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  1. I already have a V440, GF 66 and a GM1000. I am getting too old to be digging all day and would rather walk in preference to digging. Thus I prefer sites where it is lesser known so it has not been worked to death. I don't dig beyond 6in and work on the principle that the old timers the old have missed the eluvial and alluvial that was lying just below the surface. Also the fact that not many have hunted there. Anyway that's my rationale for gentlemenly prospecting. After waffled on above what are your thoughts on the best detector that will find gold larger than 1 gm down to 6ins ie not interested in the tiny pieces .Also can find coins etc if possible. I am not interested in 2300,7000 etc as they are well outside my price range. If you have any suggestions I would appreciate it thanks.
  2. I'm starting up detecting again so I'm looking for opinions on a new machine. Money is an issue, but I know a descent machine will cost a little bit. So far I'm leaning towards a Fisher F22 or one of the Garret models. By all means, give me opinions on not just those mentioned, but any that would be good for someone not too far above beginner (have to learn everything again).
  3. Hello all, My name is Ron and I'm new to the forum and have been learning a lot from it's members and really appreciate all the time everyone puts into this forum, some really great information comes from this forum. I'm in the market for an upgrade from my current detectors and am trying to decide on which would be the best detector for the worst case scenario as I have currently been detecting in the Siskiyou's serpentine gold belt (pretty much to hot for VLF's) and this gold belt also contains a very large amount of trash. The Equinox 800, Gold Bug 2, Garrett AT Gold have not been able to handle the mineralization of this ground very well. I have not tried any other VLF’s here though. I usually rely on my Minelab Pulse Induction unit in this ground and use the iron disc. to save probably 75% of my time from digging unnecessary holes. I'm still interested in owing a top of the line VLF due to I detect mine dumps in the backcountry of Idaho, Nevada, and eastern Oregon where the trash is less abundant and the ground is not so mineralized even though it is usually steep and rugged (great VLF areas). After reading several posts on this forum I have narrowed my research of VLF metal detectors to the Equinox 800, Gold Monster, X-tera 705 Gold Pack, Nokta/Makro Gold Kruzer or AU Gold Finder, White's 24K or MXT, or a second back-up Gold Bug 2. I am really looking for the machine that can handle the hottest ground and has the sharpest sound on small and deep gold. Although no detector is a do it all machine I'm hoping the one that can handle the hot ground the best should be able to excel with better iron/disc. and target separation regardless of it being a multi-purpose detector or gold only detector, my assumption only. Does the frequency of detectors change their ability to handle hot ground like Australia. Has anyone tried these detectors in highly minenalized ground with any good results? For Pulse Induction I'm narrowing my research to the GPX 6000 and/or GPZ 7000 both non disc. units for a great option for Idaho, eastern Oregon, and Nevada were there is less lead and iron trash present. For these Siskiyou's trash sites I'm looking at the GP/GPX series with iron/disc. Garrett ATX, Fisher Impulse Gold (has anyone been able to separate out lead and iron trash with the Fisher limited AQ Impulse version and still find small and deep gold)? Has anyone got a good grasp on these machines being affective in iron and lead infested areas? Thank You for your time. Ron
  4. Hi all. I've been detecting for two years, this actually being the start of my third season. Started with (and still have) a Fisher F44. I liked it just fine, but mere weeks later I started seeing and reading the hype around the Equinox 800, so I ordered one (took three months to get it because they were still scarce at the time). Since I got the Nox the F44 hasn't left home. I have probably 150 hours in on the Nox and I am getting to know it more and more every time out, and I am impressed with its capabilities compared to my only other experience, the F44. Due to life circumstances and annoying loved ones, I didn't get to hunt as much last summer as I'd have liked, but I am hitting it much harder this year and intend that to continue. My problem is, I'm always in favor of having more options. I have about 20 fishing rods when three or four would do (and since I started metal detecting, fishing has gone by the wayside). I have two chain saws when one would do. I have about 15 crescent wrenches when three would be plenty. (Some of them are dramatic black in color, some of them have a rubber hand grip - ooooh!) That's just how I'm wired. My mind keeps wandering to the idea of upgrading from the Nox and getting another detector, for variety in my detecting experience and expanding my experience in the hobby if nothing else, and I want anything I buy to be an upgrade, not a lateral move. More depth, better target ID, more bells and whistles (I love tech and "tinkering and tweaking"), a 3-D color rendering of the object being detected, a blonde in a neon pink bikini included with purchase to hold my "digging tool". You know, an upgrade. 