Jump to content

cjc

Member
  • Content Count

    140
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

255 Good

2 Followers

About cjc

  • Rank
    Copper Contributor

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location:
    Toronto Canada
  • Interests:
    Detectors, gold....that's it.
  • Gear Used:
    Macro Racer 2, Sovereign X2 , Excal 1000, Excal 11, Anchor Electronics Barracuda, (3) GQA2, , Whites Dual Field (2), Fisher CZ21, CZ5, CS6PI...CTX 3030, Nokta Impact, Kruzer, Eq 800 w/p TDI Pro...

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://clivesgoldpage.com/
  • Facebook
    clivesgoldpage

Recent Profile Visitors

2,191 profile views
  1. Willy I can see that you have a lot of knowledge of detector construction and performance. Thanks for your ongoing contributions to this discussion--really appreciate the learning. Good Luck Detecting, clive
  2. Well, Steve, Im working full time right now in response to the virus. Wish I had time to hunt more but have had it out a few times. I'm a ways off from the level of information density and value that I like my books to have. The prefab way in which some authors construct their books with the same pages being used from one to the next is definitely a road I don't plan to go down. My readers expect more. Certainly getting some good notes though. See a lot of potential in this machine wish I could get to some better sites to really see what it's got. I do like the stability and the depth of the All Metal mode. I also like the overall response --the speed and small gold sensitivity. Like any machine they key will be in finding where to best use it's strengths. Under normal circumstances this machine would have been on a plane with me within weeks of arriving but that will have to wait for now. Thanks for asking! cjc
  3. Got it thanks for the correction. Kind of why I call it 3 tone--it showed up second anyhow lol. Never been thrilled with the AM on the Anfibio either kind of flat for a machine with that kind of punch. AM is supposed to be you "bread and butter". clive
  4. A Few Notes on the Nokta / Makro Simplex I originally thought that the Notka / Makro Simplex + would be a good lightweight backup to take cycling or in my pack along the beach. It’s turned out to be a lot more. The Simplex is now my go-to park machine. I say this because if it’s excellent trash rejection and overall accuracy. This is a detector with very sophisticated electronics. When I take the Simplex + in at trash infested areas--I can tell by the audio what’s under the coil. Coins or other round targets give clean sharp sounds. Other misshapen and inconsistent objects like “can slaw” or twisted wire give broken tones and scattered meter readings. The meter itself is also very accurate--after several months I’m able to pick out clad quarters and our one and two dollar coins with ease. Targets that read “way up” on the scale--in the high 90’s tend to be iron. I can also hear the “width” of signal well--steering me off the big iron and other large junk. I can also tell a dime--by the size. This is hands down the best beginner machine I’ve used. Last week I dug a clad dime at over 10 inches. While this is not that deep by some standards--just how good of a signal it gave was a shock to me. Even if it was not waterproof, the Simplex would be a great value--but it is fully submersible with a set of optional underwater phones. Its always been my experience that you are much more likely to make big finds in the water--even at the very edge. I also like the quick, practical interface. I usually search in the new Park 2 Tone ID mode. This alerts me to coin-range targets “loud and clear.” From there I can check questionable targets in the high bias (greater iron rejection) “Field” mode with one press--or All Metal mode with two presses. These two quick tests--along with using the “cross-sweep” and pinpoint mode give a ton of target information. This is just a really well laid-out, well thought-out machine that will satisfy hunters at all levels. It also has a lot of nice small touches--built-in flash light, backlit controls and display, wireless audio, and a feature that lets you hear as much or as little iron as you want. While there aren't’ many great silver or relic sites near here, I’ve increased my clad coin find count a lot using this machine. Moreover---it’s a pleasure to use and I enjoy listening to how accurately it processes whats under the coil and brings up the best signal from among the junk. I’m still learning and need to get more familiarity with some of the middle ranges. I do know that the high 20’s are a good gold range. Another huge feature of the Simplex + is that the wireless phones can be paired with a Notka / Makro pinpointer so that as soon as you switch on to locate a target--the detector sound turns off and you get this big, clean headphone tone to locate your target with. This is something I’ve always loved about the Anfibio--great to see the same feature in an even more affordable detector. I take this machine to a park that has seen 40 years worth of detectors and never fail to come out with a surprising haul. The Simplex + has brought new life to every “worked out” site in my area with it’s accuracy and sharp performance. This detector has let me return to “hunting local”--and make good use to the limited time I have. I have been recommending this detector to anyone who asks about a good unit to learn their basics with. At the same time--this is a great performing machine for intermediate hunters--or a reliable backup for those at the top levels of the hobby. Just wish the entry level detectors were like this when I started! Good Luck Detecting! Clive James Clynick Toronto, Canada
