly cherry picking high conductors. Yesterday I was in a dig it all kind of mood. I was getting lots of brass rivets and some other mid/high conductors and fully expected the next target to be more of the same when out of the hole pops a token..cool the day is saved I think to myself...then just a foot away same signal same reading on the detector and out pops another of the same style token...so now it's game on. For the next hour I stayed in a circle no more than 15 feet in diameter and plucked token after token out of the ground. And for desert I got a very old gold ring with two hearts on it and one gold cuff link...plus a smashed barber dime... today i went back and got another token and found the mate to the gold cuff link. All the finds were with the CTX 3030 all of them were at least 6 inches deep or deeper. Some were faint signals...I went back over it again today with the Nox but no dice. The strange shaped tokens are from a place called "The Palace Beer and Billiards Market St San Francisco" the round ones vary...one says cigar on it the others are hard to read. I figured this was worth posting so I broke out my ole trusty rock from Rye patch and did a photo op. The gold ring is hard to see upper left it's in good shape but has lots of staining from sitting in cow piss for over a hundred years..got it soaking in CLR right now. One of the pictures explains everything...Happy Hunting and Happy Thanks giving. strick
    35 points
  3. Yeah, I know, posting off topic! One of the perks I guess that come with running the place. I can break the rules and not get shown the door. It’s early morning, I have my coffee, and am in a contemplative mood. Tomorrow a lot of us will be celebrating the U.S. holiday of Thanksgiving, many with family and friends, and some of us alone. Like many things I feel holidays of all sorts have been watered down by our busy lives, and the commercialization of everything. When I was young holidays were more real, all businesses except essentials closed, and the country did for a moment pause, and recognize the day. I am gratified to see Target stores announce that, going forward, they will be closed on Thanksgiving. I hope it starts a trend with other businesses. Giving thanks has special meaning for me. I’ve lead a blessed life, with good fortune heaped upon me. Yet like everyone I have suffered my share of pain, death, and despair. None of us live this life unscarred. A decade ago I was well on my way to killing myself with alcohol. Rehab, counseling, and very hard work on my part brought me back from the brink. I can say more than most that I was reborn, my life started anew, when I finally found the strength to stop drinking. People who are on the path I was on often reach a state of despair, of no hope for the future. Everything is bleak, and there seems finally to be no reason to live anymore. One of the greatest tools I was given in rehab was my practice of gratitude. Every day, we were asked to write down just one thing in our life we were thankful for. At the time that was hard, and more an exercise of going through the motions to keep the counselors happy. Now, practicing gratitude daily has become a core part of my spiritual practice. I tend to my body and soul like the gifts they are, and gratitude is the water I use to nourish them. I try every day to take a moment to give thanks for simply drawing breath another day, for seeing the sun rise, for being with my wife and my pups another day. There are people yesterday who made plans for today, and who are now gone, those plans snatched away, their lives at an end. We take so much for granted, we plan for tomorrow and next year, yet the truth is any one of us could leave this earth today. Truly understanding this, knowing how fragile life really is, is a core part of being grateful. Having life itself is not enough though, as many of us struggle to simply survive each day. A measure of contentment to go with life goes lacking for too many. I am supremely grateful, and give thanks, for all the blessings conferred upon me in my life. Family, good friends, good cheer, things that engage my mind, that bring me peace and happiness. I hope you all, no matter who you are, or whether you live in a country where tomorrow is just another day, have a measure of gratitude for things in your lives. Things that make you happy, fulfilled, content, at peace. Happy Thanksgiving! Steve Herschbach https://www.theatlantic.com/family/archive/2021/11/gratitude-thanksgiving/620799/
    35 points
  4. I don't care what you own, like or swing. I know who the King of detectors is at Rye Patch. Over 60 nuggets on my last trip there and part of the time was even after record 100 yr rains saturated the soils. The Minelab GPX-6000 owns Rye Patch for Success and no other detector made (including the GPZ-7000) can get these results. I just love the characteristics of NV gold.
    34 points
  5. Weatherman claimed sunny and 50 degrees today so last night I charged batts and dug all my crap out to get ready for todays hunt! Grabbed the 2300 and the Monster and headed out this morn, 24 degrees when I left the shack. I get to the area I figured should have little if any snow...but NOOOOO. Had to use 4WD, trees across road from previous windstorm so had to hike in, couple inches snow with a few bare spots. Sun never did cut through the fog and hands/feet got real cold. Managed to pop 3 littles (.9g) so actually had a good day considering. SDC got 2 and the Monster got one. Glad I got out even though anyone with half a brain would have stayed home....lol Had a great season and best part is property owners have invited me back for next season. This is the last of them for this season...I'm done!!
    31 points
  6. Hello All, Here is a short video of a very nice crack/crevice we found earlier this year during the Summer Monsoons. Prior to this find, we were just weekend warriors placering various areas and metal detecting for nuggets finding a small handful of nuggets per day. We were not finding anything to really write home about, just the common US nuggets from about a quarter gram and up to 3-4 grams. Working one of these dry creeks, we were hitting a few nuggets in the cracks, but found one we decided to chase down deeper. Normally we don't do this, as digging down several feet or more to bedrock can be a lot of work, especially if you don't recover anything. We had a wild hair, so we decided to do so and this spot paid off very well. As you can see in the video below, the crack started off with two amazing gold nuggets, one was 2.2 ounces solid (just a flat lump) and the other was 1.01 ounces. The gold nuggets were almost side by side in the same crevice as shown. We ended up finding 3-4 smaller gram sized nuggets in the same crevice, but the bedrock popped right up and the gold just disappeared. It was a great moral boost for the Summer season, as it's normally pretty hot and nasty during the Summer Monsoons in the Southwestern US. The tools we normally use are shovels, metal rake, crevice tools, metal detector(s) and pinpointer. We were using the Minelab GPZ 7000 with the new Nugget Finder Z Search 12" coil in this video. The pinpointer we typically use is the Garrett AT Pinpointer (Orange one). Hope you all enjoy the video. If you would like to follow us on Youtube, make sure you "Subscribe" to our channel to see all the new videos. Wishing you all a Happy upcoming Thanksgiving and a wonderful prospecting season. Hope you all have some lunkers under your coils this season! Rob
    27 points
  7. Well my staff/I just finished the season and wrap up of field training for 2021 and our customers...and boy did it go out with a bang and big belly's thanks to Chef Rusty Bucket. Smoked ribs, Bourbon shrimp in garlic sauce, berry pie and ice cream, smoked Brisket, bacon wrapped stuffed jalapenos and more. Wish I would have taken more pics of the food. As I have said before, the food/drinks/people are part of why I enjoy these trips, as I know the gold will eventually come. As many know, Gerry’s Detectors has been training out there at the burn barrel with a few different staff members since the 90’s. We have been using just about every model of gold detector from the top manufactures as well as coils to see what the best results are. The comparisons of customers detectors continue to see the improvements of technologies and capabilities which is what we want. Yes there are times a more expensive detector may not produce the best signal response on that particular targets, but it’s what it is and part of learning. Some of what we found most amazing and it’s exactly what I expected would happen during the training at RP. The gold nuggets being found during the 3 days of class was the most of any session in at least 5+ yrs. More people went home with actual Rye Patch gold than what my staff/I have witnessed in quite a long time. The knowledge shared was the same stuff we always go over, but the knowledge retained was higher. The class size is usually around the same, but the amount of golden smiles of success was better than many yrs prior. We know the VLF detectors when fit with small coils are going to find a few pickers, but to see the bigger PI machines perform so well and produce such higher %’s of beautiful NV gold was most impressive. So lets go over it again to see what my Staff/I observed, in no particular order. Knowledge of customers detectors was actually retained, smiles of happy customers making the right choice of detectors, the amount of successful customers who went home with gold and the overall numbers of gold nuggets dug by the students. There is one thing that I corollate all these positives and it’s the new GPX-6000, period. Yes we had SDC-2300’s, GPZ-7000, GPX-5000’s and the usual VLF’s in the class being learned by the students and those who were there with the GPX-6000 had the most Success. But the success of gold nugget finds was just part of the fun. Ease of operation and simplicity we’ve never seen from a PI Minelab was also most impressive. The customers were actually not afraid of their detectors. They didn’t worry if the timing and or sequence of adjustments was correct, as the GPX-6000 is pretty much a turn on and go. The old way, a big multi page instruction manual (is missing) and now we get a 3 step Quick Start…and it’s true. 1) Turn On. 2) Raise/Lower Coil for 10s, 3) Begin Detecting. Are you kidding me, no way that can’t be true. We just paid $6000 for one of the latest technology fine tuned gold detectors in the world and all we get in the box to help learn, is 3 short steps with a combined total of 10 words? Well folks, it’s all true and so is the amount of happy customers who invested in our training and the new GPX-6000. If anyone thinks there was some other reason for the above, please chime in as all indicators are bulls eyed at the GPX-6000. Overall the trip went exceptionally well consider the 100 yr rain storm that came through while we were down there. I still love the natural beauty of Northern NV in the fall and the colors on the gold nuggets we dug. Hopefully the Spring/Summer class will be just as productive with a group of new enthusiastic customers and more gold being unearthed.
