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Clay Diggins

Critical Minerals Report & Map

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The USGS just released their latest Professional Paper 1802 Critical mineral resources of the United States–Economic and environmental geology and prospects for future supply.

This thing is a monster! 862 pages and a 170 Mb download.

That is a big download for a lot of people so we shrunk their bloated PDF down to 30 Mb. It's got all the stuff the bigger one does but the graphics are scaled down to web user size.
You can download the full 862 page report directly from Land Matters.

This huge report is fine in itself but to really understand what's in it we figured a map of all the locations would help.
You can load up the Critical Minerals interactive Map right in your browser and study it along with your book. We've added the mines of the world as well as some basic base layers so you can compare the report locations to known historical and current mines. We'll be adding more features to that map soon.

If you need to print out the book in it's original high resolution form you can find it at the USGS Publications Warehouse.

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