  5. A Few Notes on the Nokta / Makro Simplex I originally thought that the Notka / Makro Simplex + would be a good lightweight backup to take cycling or in my pack along the beach. It’s turned out to be a lot more. The Simplex is now my go-to park machine. I say this because if it’s excellent trash rejection and overall accuracy. This is a detector with very sophisticated electronics. When I take the Simplex + in at trash infested areas--I can tell by the audio what’s under the coil. Coins or other round targets give clean sharp sounds. Other misshapen and inconsistent objects like “can slaw” or twisted wire give broken tones and scattered meter readings. The meter itself is also very accurate--after several months I’m able to pick out clad quarters and our one and two dollar coins with ease. Targets that read “way up” on the scale--in the high 90’s tend to be iron. I can also hear the “width” of signal well--steering me off the big iron and other large junk. I can also tell a dime--by the size. This is hands down the best beginner machine I’ve used. Last week I dug a clad dime at over 10 inches. While this is not that deep by some standards--just how good of a signal it gave was a shock to me. Even if it was not waterproof, the Simplex would be a great value--but it is fully submersible with a set of optional underwater phones. Its always been my experience that you are much more likely to make big finds in the water--even at the very edge. I also like the quick, practical interface. I usually search in the new Park 2 Tone ID mode. This alerts me to coin-range targets “loud and clear.” From there I can check questionable targets in the high bias (greater iron rejection) “Field” mode with one press--or All Metal mode with two presses. These two quick tests--along with using the “cross-sweep” and pinpoint mode give a ton of target information. This is just a really well laid-out, well thought-out machine that will satisfy hunters at all levels. It also has a lot of nice small touches--built-in flash light, backlit controls and display, wireless audio, and a feature that lets you hear as much or as little iron as you want. While there aren't’ many great silver or relic sites near here, I’ve increased my clad coin find count a lot using this machine. Moreover---it’s a pleasure to use and I enjoy listening to how accurately it processes whats under the coil and brings up the best signal from among the junk. I’m still learning and need to get more familiarity with some of the middle ranges. I do know that the high 20’s are a good gold range. Another huge feature of the Simplex + is that the wireless phones can be paired with a Notka / Makro pinpointer so that as soon as you switch on to locate a target--the detector sound turns off and you get this big, clean headphone tone to locate your target with. This is something I’ve always loved about the Anfibio--great to see the same feature in an even more affordable detector. I take this machine to a park that has seen 40 years worth of detectors and never fail to come out with a surprising haul. The Simplex + has brought new life to every “worked out” site in my area with it’s accuracy and sharp performance. This detector has let me return to “hunting local”--and make good use to the limited time I have. I have been recommending this detector to anyone who asks about a good unit to learn their basics with. At the same time--this is a great performing machine for intermediate hunters--or a reliable backup for those at the top levels of the hobby. Just wish the entry level detectors were like this when I started! Good Luck Detecting! Clive James Clynick Toronto, Canada
  6. It's a sad day when basic detector care (rinsing, cable care) have to be layed out for customers. Manufacturers shouldn't have to "idiot proof" their products. One things Jimmy Pugh (Anchor Electronics Barracuda) told me" "...your cables are like your veins". Very good advice. This sounds like a very exciting machine. cjc
  7. Just an afterthought--I have a beach that's full of this slag too. Run the F2 up at 8 or 9--it will knock out these complex alloys. This is a very valuable feature that no other detector has best I know. cjc