    25 points
  8. The Florida Clan wanted to come for a visit and try some of that Arizona Sweet Tea. Haven’t seen them all in a group for close to 30 years. But, Robin’s and I trip started on Halloween Day from our home in Reno to Laughlin, NV. That’s about as far as I can drive in a day! We cut through Searchlight, NV and passed a couple washes I’d like to revisit. Next morning we cut out to Wickenburg, AZ for a visit with Friends that just moved there a few months back. Mike & Yvonne formally from Rural Oregon made the move to Wickenburg for the love of Team Roping and the Hunt for gold. Didn’t take Mike long to find a Welcome to Arizona Patch which currently is close to a 2-oz patch! (Below in my hand are the fat ones). Mike took me when we arrived to their home for a short swing! It was a hill side small drainage wash that feed into the big wash. I explored the patch and several nearby spots in the Reno Summer like temperature of 87 degrees. I was roasting when I noticed a Cholla stuck to my Boot which I removed with 2 rocks with a dozen or more of its spears stuck deep into the leather! Well 1/4 mile more and they worked their way thru the leather and now poking my foot! We had to leave with no tools to remove needles. Well off to my Folks and a week of fun with my Family traveling the sights from the Grand Canyon, Sedona and Tombstone. Heading back we stopped at Mike & Yvonne’s again for a longer hunt and then hit the local Rodeo grounds for dinner and some cold beers. Again, it was more than warm for this Northern Nevada guy. We seen some likely hills with some colors we liked. I was 3 gullies over (1/2 mile). I just worked up the side hill wash to the top of the hill and swung over to the next wash to work down it and repeat. I heard Mike say, hey the old timers worked this one! Sure enough old dry wash piles. I was up at the head of the wash and he was midway swing up. I pulled a dink nugget out and then Mike got on a string of nuggets. Sure there was some trash, but there’s 9 little nuggets the old timers left us! We know there is more to find at this spot, but water was getting real low and cold beer was at the Rodeo Grounds. Off we went leaving the new patch to catch it’s breath after a 30 minute beating. There’s still plenty of ground to explore in this old placer area(s) of Morristown! What a great Vacation and yes, we are home to nice and cool Reno 😂. Until the Next Hunt LuckyLundy
    25 points
  9. Great results Gerry! Though truth with me be told, it’s all about the gold. The other stuffs a bonus, that I can generally get better other places in my life. When people say the gold does not matter, I ask, “why not go detect for copper nuggets.” Or coins in the park? You can get all the same adventure, camraderie, etc. doing many things. No, me, I like finding gold, plain and simple. It can be gold jewelry, that’s fine, but gold is what I like to hunt, and nothing else really floats my boat like digging a gold nugget of any size. If it’s by myself eating beans from a can, I’m loving it. Camraderie, good food, no gold… that sucks!
    25 points
  10. Found my first Barber yesterday! And a Model T key, too! An old, long abandoned ranch site in the middle of nowhere. No standing buildings or anything, just rubble and outlines. Found both very close to what I think was the house. Both less than an inch deep, on the hard rocky desert. Darn shame that winter snow is probably going to hit soon and lock me out of going back until next year! - Dave
    24 points
  11. Out for the first time in a couple weeks, Water was calm but up and it was good to get wet! After the big flood tides a week ago It was interesting to see the result. Not great but was able to score a couple keepers. One 14k Cameo ring and 4 Silvers.
    24 points
  12. Hey Guys, Well its that time of year where most of the US Prospectors are searching for gold, in the Southwest at least. I managed to get out this weekend with some friends, just roaming around some old stomping grounds in hopes to turn up a few bits missed years prior. I was toggling between my GPZ 7000 with the NF 12" coil and my GPX 6000 with the 11" coil. My other two friends were using the GPZ 7000's with the stock 14x13" coils. Later in the day I can across some old piles left from prior mining and got a softer sounding signal and decided to investigate. My friends both had a few dinks now, so I was behind on the gold count. There's a lot of left behind rubbish in this area due to prior mining, hardrock and placering. I figured it was just another deep nail or something, but as I got down deeper, the target was actually on bedrock below the pile. I ended up scratching everything away from the bedrock and pinpointed the target in a crevice or depression (seen in picture below). Low and behold, it was a nice gold nugget, 4.6 Dwt's, just shy of 1/4 Troy Ounce. I was pleasantly surprised to say the least, didn't expect it. I thought this would be good time to see if my Minelab GPX 6000 would hear this target with the stock 11" coil on it. I walked back to my truck, got the GPX 6000 and hiked back to the target location. I figured this would be a crude, but interesting test as there is so much debate on depth and how now many believe the GPX 6000 is better. I fired the GPX 6000, balanced and make sure the EMI was good, then scanned over the target area with the nugget back in it's original location. I couldn't hear a peep of a signal, which honestly is what I figured. I didn't expect to find it, or hear it with the GPX 6000. I played around with a few settings and even had my buddies come over to check it out. They both scanned their stock coils (GPZ 7000 with 14x13") over it, both heard the target, but it was still faint (not a super obvious signal). This is one reason it's hard for me to put down the GPZ 7000, I have found many nuggets at depth, but deal with the heavy, bulky unit. I thought about going back and trying the 14" DD to see what it would have done, but for the most part, I never use the 14" DD, so it wouldn't have really proved anything to me, as I don't use it. It would have been interesting to see what the 17" coil would have done, but I didn't have it with me. I would think the 17" would have heard it. I'm swinging the GPZ 7000 with the NF 12" Round coil 90% of the time, the GPX 6000 about 10% of the time. There are some bedrock gullies I have revisited in years, so I'm looking forward to spending more time there with the 6000 and 11" Mono coil. I think I also might be able to pack the GPX 6000 into a few canyons as I wasn't easily able to do that with the GPZ 7000. Here are a few pictures below. I didn't have a tape measure, but Doc's pick is 22" handle length. I'm thinking between 18-20 inches was the true detection depth, but faint signal for sure.