🙂 I've done lots of reading and everything leads me to the idea that I can't really do better than the Nox unless I get into the $4-5000 range, which is too rich for my blood. I have the budget for a CTX 3030 and have almost pulled the trigger on one a couple of times, but that doesn't seem like that much of an upgrade. Possibly better or more precise target ID in most conditions, and a wider array of settings and things to play with. The Deus sounds like a nice machine, but comparisons say the Nox is pretty much its equal and it seems like a Deus would be a lateral move. I detect in parks, woods, yards, old home sites, playgrounds, fields that show old building sites on maps, and I'm not really interested in getting wet at all. I live in Wisconsin, so salt water isn't a concern. I'm hunting for pretty much anything I find that's interesting to me. Coins (I'm still new enough to detecting that a half-dozen clad pennies is a good day to me), relics, jewelry, an old Coca-cola can, or anything that 'trips my trigger' when it comes out of the ground. Can tabs don't trip my trigger, even if they are 45 years old and still shiny. You guys on this forum have so much experience and knowledge that it makes my jaw drop quite often, so I'm asking for advice. I'm not worthy of shining most of your shoes, so I throw myself on your mercy and wisdom. Should I just stay with my Nox, put a few hundred more hours on it and be satisfied with my first-world problems? Maybe wait a year or two or five and see what earth-shattering new stuff may come out? Or is there a machine out there now that would satisfy my wanderlust for a few years and be an upgrade to the Nox, but not go much beyond that CTX price tag? If I do buy something as pricey as a CTX, that would be the last investment I would want to make for at least five or so years, so might it be better to hold off for now due to any new, awesome technology on the near horizon? Thanks for reading and thanks for any advice you can give, I really appreciate your time.
  5. Hello all, I recently saw someone state that they didn't fully understand why they sometimes get the urge to buy a certain detector! And for one reason or another, fail to pull the trigger, or asking the question of why not! I, like many here, have questioned why i would want to purchase; and have purchased, what would "technically" be an "inferior" detector! If there is such a thing; they all find stuff!! I think the reason's are as numerous as one can imagine! So i won't bore everyone with what i think their reasons are! I can only speak for myself! Probably my number one driving factor are places like this forum, and other sources for research! Once you really start to get the "bug" for detecting, you begin to understand that it can go beyond just finding treasures! In fact, my reading, and quest for information, far exceeds my actual detecting hours! Of course, there are also "real life" reasons that prevent me from getting out there as often as i would like! But instead of that being a negative; and me being bitter about it! I funnel that energy into trying to soak up more knowledge to make my actual detecting hours more productive! Many here will understand this! So, for those thay are unclear what that has to do with buying older, or less advanced detectors, i will explain! Like many, i detected a few years when i was young! Stopped for a career, and family; among other reasons! And got back to it, a few years before my retirement five years ago! Not being involved for all those years, i went with a new detector; among others i researched at the time! Now fast forward to today! I'm much more knowledgeable than seven years ago; detecting and theory wise, but have barely scratched the surface! I own several detectors for various functions! Some overlapping each other a bit in operation! A few others are just for fun, or for something i feel i missed, in my absent years! Other's were too good a deal to pass up! And I could get a good return for, if i chose to! So, to summarize! In my opinion, the longer your in it, the wider range of technology, legends, varations, etc... you are likely to buy, and try, for no very practical reason! Cost not withstanding; as you advance in this hobby! Or as some jokingly refer to it as a "sickness ", or "obsession "! 🤩 👍👍
  6. I'm looking to buy my first detector this year, specifically for nugget hunting. After lots of research I'm leaning towards the SDC 2300, but wanted to see if you have other suggestions based on my terrain/conditions. We don't have much public land for detecting because the national forests and state parks don't allow it. But I have access to a private 10 acre property with a creek flowing through it. There was allegedly an old gold mine that was buried decades ago in a neighbouring property, so hopefully it is a good place to work. The ground is covered in lots of organic matter sitting on top of soil heavy in granite and red clay. The creek contains a wide variety of minerals specimens and a good amount of magnetite. So it looks like I'll need to focus on PI machines. Here are my main questions. Will my time be better spent in the creek where the gravels and rocks are exposed, or should I also focus efforts in the higher areas covered in humus? Should I wait for the Fisher Impulse Gold to come out (and prove itself with users) before dropping a few grand on older technology? Does anyone recommend the Garret ATX or any other detector over the SDC 2300 for the area and conditions I'm dealing with?