  8. I'll say this: for sure you have a very sensitive detector. Many are not used to this level of small object sensitivity and struggle to focus on worthwhile targets. I would suggest that you undertake some serious bench testing. This takes time. Get yourself a standard sized tester--a ring or coin and put it on an upside down cardboard box. Test with the coil at various distances. This "hand to ear to eye" recognition is a critical skill and no setting change will stand it for it. Use the cross-sweep to get a feel for how solid and consistent something is. With practice these micro conductors will become less of a problem. When you want tiny targets--instead of just reducing the detector's response--you will be able to be alerted to the best, most solid ones. Learn to correlate signal strength, target size, loudness, and the depth reading--this is where the information you want can be found. There aren't really any shortcuts. Too many on FB and some of the forums want to try and make a "science" of having no basic skills--almost random digging. It can't be done. Looking for "sets" of target characteristics in exactly this way is the key to becoming an accurate and effective hunter. Take your time and learn your basics--this kind of awareness will come. Walk first--it will make you a better runner down the line. Good Luck, clive
  9. These newest two updates add a lot to the Simplex's already great performance. The new Park 1 one mode was awesome--very clean audio that gave a nice centered high tone on coins. Kind of reminded me of the Anfibio in how it brought up the round, solid objects really well. Actually had to turn down the Gain but the machine was still getting nice depth. I was working with a pinpointer and used the Mute feature several times to prevent any sounding off. My favorite set of phones were actually too loud on the higher Volume settings settled on "H2". By checking my targets on the cross sweep and in pinpoint for size I was able to dig mostly coins including this '35 King George the 5th cent. This is an amazing detector--and not just "for the price." It has a lot of punch, great audio and the features to make for pro-level versatility. Can't wait to see how this machine does in the salt water. Great job, Notka Makro!
  10. ya those are unusual. I see Heineken as the "median" cap--lots of aluminum in them they are half ferrous and half non ferrous. When those alert you--you are being pretty thorough. cjc
  11. I see way too many new hunters who hope to find some gold but think it’s the first thing they are going to find..sorry bad news–its not In most conditions, random digging is not going to do much for you. While its good to dig a lot of targets, the key is to continually work on your selectivity. By all means the way to get used to the target sounds of your detector is to to dig but along with this learning over time it’s important to be able to recognize some various basic target types. In the picture we have a nice array: too big–(cigarette pack), elongated: (Allan keys, glasses arm and bobby pins). too small and weak: (some of the smaller foils at left),, alloys (caps). Not shown here are some iron targets–(bolts, that type of thing). With practice these are all recognizable targets–they have “problems” either on the meter or when checked on the cross sweep or in pinpoint. “There are also several “good” targets–a few coins, and some of the more solid foil pieces. While it might not be as exciting as getting out and digging–just getting a few of each target type and testing them on an upside down cardboard box can increase your accuracy a lot. While there are sites where “inclusive digging” is the way to go–remember–an exception does not make a rule. Learning how good targets respond is a more productive way to learn than “going begging” with weak, elongated or out-sized signals. The “iffy” ones can come later. clivesgoldpage.com
  12. Thanks for your great, thorough article, Steve. Really filled in a lot of gaps in my history files. This kind of theory is important to know so that people don't expect too much from any single platform. They all do different things well. Lets hope you are right about the do all" models to come. cjc
  13. Thanks Redneck. Turns out you DO know your....Sorry-- Ya those are great phones perfect impedance match--they make a great detector near perfect--especially in the iron way fewer spike digs. Glad you are enjoying the book. Kind Regards clive
  14. Just got a set of these shipped in 3 days from Hungary. Perfect impedance match for the N/M detectors--incredible sound. Very clean and sharp --brings my accuracy up a lot. They are so loud they need to be run at 8. I worked with the manufaturer to improve his strain relief system (see the Heyco)--very nice set of phones for these machines. cjc
  15. I think that what we are dealing with is not a lack of accuracy--but "ultra-accuracy" reading different degrees of "bleaching" in nickels, and not only the wide variety of caps present, but also the level of rusting out. This is why I've always advocated a broad based approach to ID-ing these types of targets--by signal type rather than just meter and tone. cjc
×
×
  • Create New...