    24 points
  13. It happened last year with Craig Douglas (NuggetHunterNZ on DP Forum) finding a 177 Gram gold nugget and now it's happened again, these guys have now found a 121 gram nugget in a creek similar to how Craig found his this time using a GPX 4500 or 5000, not sure which one. And the video of it, these guys make a heap of good videos usually of them dredging but this time it was detecting when they found it. The video has a fair few gold finds on it, Perhaps I need to start looking in creeks more often 🙂
    23 points
  14. I've been pretty busy since I did my last post, "Sometimes you have to mow". Been getting the house ready for Christmas, but I did go metal detecting a few times. I mowed another permission, an old farmhouse site that looks promising: I believe these are cannon carriages, but I'm not sure. there are 3 old buildings here, and a fourth with two silos behind it. Hunting this place before I mowed it was rather difficult, Chase was with me the first time and we really didn't find much in the tall grass. It was kinda interesting though, I dug what I think might be an old Chinese coin, but it has no identifying marks other than the square hole. a couple of buckles, remains of a small pocketknife, one no date wheat, a memorial and a clad quarter. Dug a small pistol ball, brass finial, a small nozzle and another one of those grommets that look like a ring. 😵 Chase had a similar experience. Went back and mowed the place and only searched the area in front of the truck barn and the silos, not much there but it was interesting as well: 3 clad dimes, one 1971 memorial, 4 Zincolns. Nice all brass buckle and a chrome plated peace sign. 😀 Which all brings me to today, I thought I was gonna write "Sometimes you need to mow 2", but nope. Today, Chase came and brought his mentor, I'll call her "Deb". She is a long time detectorist who had helped him along over the years with places to hunt, and a wealth of historical knowledge. We all met at the farm, but we quickly found that she was having a time with digging there because the ground is dry now. We decided to visit a farm we only scouted a while ago, it's pretty big but we didn't find much there the last time except for this little guy: "Deb" read the field, found some musket balls and then moved on to a bit of higher ground, and got us both going finding buttons and all sorts of interesting stuff. Chase knocked out the first coin of the day, a nice green IHP, and one of the most interesting Dandy buttons I have ever seen with a sunburst pattern on it. He generously gave it to "Deb" as a memento of the trip. I wasn't finding much myself: A couple of overall buttons, an interesting front of a two-piece with circles in a triangle, some buckle fragments and a copper nail washer. "Deb" left as she had a long ride home, and Chase and I continued to search the high ground. Finally we headed out across the farm to check out another spot which didn't have much of anything, so we headed back toward our vehicles to call it a day. I veered off to explore another bit of high ground, and I'm glad I did, as the find of the day hit me as a 25/26 on the Equinox, I thought I'd finally found an IHP: I realize this is a long story but the end was worth it if I didn't bore you to death above. 1690 Bolivia or Peruvian mint silver Spanish 1 Real Cob. It's a "pillars and waves" type only minted in one of those countries, the mint mark is not there. 331 years old! Officially the oldest thing I have found. I dragged Chase over to that spot but we didn't get to hunt it long, the farmer came out and told us the area we were standing in was a trading post. 😀 It's literally his front yard. We talked for a long time about the history of the place and ended up with 3 new permissions, but I'm pretty sure we will be back here soon!
    22 points
  15. Last week I spent the whole week in Virginia at the Diggin in Virginia Event. DIV 50 was spread over 4 different farms which comprised of thousands of acres. 5 days 10 hours a day metal detecting, what a dream. I don't attend too many metal detecting events, it's just not me. But DIV is different and offers sites you just can't get on otherwise. Now although some of these farms have been hit by DIV upwards of 10 times, they are still giving up relics. Most of the DIV digs take place in Culpeper County Virginia and is known for it's very hot dirt. VLF detectors struggle in this environment so a PI like the GPX, TDI or ATX are preferred. But you always get the person that can't afford or is unwilling to spend the money to rent or buy a PI and will take a go at it with a VLF. DIV 50 was no exception. I saw many people metal detecting with VLF's I even had a gent check a target for me in the woods that was using a White 6000 DI. I had just dug part of a Shako hat pin and got another signal under a tree root and couldn't tell if it was big iron or big brass (the rest of the hat pin) so had him check it for me, it turned out to be iron. So VLF's will do ok in the woods or in thick iron patches, but out in the fields it's GPX all the way. Right tool for the right job, so come prepared. I always take the GPX and either the Deus or Equinox as backup. If you decide to go, make sure you know your metal detector well. We talked to a group that all had GPX's and didn't find a single relic. They spent their time digging nails. It doesn't matter if you have the best metal detector in the world, if you don't know how to use it, chances are you aren't going to find good stuff. That goes for VLF detectors as well. If you know your machine you can find stuff in the hot Culpeper dirt. Knowing your machine and how to make changes for the soil can mean the difference between success and failure. On this particular DIV, it being 50, some of us figured it may be the last. So my group decided to concentrate on the fields where we knew the Confederates camped prior to the Union Army moving in for the Winter of 1863-64. Other than going to a Union Camp for a day where you have a chance at digging some nice bottles of finding a whole Shako hat pin. We spent our time on a strip of land that boarders a creek where the Confederates camped. On day 2 we went to a part of the farm we hunted last Fall and was finding Gardner, ring tail sharps and 69 caliber round balls. These are all considered bullets used by the Confederates. the camp was located on a hillside that sloped toward a wash that ran into the creek. Last year I hunted that wash and was finding numerous 69 caliber round balls in and amongst the modern fencing and wire pieces. So I decided to hunt my way down the hill towards the bottom of the wash. As I approached the bottom of the wash I started hearing all the wire signals on my GPX and slowed down to investigate each one. I finally got a good solid signal and dug a ring tail sharps. Next signal not more than than 2 feet from the sharps bullet I got a signal that sounded like wire but wouldn't break up so I decided to dig it. When I got down about 12 inches I got my pin pointer out and got a signal in the bottom corner of the hole. I though due to it's orientation in the hole it was most likely a piece of wire. But got my hand digger out anyway to complete the recovery of the target. To my surprise it was a CS tongue, I never in my wildest dreams ever thought I would find one. To make things even better I got the excavation of it on video. Some other highlights of the trip were finding fuses for artillery shells, artillery shell fragments and one of the other guys in my group found a pewter CS saddle shield which is also a very rare find. I had a great time and have made some good friends at DIV over the years. There are a great bunch of people that put together DIV and an even greater bunch of people that attend them. Some of these people have been attending since the very first one and are willing to share their knowledge with anyone who asks.
    22 points
  16. Never thought I'd be finding nuggs in December, a first for me! Prospected a new spot for 3.5hrs yesterday and spot looks promising! I'll be all over it next season. Goldmonster got these......... 2.4g
    22 points
  17. They also showed a guy tossing his Apex in the sand. That kind of disdain for competition does not appeal to me personally. I prefer companies just talk about their product, not takes swings at the other guy. They want to blow off Multi-IQ as just marketing fluff, when in fact it’s a real breakthrough. Multi is nothing special, it’s how you implement it. Whites DFX and Apex, for instance, offer what I call weak multi, that really only benefits on the beach. Nothing special outside that. Multi-IQ however offers true discernible performance benefits above and beyond single frequency, which is why the single frequency modes go almost unused by most Equinox owners. So while NM wants to imply all multi is the same, the truth is exactly the opposite. The secret is in how you process the frequencies, not how many you have.
    20 points
  18. The waves have been small but the tide went out far so I had to have a detect and get my fix. Well ... surprise, surprise ... something I could never imagine. It will be my most unusual find of the month at our metal detecting club meeting. In case you can't read it it says: ADVERTISING CLUB OF NEW YORK ANDY AWARD OF EXCELLENCE
    20 points
  19. I purchased the GPX 6000 from @Gerry in Idaho a few months back and had only taken it out once for about 45 minutes and had to put it away because it was screaming at me due to iron scattered everywhere. Fast forward to this past weekend, I went down to Rye Patch to @Gerry in Idaho's training to really get out and try this thing out. I ended the trip with 8 pieces totaling 3.7 grams, cleaned. The biggest piece was pretty cool so I am including pictures of both sides of that one, 1.5 grams cleaned. All 8 were found right around the burn barrel area. Thank you to Gerry and all of his staff for a great time and knowledge! @Lunk @afreakofnature and the rest of the team.