  7. Hello everyone! My name is Jesse, and I dig trash on the beaches of Santa Cruz, California with my White's TDI BeachHunter. Tent Stakes, Bottle caps, clad, you name it. Occasional gold (around an ounce in the last year), but wayyyyy too much garbage for the time spent out there. No, more like the right amount of garbage dug on a trashy beach with a PI with no discrimination settings LOL. I love this machine. It's stable, reliable, punches very deep, and was a great first "real" detector. The weight sucks (though it can be hip mounted, but I found myself getting tangled in the wired in that configuration), and the shaft sucks too. I have saved some money, and am planning to shoot for the moon. I want the best beach detector out there, VLF, PI, or otherwise, that will help me dig 99% less garbage, and still punch deep and be fun to swing. So far, considering a CTX 3030 or Equinox 800. Big coil for either. Reading the forum for a few months, following developments, it seems that the metal detector market moves about as slowly as the "games in development" market. I may be outing myself as a Zoomer here but waiting for these new machines really brings me back to waiting for games to go from beta to 1.0. Anyways I'll be in possession of my next detector for the foreseeable future, and am having a hard time deciding what choice to make. Do I get the 9 year old, 50 lb dinosaur with *slightly better VDI depth on higher conductors that costs almost double what a proper Nox setup would cost (with accessories), or do I get the Nox? Which feels just past its prime, with direct replacements probably coming out soon? Do I wait for these detectors that exist only in the imagination? The new fisher PI, possible CTX replacement? I have a nice pile of coin after selling some finds and other detectors and would really like to make this purchase count, any input is appreciated!:) -TENT SPIKE DIGGER
  8. I'm looking to get a dedicated machine just for hunting gold chains and earrings on some fresh water beach sites while the lake level is down drastically. I'm thinking maybe a Gold monster 1000 or perhaps a GB2. I like the idea of having 2 coils with the Minelab and the Auto ground balance, any suggestions????
  9. We all have different styles of gold nugget shooting and across this globe are so many varying terrains to chase nuggets. Our skills and years at it vary and on this fine forum, it could just as easily be the eager beaver newer member who's grateful for their 1 and only nugget, as it could be a salty savvy veteran with a lifetime of Thankful gold finds. And yet many of us have a certain detector that meant so much to our pursuit of heavy metal. What model of gold detector are you most thankful for and why? For me, it's the Fisher Gold Bug-2 as it was the 1st gold detector we (detector & I) became 1. It was the machine that kept gold coming in and eventually lead me to the Pulse Induction powers/depths beyond. It's not my favorite to swing today (not even top 3), but I have to give credit when due and the GB-2 is the gold detector I am most thankful for. I look forward to hearing your Thankful gold detector comments.
  10. I consider myself freshwater gold jewelry hunter with a focus on gold chains. I have used Tesoro Stingray II models for the past 20 something years and have decided to purchase either an Equinox 800, a Makro Gold Kruzer, or maybe one of the Multi's. I prefer the first 2 models because of their high frequencies but not having used either, I don't know if 40 or 61 khz. offer any significant advantages over a machine running in the 12-20 khz. range. I would be interested in hearing your thoughts on the matter. I tend to keep my detectors for a while so reliability/durability is somewhat of a consideration. If you have any other waterproof detector considerations you'd like to suggest feel free. Thank you, auBurkey
  11. Hello everyone, I have been out of the hobby for 15 years or so. I have a Minelab XS and was wondering what unit I should buy as an upgrade to this machine.. I mainly search for relics and coins.. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.. Oh, I do some beach searching but very little.. Most of my searching is in the hills of Georgia.. Thank you, Tim
  12. This forum allows threads to be tagged as a way to group and find similar threads cross multiple forums. Since the forum started, there have been numerous threads by people asking what the "best detector" is for various situations. Yet there was no tag linking all these opinions together. So I created the new "best detector" tag for these threads, hunted them down, and tagged them. All told we ended up with over four pages of links to these types of threads. There is lots of good info that gets brought up in these threads, so check it out..... best detector After this thread runs out of steam I will pin it to the top so new people will be able to see all that info before asking their own version of the question.