    20 points
  20. Last Sunday I got a call from my detecting buddy. He's a member of the same detecting club I'm in and known as the guy you call to find lost rings. He said he got a call from a lady who lost her wedding ring somewhere on her property between the house and her chicken coop and wanted to know if I wanted to help him search for it. I said sure! I had only done that one time a few weeks before when we were detecting in a park and a parks supervisor came up to him. He thought we were in trouble and promptly started showing the supervisor how we take great care closing our holes, but the supervisor said he didn't care about that. He said he had gotten a call from a lady who had lost her wedding ring a week before at a playground and he wanted to know if we would look for it, which we promptly did. Unfortunately we didn't find that ring. So we headed out to the mountain property and met the lady and she showed us where she thought she had lost her ring the day before. I thought it must be laying on the ground in plain sight somewhere and this should be easy. Then I saw the chicken coop. Oh boy. I hit inside and outside the coop while my buddy took the trail from the house to the coop. The chickens were pretty well behaved except the rooster who kept giving me the stink-eye. I had a feeling he was just waiting for me to turn my back on him. We covered the 200x30 foot area pretty well for several hours, double checking each others search areas. We were about ready to throw in the towl when my partner decided to check the wooden walkway between the house and the garage. There were openings between the slats that the ring could have dropped into so the home owners offered to pull a few slats up to allow the detector access underneath. While they were ripping up the floorboards, I decided to wander back down the path toward the chicken coop to check any areas I may have missed. As I neared the door to the coop a garden hose caught my eye about 25-30 feet down hill from the path. I was going to sweep that area earlier after finishing the coop area, but the owner said she hadn't been down there so not to bother with that area. For some reason the hose intrigued me so I started searching down the hill from the path. When I reached the hose I was picking up the brass fitting with loud and clear 25 on the Nox but also with a lower fainter tone mixed in. I pushed the hose fitting back a bit and got a solid 7 from multiple angles. I couldn't see anything on the ground, so I pulled my pinpointer thinking it was probably foil of some kind while gently scraping away the pine needles and a little dirt and there it was, the ring! A beautiful Platinum wedding set with a 1 ct. center stone surrounded with 2 baggettes and 6 smaller diamonds. I yelled out, "Bingo!" and the owner and her husband ran down the hill. They were overjoyed and so was I. My first ring recovery! They offered a reward but we politely refused so they insisted that we take a donation for the Metal Detecting Club, for which we were very appreciative. What a day that was!
    18 points
  21. Hello All, I have a lot of video footage and pictures from earlier this season, mostly around the Summer time. I'm just getting some free time to get some of the stuff uploaded and posted. I figured this would be a nice nugget to post and see right before the Thanksgiving weekend. This piece was found under about a foot of hardpack, caliche gravels. This particular gold nuggets, as seen in the video was wedged in a bedrock crack/crevice. Just makes you think how many years (hundreds, thousands?) this piece has been hiding there. The nugget was difficult to remove from hand tools as we didn't want to damage the piece not knowing the actual size or shape. We ended up using a Hammer Drill with a chisel bit to extract the gold nugget. The nugget ended up weighing right at 1/4 ounce solid. We also found another smaller one, about 1/2 Gram in the same crack prior to this piece. I dug the first smaller one out, but knew it was way too loud of a signal on the GPZ 7000 for it to be that small nugget. Low and behold, we scanned over the spot again and the signal was pretty much just as load as originally. Tool used were the Minelab GPZ 7000, Minelab GPX 6000, Garrett AT Pinpointer, hand tools, picks and the Hammer Drill. Here is a short video below of the gold nugget find and extraction. Wishing you all a Happy Thanksgiving. Thanks God we are able to enjoy such a wonderful hobby searching for gold. P.S. If you enjoy these video, Subscribe to our Nuggethunting channel to follow us. Thanks for watching. Any comments are appreciated.
    18 points
  22. Scored a couple keepers Tuesday's 3 hour hunt. Two 10k golds, just a little over 14.5 grams total and 4 more silvers for the pile. Water was a chilly 54F but the Sun was shining so it made for a Great day in the water. Going to be a interesting day Friday, super low tide all day.. Do I go recon a 2019 Hot spot (sanded in last trip there) or go back to the "Now" Hot spot?
    18 points
  23. I have been on the hunt for the British.
    18 points
  24. First gold ring with PulseDive I’ve spent the last month extending my search underwater.. I’ve been using two small pony bottles which give me about 50 bars of air (the reserve of a 12 litre tank).. This lasts me about 20 minutes at 4-5 metres and to refill the little tanks takes about two hours with a small 12 volts scuba compressor (it overheats quickly even with a large fan on it).. This might sound like a waste of time and in many ways it is.. That’s why I’m saving up for a PotraHookah, which will give me 4 hours at a maximum of 10 metres, with a 4 hour battery recharge time (small lithium battery).. I’ve already found a lot of coins and even more bottle tops and other crap, that’s the beauty of a dig it all detector.. The ring was buried about 1’’ deep and gave off a weak signal which I nearly ignored as just more crap.. I guess I still have to put in a bit more time on the PulseDive to get in tune with it.. I don’t really mind learning the nuances of another detector as it’s a great pleasure to be back underwater, this time to combine two interests.. I’ve been scuba diving since 1986 when I got my FAUI diving licence and a PADI instructor since 1996.. I stopped logging hours underwater at 3500 hours, and that was about a decade ago.. The PulseDIve has turned out to be a great detector, especially with the 8” coil.. I just wish they made an even bigger coil for it.. I’ve thought about the Seahunter with a 14x10” coil but if I’m going to save up for a PortaHookha that’ll be a long way in the future, as they cost AU$ 1400.. In the meantime I’m sure the PulseDive will prove value for money, if only in terms of sheer enjoyment!
    17 points
  25. Found this today in the grass at a Park. I was using my Equinox 800. This is the best thing that I have ever found metal detecting. It weighs 43.5 grams and is marked 18K.
    17 points
  26. Yesterday, I went to a park in an older community 20-minutes north of where I live. I found 2 quarters, 6 dimes, 2 pennies and a Hot Wheels. For me, this is a respectable haul. On my way home, I spotted a grocery store and stopped to pick up a few items. When I returned to my car, I saw this lying on the asphalt a few inches from my front wheel: It’s marked.925, is 20” long, and weighs a smidge under 25 grams. My question is, does the International Brotherhood of Metal Detectorists’ Code of Conduct allow me to claim bragging rights for this as a legitimate “find”? After all, I hadn’t yet returned home, and wouldn’t have been in that particular parking lot on that day and time if not for going detecting. But my detector was in the trunk. Part of me wants credit for travel time, like any plumber or electrician. But part of me feels like this is cheating! (BTW, inspired by all the Good Samaritans on this forum, I left a “Did You Lose Something?” note on the grocery store bulletin board instead of just pocketing it.)
    16 points
  27. I’m sorry to see so much drama and high emotion stirred up over what should be a simple, happy event. The introduction of a long awaited detector, one with a fabulous set of features at a fantastic price. Yet another option for people, in an area that once had few options. A little late is one perspective, another is that this company has in a few years gone from unknown, to in all probability passing up First Texas and Garrett in the multifrequency realm. That’s an impressive achievement. On top of that, Dilek has been perhaps the most communicative metal detector company representative to ever grace the internet. One who is no doubt overworked and under a great deal of pressure right now. So how about everyone turn down the volume and relax a bit. It's metal detecting folks. This is supposed to be fun.
    16 points
  28. I have owned two Deus detectors, and have almost bought an ORX a half dozen times in the last year. I like the XPs a lot, but they were always just a hair shy of getting me permanently on board. The Deus 2 puts it over the goal post, at least on paper, as adding waterproof adds a whole new dimension. Sorry, no, I was never impressed by the original Deus as regards that. But Deus 2 to 60 feet easily adds comfort that Equinox owners now lack based on three years history. And multi of course. Still, I was hanging back, in no rush to pull the trigger, as winter is setting in, and frankly, there are other options also appearing at this time. It seemed wise to wait and let the dust settle. But I knew deep down a Deus 2 was probably in my future. I want to credit forum member and dealer Kickindirt for nudging me across the line, with an offer of a good deal that I would be silly to refuse. He cast it as an appreciation of thanks for the forum, and that as much as the deal gave me a nice warm fuzzy this morning. So thanks Joel, a very kind gesture on your part, and appreciated. It's not like I'm pushing for first in line, more like last, whenever Joel takes care of his other folks. But I do have a Deus 2 with 9" coil on order, along with a set of the underwater bone phones. I've always had issues with regular audio phones underwater, and have always wanted to try bone conduction headphones, as they are used by professional and military divers in many applications. Another unique option from XP, and one I look forward to reporting on someday. Using ordinary waterproof headphones underwater, the ear fills with water and hearing is often lessened. BH-01 sits in front of the ears on the cheekbone and transmits sound to the inner ear directly through vibrations applied to the bones, without straining the eardrums. Your ears are therefore free. You can also use these headphones on land with the freedom of being able to hear your surroundings or, conversely, to isolate yourself from noisy surroundings with ear plugs. BH-01 also allows the hearing impaired to feel the vibrations generated by the targets towards the cochlea, or simply the vibrations depending on the type of alteration of the hearing system. Adjusting the audio frequencies downwards (100 to 300 kHz) could further improve perception depending on the disorder. Specifications IP68 certified: waterproof up to 20m deep Multi terrain: underwater and for windy and noisy environments Designed to last, 5 Year warranty Made in France
    16 points
  29. Well, you may remember some time ago I said I was going to go back and see what the girl lost, she did spend virtually a full day at this spot under the ski lift trying to find whatever it was she lost, by half way through the day she had an army of helpers trying to help her find whatever it is. She must have lost it the day before as she came back armed with a metal detector. Well today was the day I finally decided to go see what it was she lost. I waited until the snow had melted enough to get up there in the first place and I picked a day where it was overcast as I hate heat and climbing that far up the mountain I'd overheat, I'd be like some guy trying to drive a little mini car up the mountain full of people, the thing would explode from overheating before it gets to the ski fields base building, well that would be me walking up to this spot on a sunny day 😛 This is the poor girl during winter trying to find whatever it was she lost. She dug a huge hole. I never did work out what detector she was using but at the time it was making a hell of a racket, I think I know why as now when I had my Nox up there it was going crazy too, it turns out on that lift directly between each of the lift poles is an underground high voltage power line, it goes up into each lift pole. It was making my Nox go crazy. I had to run the sensitivity really low in a frequency of 10kHz for the Nox to even be usable. No idea what her detector was but it was likely confusing her completely as she seemed very frustrated with it and I think she'd borrowed it off someone for the task and had no idea how to use it. Her recruits, just people that saw her there all morning and by afternoon felt compelled to help, there ended up way more than that by the end of the day. 🙂 My wife and daughter decided to tag along as they wanted to go for a walk to the lake, there is a cool lake up on the mountain, this lake is about 1800 meters (5905 feet) above sea level so remains frozen all winter and well into summer, in winter you ski across it, people even camp on it that are climbing to the top of the mountain as it's nice level ground. She took some happy snaps of us walking up to the lake area. We are walking a cross a creek here, the creek disappeared under the snow, was a bit scary as I wouldn't really want to fall into the creek, the snow was still thick and firm enough it wasn't an issue. and the lake.... slowly starting to melt A lot of it was still thick enough to walk on, one side must get more sun and melted sooner. Anyway, after that I had my mission to find the spot the girl was searching, I knew she didn't find whatever it was as she was there until the ski field closed. This was taken from half way up the walk, I had to get to where I've marked in the photo. A lot harder without ski lifts 🙂 It's a lot steeper than it looks in the photos. Off in the distance there is the base building where my car is parked. I got to the spot, you'll notice in the earlier photos with her doing it she was just past a lift pole. Now to find whatever it was, I expected a ring or something with her motivation to try find it, something very important to her anyway. And I found it, a phone! It's sitting just above the center of my shaft in the photo, to the right of that is a little bit of a creek, and the phone was in-between those grasses in the creek, hard to eyeball, easy to find with the detector screaming on it. I doubt if I went up without the detector that I would have found it. A couple of photos of the area from up there Looking up from where I found it. The lake is straight ahead in this photo, you can't see it in the photo though as the little grassy ridge line is blocking it. I did a little more detecting on the way back down, mostly just under the lift cable and found another phone much lower down. People drop phones on the lifts all the time as they rip them out to take photos and drop them and they instantly sink into the soft snow under the lift never to be seen again, until it melts 🙂 I found a couple of $1 coins, ended up giving them to my daughter who bought a block of chocolate with them. So my tally for the day wasn't all that good, it was mostly hiking and climbing in the end, only about an hour on the detector I'd guess and we left at lunch time as the ladies wanted to go shopping 😛 The Nugget Finder solid skid plate was awesome on the 11" coil for sliding on the snow, perfect for the job. It just glides along. I think that's a bit of broken gold jewellery, 2 NZ $1 coins and a weird Asian coin of sometype. At first I thought it was a washer. The phones.... hers is the black one to the right. Inside a secret compartment was her credit card and drivers license, so we'll be able to track her down and give it back, a girl in her 20's, she has a NZ drivers license so must live in NZ, I doubt a Queenstown local or she'd likely have gone back up to try and find it by now. My wife's going to track her down on Facebook to get it back to her, it might have important photos on it's SD Card as she was obviously desperate to try find it. If not we will hand it into the boys in blue or ski field and they can track her down. The ski field will have her details from her buying a pass. Well, all in all a bit of fun, and at least now I'm not constantly wondering what was so important that she lost that she'd spend an entire day trying to find.