  13. I have been around this hobby for over 35 years and went from the guy that had no idea what ground balance or gain meant to where I am today. It has taken thousands of hours of research and time, putting good detecting habits into practice. I, myself, have been very fortunate to be around some of the best diggers that have ever held a metal detector in their hands. If anyone ever thinks they are the best and they can’t get any better or learn more about what we do, then they are sadly mistaken. To this day I continue to learn every time I turn on and start swinging. Being associated with these guys for the last several years has really given me an insight that very few people will ever have. The team of diggers I work with are some of the best and most successful group you will ever find. Our fearless leader keeps us up to date on new machines and technology to keep us at a level we have attained. Now, how do you become the best detectorist you can be? First of all you must have an open mind and be willing to listen to the right people for instruction. In the past, I have been a involved in both Archery and Bowling to high degree. Those 2 sports taught me a very valuable lesson, if you want to be the best you can be, then learn from the best, someone that is very successful. I spent a lot of money buying the wrong stuff by listening to the “expert” that didn’t have a clue. I have learned how to do research from whom to seek advice. I run into people all the time that are wanting to get better, but they listen to people that have a good line but, don’t have the success to back up their claims. It sometimes is hard to get rid of bad habits, whether it is in your swing or the way you do research. YouTube is nice and there are some good videos and knowledge to be found on the site. However, there is also a lot of wanting to be people giving some not so good advice. It’s important that you as a viewer know the difference. You ask how do I know, again look at what they have found. A few old coins or a couple of gold nuggets doesn’t mean they have the knowledge you seek. Another thing is don’t keep changing the settings on your machine because this guy says it is the best way to do it. Learn your machine from testing buried targets to find out what works to get the best results in your area. There are no magic setting, there is however very good setting to start and work with to get your best performance. You will never be good if you are always changing your detector from this guys or to the next video guy that knows it all. YOU must learn how your machine works and when you need to change settings. Learn the sounds, do not depend on the ID’S # on when to dig. They are for a reference point to what might be the target. It takes years of dedication to understand this hobby. Now let’s talk about the detector that you have or want to get. I get asked all the time WHAT IS THE BEST MACHINE? The simple answer is “none” are the best at every task. And beyond that is what task are you wanting to use the detector. How about the selection of coils (not loops or heads) is compatible with a metal detector. What is the cost of the metal detector and the selection of coils you are going to need for your task? Not everyone can afford the most expensive detector on the market. But, if goal is to be the best nugget hunter you can be and are committed to that end, then, YES the Minelab GPZ-7000 is a machine you would definitely want to consider for Gold Nugget Hunting. To be honest, I am a bit prejudice about the brands of detectors I use so keep that in mind, but I use the one’s I use because they are the machines that I feel are the best for me and the tasks I want use them. That being said, here is what I have for my needs: GPZ-7000 GPX-5000 CTX-3030 FISHER GOLD BUG-2 XP DEUS These are not the only machines but they are my choice, do your research to find yours. THIS IS MY OPINION: Yes, I put in thousands of hours swinging and learning and have found over a thousand gold nuggets and some nice coins and relics. Why did I pick those machines? It is simple for me. When it comes to finding Gold Nuggets, Minelab is unsurpassed for depth on larger nuggets. That is why I have the GPZ-7000 and the GPX- 5000. Those two machines are similar but not the same. There are times when the GPX-5000 will outshine the GPZ-7000 and so that is the one bring out of the truck. If you are hunting nuggets in an area that has had a lot of miners camping and leaving iron items and trash behind, then discrimination may be needed and the GPX-5000 is the detector I want to use. When hunting in the Nevada desert where ferrous items are limited and nuggets of all sizes are possible to be found then the GPZ-7000 is my first choice. I have owned all the Minelab series from the GP 3500 up to the GPZ-7000. The GP series detectors have been the best gold finding detectors of their time. I have been fortune enough to find enough gold to justify the investment and I believe if you have the proper tools to get the job done correctly your chances of success becomes greater. The Fisher Gold Bug-2 is designed to find smaller and shallower gold and mean from fly *#*# to nice gold in the mineralized shallow ground. It is hard to beat the Gold Bug-2 when it comes to finding really small gold, but the Newer Minelab SDC-2300 comes very close but doesn’t have iron discrimination if that is needed. The last detector I use for hunting gold is the XP Deus. Now where would I use a multi purpose coin, relic and gold machine, in tailing piles looking for specimen gold. Again, these are my choices and for tailing piles The XP Deus is not the only detector that is good for the job, the Minelab X-terra 705 is the choice for a couple of the successful team members. When it comes to coin and relic hunting the Minelab CTX-3030 is what I find works best for me. One of the reasons I like this machine because it is waterproof. If you choose to hit the lake or beach you don’t have to worry about getting it wet and it works outstanding in the water while jewelry hunting. It has a good selection of coils to cover your hunting needs. In high iron areas I use the 6 inch coil and if the area it is a more open and uncluttered spot with deep coins the 17 inch monster coil would be the choice. The Stock coil works great for all around detecting conditions. The