    16 points
  30. My 2021 New Years Resolution (and I think my 2020 one, too) was to find sites I hadn't previously searched rather than to put all my eggs on cleaning up what's left of familiar sites. (I still do some of that, too, though). This year I've already reported on four previously unsearched (by me, that is) sites, all which have produced. More on those in my year end summary in a month. Early in November I decided to make one more try for 2021 at finding some new ground and with the help of HistoricAerials.com, I found four promising locations. I'm going to simply refer to them as sites 0, 1, 2, and 3. Site 0 is the easiest to report on. From early 20th Century USGS topos it was a small (one room?) school that disappeared around 1950. A drive by showed that not only is it now a private home, but that the intersection where it was located has been seriously reworked, i.e. enlargened. At best it falls into the 'private permission' category and I'm not at all good at those. Site 1, with added help from Google searching, was an elementary school and high school back at least to the eary 30's. The HS closed in the mid 60's and the elementary school a few years later. The building is still there but there are mixed signals as to whether it's public or private. Some threatening signs indicated at least part of it is currently privately leased, but the a__holes are very vague about what is and isn't theirs. I spent 1 1/2 hours in a couple spots with promising results (see photo of good finds below) but I just didn't feel comfortable. There was a lot of coming and going by various groups (sports participants, church goers, etc.) and although no one bothered me I just didn't feel welcome. Site 2 was another small elementary school. I don't know when it was formed but it appears to also go back to early in the 20th Century. I think it closed around 1960. It's now a small public park and community center. Unfortunately both my visual (internet) research as well as detecting and viewing the site in person makes me think it's been heavily reworked since the school was torn down. First hunt there, 3 1/2 hours, produced 2 Wheaties and a sterling ring, plus a fair amount of modern coins and trash. That was my survey hunt. My second trip there was intended to focus in on a trashy but potentially less overfilled part with the ML Equinox and 6" coil, but that wasn't very fruitful. About 2 hours in I was approached by an elderly (81 year old) friendly neighbor who filled me in on some history. He said he had attended that school as a youngster (presumably around 1950) and told me that although several detectorists had been there before me, as far as he knew they had never searched a slope near one edge of the property where he said he used to play and that bulldozers hadn't bothered. Now that's the kind of info I like to hear! I thanked him and headed over there. For now I'll leave it at that and tell more in the show-and-tell portion of this post. He twice more returned and told me of some other nearby sites I should search but they all sounded like private properties. Site 3 is an active, modern elementary school which replaced an early one built around 1955. I was able to go there during their Thanksgiving recess. Unfortunately this site has been heavily reworked since the original school was razed and it also feels like it's been rather thoroughly searched. In 7 1/2 hours (two days) of hunting I only found 2 Wheats plus one other oldie (more on that shortly). OK, here is the eye candy you've been waiting for: Top two items are from Site 1 -- 1983-D nickel-clad half dollar (only my second ever) and a necklace chain and pendant which was clean but unfortunately apparently (magnetic) nickel plated copper. Both were reasonably shallow but not on the surface. Based upon these finds I don't think this part of this site has seen detectors in 2 or 3 decades. Now the finds are in pairs from lower left. Site 2 produced this sterling ring with stones (don't know if real, but they look nice to my eye, and especially to my wife who has already claimed it!). Thanks to that 81 year old former student I found the 1899 Indian Head Penny on the virgin slope where he used to play. Turns out the EMI was so bad I had to use 4 kHz on the ML Equinox and its dTID rang up in the high 20's (silver coin zone), not 20-ish where they show up in MultiFrequency. It was only about 4 inches deep. Next two (silver alloy 'Warnick' and broken piece of jewelry) were found at Site 3, showing that there are a few spots which haven't been backfilled. The broken piece showed up in the USA nickel zone (dTID 12-13 on the Equinox) and given its size I think this is high conductive composition. Both ends show that they were broken off something larger (bracelet?) and the fact there is zero copper coloring there makes me think this could be a silver alloy. Finally, the last two items on the right were found this past week in my bread-and-butter 2021 site, the 'Wheatfield', not one of these four recently reserached sites. The ring has a men's wedding band shape but is marked '925' so sterling. (My wife has claimed it, too.) The IHP is a 1901. In my two times searching there last week I found 5 Wheat pennies each day (3 hour hunts per day). I expect to spend my last few hunts this year at that site. I'm sure there are more oldies and I'm shooting for a record year (quantity) of Wheat penny finds. I only need 5 more to tie last year's 103. The above picture is the 'good'. Here are the 'bad' -- interesting (?) non-coin finds from these four sites: And if you want to see 'ugly', you'll have to await a future post.
    15 points
  31. Been a while since I posted any of my finds. Hit the beach earlier and you can see the idiots beefed up the jetties that are in the wrong direction and added some pilons that do diddly. Houses will eventually get undermined and I will gain more beach to detect on! Seems to be the work of a private contractor and not the army corp of engineers. Anyway s only found a little bit of clad and currents seem so bad even found an Australian coin! 🙂 Those coins are HUGE!
    15 points
  32. Actually I was just being a cantankerous old fart! And still am. JP saying he would hunt gold if it was worth nothing. No you would not JP! You be hunting silver nuggets, or platinum nuggets, or whatever, but not something worth nothing. I’m sorry folks, but I’m calling everyone out on this one. The fact gold has value is the prime driver, always has been for all of history. Buried deep in all of us is a desire to “strike it rich” and every nugget signal I get triggers that deep down “maybe this is the big one” bell. Sure, I like digging nuggets of every size, but I’d be lying if I did not say that every outing I’m hoping for the big one. Now that’s not to say there are not plenty of people who just want to find a nugget, any nugget, and are willing to spend far more money than that nuggets worth to find it. But for every hobbyist of that sort, there are a hundred Africans trying to feed their family with their metal detector, and nearly every one of them hopes to make the big find, to strike it rich. It’s what drove the people from the east coast to travel across the U.S. to California in the 1800s, that drove the Australian gold rushes. That’s what is coursing through our veins, that drive to find gold, and the dream of making the big score it represents. Or it sure is what is driving me, at least. And I can’t imagine anyone looking for gold nuggets, even the most casual hobbyist, not hoping they will be the lucky one, swing that coil, and dig that monster nugget! The hope lurks in all of us, realistic or not. I don’t know, maybe it’s unseemly to be saying it, as I’m a rare one to spit it out, but darn right, the price of gold and what that nugget is worth does matter to me. If gold was $10 an ounce, I’d probably be coin detecting instead. Some of those old silvers bring a nice buck…….
    15 points
  33. Today promised 68 degrees and sunny, unusual for an early December day, but I've seen it hit 70 here at Christmas. Then it snows. 😀 I decided to go to the new "trading post" site where I dug the 1690 Cob, just to try and find the edges of the sweet spot. My little buddy was there waiting for me, he came out meowing and purring. He's being fed, I gave him some fresh water and played with him a bit. First off I went to the long road to the farmer's house, like me his driveway is about a half a mile long. There is underground power here, I can hear it. This field is an easy one, sand mixed with clay, and open until spring because it was a bean field. There isn't much trash in it either, not like many of my other spots. It was cut pretty close. My first find was unexpected, a small silver pin that may be sterling but has no hallmarks. It's definitely not aluminum but it appears to be stamped. here is the rest: All pretty much what I expected to find here, very much like the fields in front of my house. Old Spectacle type buckle, lead bag seal with an "R" on it and "Trade 323" on the back. Clad quarter 1977 found near the driveway. Copper spoon handle piece. Small buckle fragment that is near ferrous. An extremely old button (maybe pewter) with a large shank, it might be an octagon but time took its toll. Copper pin, small Tombac stud. Bottom row is what appears to be a bent trigger guard, it's brass and flattened. Old drawer pull and another Tombac piece. Trash wasn't bad, somebody is practicing their swing 😀
    14 points
  34. Since I am now a snowbird full time and will be living out of my 1995 4 cylinder Tacoma, I had to get creative to deal with everything from foul, rainy weather, wind, cooking, computer work station for editing my YouTube videos, sleeping, storing food for weeks, even months on end, showering, accessing my detecting gear, powering my ICECO 60Ltr. Fridge/Freezer, batteries for everything from detector, phone, computer, power tools and anything else I get that consumes power, my bases are covered. I utilized a ladder rack and added 1x8 and 1x3 boards to the sides, and then outfitted the top with a 4x7 ft sheet of 5/8" plywood. I then stained it with solid base olive drab stain. Next came taking a large military canvas tarp, cutting it down to four sections according to the measurements of each side inside the truck bed. I then got some 1"x 1.5" boards and fitted them to the top edges, folded the boards over the canvas and screwed them in place. Everything is a tight fit and the canvas is sandwiched between the interior boards and the exterior boards. The bottom edge is long enough to hang over the top edge of the truck bed when I am at camp. They will be tucked inside when driving, unless it is raining to shed water outside the truck bed. I have a tie down screwed down to the ceiling to hang a lantern for light and heat. On the driver's side I added three vertical boards to the exterior horizontal boards and put hinges on them to attach a counter top to accommodate my camp stove as well as space to work at the computer. My inspiration for this was a dream I had about a fold down bed attached to the ladder rack and it evolved into the work counter. I hang my solar panels from the passenger side upside down to angle them up to receive the sun better. I still may add the fold down outside bed platform if I can think of a way to still accommodate the solar panels. Well I just now figured it out so that will be a upcoming project. I keep my Jackery Explorer 1000 solar bank locked inside with heavy chains and paddle locks and my fridge is locked to the truck bed in the same manner. I am never out of sight of my truck and if I ever do, then I employ my 5th Ops perimeter trip alarm. Booby trapping the truck with Carolina Reaper pepper powder when it is detonated by would be theives. I have back ups for back ups living this way. That's how I roll. Hope y'all enjoy this creative setup and get some ideas to make your rigs better outfitted, if you don't have a camper. This enables me to get to very remote areas and enjoy creature comforts for long periods of time.
    14 points
  35. Was out today to a local park and came across a strong 32-38 signal on the Equinox. I raised the coil and it still was loud. I thought it was going to be deep junk, but there were a couple 32s that showed consistently on the screen. I was not aware that 1967 was still 40% silver. Equinox, 15" coil, Park 1, 23 sensitivity, 4 Recovery speed, All metal
    14 points
  36. I went back out a few good ones showed up..
    14 points
  37. I have been pretty consistent finding a few meteorites hunting the gold basin placers lately, nice finding something in between finding a nugget. I’m averaging at least a tiny piece of gold maybe about 75% of the time most of these have been shallow 3” down or less and ring strong out on the 6000 like a large caliber bullet on the surface, they are a great motivator to dig all the trash sounding targets because they sound just the same.
    14 points
  38. Dear Valued Members, Business aside, on a personal level, I really care about this group as it brings together some of the most intellectual and well spoken people together...therefore, on this important day, we should all leave business, metal detectors, competition etc. all aside and focus on the most important things in life and feel grateful for our healths, loving families and friends and think about all those around the world who are just as not lucky.. HAVE A GREAT THANKSGIVING!
    14 points
  39. Since I can't snorkel, I modified the metal detector. I lengthened the Nokta Makro Pulse, changed the vibration motor to a handlebar position, and added spring wires to the tube for easy storage! I think it's pretty good
    14 points
  40. Every MF detector made prior to the Equinox used multiple I/Q demod techniques so Multi-IQ doesn't really say anything. What the Equinox did was to expand the specific frequency combos for the different modes, and ML wasn't the only company with that idea. The White's V4 definition had that and more, as does my recent FTP patent. This is just an evolutionary step in detector design and It stands to reason that every other new MF will adopt it. Once you have an MF platform, including multiple MF modes is relatively easy. It's the DSP that ain't easy, and because it's all in the micro it's a pretty sure bet NM didn't copy that. So I disagree that NM is copying ML's creation, no more than companies did with the technologies of TR-Disc, VLF motion disc, tone ID, and displays. Everyone moves ahead or gets left behind. In this case ML is the innovator and NM is the follower, and there's nothing wrong with that. NM might end up with a better product, or maybe not. Or maybe an OK product that doesn't leak. In any case, it much ado about nuthin' and no response from Dilek about all this would probably have served NM better.
    14 points
  41. I've struggled to like my Simplex since getting it, I guess it's totally my fault as I expected more from it than it should and could provide for a detector in it's price range I guess. It's loaded with great features and build quality is fantastic but the performance of it was rather lacking for what I use detectors for and that's finding deep silver coins in mild soil, a situation where the Simplex really doesn't do well in it's standard setup., I admit I've not tried a bigger coil than the stock coil on it although other detectors with that same size coil do better by comparison and even older cheaper detectors do better than it with their stock setups at that task. I've heard a lot of people say where the Simplex does well is sorting out good stuff from trash, some saying it's better or equal to high end detectors at this task so I thought I'd try it out in a rather unusual situation of digging the trash (nails) and leaving everything else. I have another block of land behind my house that used to have an old house on it that was burnt down some time ago in a accidental fire before I bought the land, when I first started detecting I found a number of reasonably shallow old coins in this area, I suspect it was someones coin collection that lived in the house as they were unusual coins from all over the world and in good condition like they'd not been in the ground all that long, they cleaned up well. These were mostly found with my T2 which I find amazingly similar to the Simplex in performance. I've recently killed all the grass off an area on that land and leveled it as it was a bit lumpy as it's only had sheep on it the past few years before I started clearing it and planting a bunch of fruit trees. The idea was to use this part of the land that I've cleared off grass for a parking spot for a caravan which I believe Americans call a trailer? once I get gravel compressed down on it. I first marched out there and tried to use my CTX 3030 and the thing drove me nuts, I don't understand it enough to deal with the mess of targets in the area from the old house being demolished I guess. I tried the Nox with Coiltek 10x5" coil and it was easier for me to understand as I've used it to death, although there is so much trash here I just wanted to get rid of any old nails that could give the caravan a puncture, so just shallow nails and the Nox was rather annoying with the various target ID's all over the place for many targets and nothing was a reliable dig me I'm a nail guaranteed. Then it hit me people talking about the Simplex in high trash. So I fired it up, and to my surprise with the sensitivity on really low in the Park 1 I was able to cruise over the area and dig up nail after nail easily, no confusion as to what was a nail at all, the ID'd as 4 every single time. Nice solid 4's. It made it so easy to clear the area of nails. So the Simplex nailed it 😛 I left anything deeper in the ground only wanting to recover the shallow targets that were at risk of going into a tire. Unfortunately during the process I didn't hit any ID's that were exciting enough to think they were a good coin but I really found the Simplex really quick and easy to target the shallow depth nails with accuracy in among all the other junk in this area. If I get bored I'll experiment more and dig other ID's of shallow targets and see what I've missed. I know it's a bit of a pointless post, but I just found it cool how easy and effective the Simplex was for the task and every single nail in that photo came up an ID 4 even though they're different size nails and some bent and some straight. The big metal things I dug as I just wanted to see what they were 😛 I must say the Simplex tones are horrible, on these nails it sounded like I was murdering a chicken.
    14 points
  42. Last night It was warm so I took my off road mower out across the fields to the racetrack farmhouse. It's about a mile and a half from my house, and I don't have to drive on public roads to get there. Headed up there this morning, it was a beautiful day. Got up to 74 today, Indian summer in the mid Atlantic. This is the place that had the long grass from two posts ago. Because the grass was so high I knew that if I cut it down I would find more, and as usual I was not disappointed. I cut it to 4.75 in. because I feared there would be obstacles for the mower, luckily there weren't except for the well. It was easy to get the coil close to the ground. Today I went low and slow, only got through half of it. The finds were pretty interesting, I wonder how I missed them. Most were pretty deep, about 6". Dug a brass skeleton key stamped 48, a piece of shoe buckle, a lead ox knob, an interesting rein guide in great shape. 4 wheats, oldest 1932, newest 1950. A copper button with no shank, the back is pretty corroded but there is a maker mark, I'll have to clean it more. A really interesting button that was shot with a .22, the bullet is still in it. It is very ornate, appears to be two piece, and has an indistinguishable backmark. The last coin is an 1895 IHP. Here is a closer look at the button with the bullet in it: And the back: Pretty good shot. 😀 Shame though, it's one unique button. Anyone recognize it?
    14 points
  43. Rang in a solid 28, so I had a good idea it was going to be a ring. The field has a TON of trash that rings up in the 20's... mostly buried aluminum can pieces and random car parts. There are large power lines that cause interference with the wireless module which causes it to drop out a lot if I am walking in a certain direction. If I turn around, the issue goes away. Equinox 15", all metal, Park 1, 7 recovery
    14 points
  44. It’s just good hunting skills and a little luck. I’ve done it, and everyone that detects long enough does it. I can go into a park that’s been detected by thousands of people for decades, and bang, make a nice find. It usually gets ascribed to some latest new detector, and the “found good stuff in hunted out ground with new detector” theme is so old and repetitive now as to be a bit of a joke. I can grab a 20 year old Fisher CZ-5 and go do the same thing. I might put the 5” coil on and head to the trashiest part of a park. Then get down and dirty, hunting hard and careful, the real secret being approach and coil control. Countless targets are masked by adjacent trash if swept from all but a single magic angle, and large coils contribute to this. Careful hunting in trashy areas with small coils and just getting lucky with the right angle and sweep, can almost always pull up another good find in so-called hunted out locations. An old rule is to hit a good location from eight directions. North to south. South to north. East to west, west to east. Then same deal with the diagonals, southwest to northeast. This entire concept is about the fact that a coin next to a couple pieces of trash will be masked unless hit with exactly the right sweep from the right direction. By definition these are “iffy” signals, as they will only respond from one direction. My specialty is hunting hunted out ground. As a nugget hunter, I clean up pulling gold out of ground others walk away from because “there is no gold left.” Frankly, most detectorists are not very good at detecting. Most people simply don’t have the patience for extremely slow, methodical detecting. Coils used and coil control matters more than almost any other single factor in detecting, and is the main reason why coil selection is a number one factor for me in choosing detectors. This is a rare sport where we give the credit to the tools instead of the players. In almost any sport the person gets the credit. Is a fisherman great because of the pole he uses? Is a skier great because of the skis, or a golfer because of their clubs? Does a great violin make a great musician? Sure, good tools help, but in any endeavor it’s the operator skills that make the tools work, not the other way around. I can make great finds with countless detectors, and people make the mistake of thinking the detector I am using must be what is making it happen. The actuality is detector companies send me detectors to use because I can make even a mediocre machine look good. What is really needed is more focus on detecting skills, and less focus on detectors, to reach the top of the game in metal detecting, just like anything else.
    13 points
  45. More photos. 8 nuggets so far for a total of 1.5 g.
    13 points
  46. I decided to get the old map out and find some farm houses that have long since disappeared. Took a little while at each one to locate where the house was but I got a couple good finds. My first artillery eagle button and a sterling US Navy ring.
    13 points
  47. Well I can tell you that in my area there is at least 1 moron who leaves pits and never fills the holes they dig. For a long time I wondered who was doing it but found out for sure who it was. The guy lied about it, blaming it on some other random individual when it was he who was carrying a regular variety garden shovel and digging the holes that day! To see more idiots like that out and destroying grass giving us all a bad name is not something I would want. When you start talking about lower detector prices causing a flood of new people, I don't think they need to buy a Nokta to be an idiot. They have plenty of options available today already that are much cheaper. An idiot leaving craters around is an idiot, whether he/she is swinging a $50 detector or a $5,000 detector. The idea that expensive detectors can only be afforded by the "elite detector professionals" is also a bunch of garbage. Stupidity and crater diggers have no dollar value, they are found at every level!
    13 points
  48. I'm with you Steve, It's about the Gold and just having a spot you know you can find it. Keep the Relic's, lead mini balls, buttons, the Non-Gold coins, the bottles, and anything that is not solid gold. I do enjoy seeing silver but only because it's a sign to me Gold is near. If your finding gold everyone wants to be your hunting buddy, heck with that.. Nice hunting Gerry! Love the nuggets! No claims to being King here, Many Great hunters And Machines out there ! And this is,... what its all about..
    13 points
  49. I did some more testing of the Equinox 600 and the AT Max in my yard, local park and modified Monte's Nail Board. Right now, I'm 98% certain I'm keeping the Equinox 600 and selling the AT Max. Below are my results concerning my series of tests using my modified version of Monte's Nail Board. I'm going to briefly explain my set up, then provide my results. But TL;DR: the Equinox 600 handily beat the AT Max. My Monte's Nail Board is "special" because I have it set up where I will use a clad dime as the "high tone" target and it's on a plastic tube so the metal detector can be tested with the dime on the same plane as the nails, as well as about 2.5 inches below the nail. At the very bottom are some pics of the modified Monte Nail Board set up. Legend: Coin Position 1 (Up) = the dime is in the middle coin position, but the dime is on the same plane as the nails. Coin Position 1 (Down) = the dime is in the middle coin position, but the dime is below the plane (about 2.5 inches) the nails are on. Coin Position 2 (Up) = the dime is in the side coin position, but the dime is on the same the plane nails are on. Coin Position 2 (Down) = the dime is in the side coin position, but the dime is below the plane (about 2.5 inches) the nails are on. 4 = The metal detector gave a tone and/or VDI response that would definitely result in me digging the target. 3 = The metal detector gave a tone and/or VDI response that would likely result in me digging the target. 2 = The metal detector gave a tone and/or VDI response that would likely result in me NOT digging the target. 1 = The metal detector gave a tone and/or VDI response that would definitely result in me NOT digging the target. When tested, the AT Max was set up so I notched out everything below 65 (so I was in Custom mode), Iron Audio off and sensitivtiy at 2 (out of 8). I also ran the test in Zero mode, but the results were worse (1s all around). The AT Max was using the stock coil (8.5 x 11). Coin Position 1 (Up): Sweep 1: 2 Sweep 2: 1 Sweep 3: 1 Sweep 4: 1 Coin Position 1 (Down): Sweep 1: 1 Sweep 2: 1 Sweep 3: 1 Sweep 4: 1 Coin Position 2 (Up): Sweep 1: 1 Sweep 2: 1 Sweep 3: 1 Sweep 4: 1 Coin Position 2 (Down): Sweep 1: 1 Sweep 2: 1 Sweep 3: 1 Sweep 4: 1 When tested, the Equinox 600 was set up in Park 1 where everything was stock, except I adjusted F2 = 0. Sensitivity was at 10 (out of 25). The Equinox 600 was using the stock (11") coil. Coin Position 1 (Up): Sweep 1: 4 Sweep 2: 1 Sweep 3: 3 Sweep 4: 4 Coin Position 1 (Down): Sweep 1: 4 Sweep 2: 1 Sweep 3: 1 Sweep 4: 1 Coin Position 2 (Up): Sweep 1: 4 Sweep 2: 2 Sweep 3: 2 Sweep 4: 2 Coin Position 2 (Down): Sweep 1: 4 Sweep 2: 1 Sweep 3: 1 Sweep 4: 1 I also tested the Vanquish 340 (and the Fisher F2, but that scored 1s all around). The 340 was in Coin mode with sensitivity at 1 (out of 4). I was also using the V8 coil with it. Coin Position 1 (Up): Sweep 1: 4 Sweep 2: 3 Sweep 3: 3 Sweep 4: 3 Coin Position 1 (Down): Sweep 1: 1 Sweep 2: 1 Sweep 3: 1 Sweep 4: 1 Coin Position 2 (Up): Sweep 1: 1 Sweep 2: 1 Sweep 3: 2 Sweep 4: 1 Coin Position 2 (Down): Sweep 1: 1 Sweep 2: 1 Sweep 3: 1 Sweep 4: 1
    13 points
  50. Went up to the racetrack again yesterday, thought these finds deserve a post of their own. There is a small plot of land next to where the house stood. It had a barn and the cemetery behind it. It's about a half acre. Lots of corn stalks 😵 At first the going was kinda risky, the wind was blowing about 20 mph, big low off the coast. I had to search under trees in the background and these were falling everywhere. If any of you have ever been hit in the head by one of these Black Walnuts, you know what the fun part is. They were coming down like rain. I suppose I could have waited a few more days but hunting season starts soon. The trees are about 50' or more, and they get a bit of velocity. 😀 I really didn't expect to find much at all, a scout search last spring gave no indication there was anything good here, but I was determined to grid something out of it after my finds from previous days. This is another example of "persistence pays off". All of these relics are very old. A pistol ball, an as yet unidentified fired ~45 cal bullet (the sharp end is throwing me off). The first button says "Gilt Colour" and something else on the back and still has some thread. Second has a triangle on the front and possibly some other marks, and says "Plated" on the back. The third is my favorite, an ancient convex Tombac with some off-center engraving. It has a square shank boss on the back. By afternoon someone was shooting a handgun in my direction, must have fired about 100 rounds. I didn't hear any "snaps" so I presumed the shooter was on a lower elevation and hoped there was a backstop. 🙄 Guess I'm gonna have to get a boat horn. 😵 Another bit of excitement was coming across two of these "little" guys building webs across the corn stalks in front of me. The Yellow Garden Spider can grow to 1 1/2 inches in body length. They rarely bite but if they do you know it, those fangs flip out. I'm glad that metal detectors are out in front. 😀 I let them both carry on... 😬
    13 points
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