CTX-3030 or Minelab’s SDC-2300 are some of the best in water looking for those platinum, gold and silver rings. Again, there are other choices, but the CTX has it all and it covers most all of my coil and relic hunting needs. The XP Deus however, is a good choice with very heavy iron where the coins are close to the ferrous objects. I have paid for the XP Deus in a couple spots, finding some very nice targets lying too close to iron that the CTX was unable to find. I always use both units when I am in an area where old goodies are coming out of the ground. Back to how to become the best you can be. It takes hours and hours of using the correct techniques to become consistent in producing good finds. But just knowing your detector and technique is not enough by any means! The first part of becoming successful is doing the research to get you to a good spot. You can’t just always follow your buddies to get you to a good area. If they have been there, then you are looking for the left overs. It is fairly easy to find the cream in a spot, but to find what is below the cream and mixed in with the ferrous targets, or just plain DEEP TARGETS is what we are trying to do. You must put in the time to be successful. Wanting to find older coins and relics, then you have to be at a site that can hold those old items. The local city park is probably not your best choice but can be a very good place to practice honing your skills. The same holds true for a school yard. Lots of targets to get in some practice. With all the junk targets you can perfect your swing speed, coil control and keeping your coil level to the ground all the way through your swing. Learn how to separate targets and look for the deep ones, not the easy ones in the top 4 or 5 inches. Pass those up and leave those for later, but instead listen for the faint deep signals. The deep signals should be the better coins and relics. Look at the ground to see if has been turned over or fill has been added. While driving around look for old trees or stumps that have been there for years. Watch for older homes, especially ones that have bad lawn care. It can increase your chance to detect. Empty lots where old homes once stood. Look for foundations in those lots along with colored glass and trash from days gone by. Research at city hall or the library from where old roads or buildings once stood. Get photos from the era of when the community or mining camp was first started. Look at areas that didn’t have electricity back in the day, especially mine sites. Look for old maps of towns, forts or mining camps that are not on today's maps. The internet is a great source of information, but books and maps are usually the best way to go. As my detecting partner has told countless people, you will spend hundreds and even thousands of dollars buying that perfect detector, but you won’t spend a $100 a year buying research material to get you to those spots no one else finds. They are still out there. Research is all part of learning how to become successful. Coils are always a hot topic. What coil do I need? Well, you need the one designed to do the task you are attempting. If you are looking for shallow small targets, then a huge coil is not a good choice. Same way if you are looking for deep targets a small coil is not correct choice. Are you going to use discrimination, if so, you will need a DD coil. If you are after depth and sensitivity the mono coil is what you will want because they are more sensitive than their DD partners. There is also concentric coils on our coin and relic machines. You need to match the right coil to the task at hand. Smaller coils are designed to find smaller shallow targets. Big coils are made to go deep looking for that Lunker or deep coin, but if there is a small target at depth the big coil will most likely not see it and the small coil can’t see that deep so what does that mean. You simply can’t get them all unless you are scraping off a few inches at a time down to bedrock but we do try. Again, do some testing, if you are a nugget hunter then buy yourself some lead (Bird shot and fishing weights) in different sizes and put them in the ground at different depths and TEST!!! Coin hunters bury those coins in the ground so you can barely hear them. That serves two purposed, practice on faint targets and the opportunity to try different modes and setting to see what works in real life. Air tests are ok, but the mineralization and wetness in the ground tell the real story. That way you know what works and what doesn’t. That gives you the confidence and so you will not have to wonder if your machine and coil combination is correct. You will know! Confidence is a good thing. That is how we all have learned, practice practice practice…. You don’t have to be in the gold fields or a ghost town to become better on your detector. Instead of sitting on your couch go outside and put in some time learning about to make the machine and you work together to be successful. You might be surprised about how you want to get out there and find the get swinging after honing your skill level. If you have a family, what a way to spend some quality time together. And mom and dad you know the kids are going to get better than you. In conclusion, you want to be really good or just so so, the choice is yours. Everyone doesn’t want to be a Pro but if you do, it requires time, energy, investment and a lot of hours swing an digging. Remember, if you want to be the best then learn what you can from the successful hunter. Detector classes give you a huge leap forward to becoming successful. The final word is something I did hear on a video from a fellow digger: “Look of a reason to dig not for an excuse not to dig” Thanks for your time, Rye Patch Ron PS: Always fill in your holes, ask permission and leave it as good or better than before you dug.
  14. Hi people! I bought a new house recently, and have found a few old medical needles in the backyard. I want to sweep the entire yard before I start gardening. I want to know the cheapest detector I can use that will find me needles. Totally new to this whole thing, so any advice is greatly appreciated! -Grobs
  15. I know just about any machine can be used for coin shooting. However sometimes one unit is better than another. So I have been kind of thinking, maybe I am thinking a little too much but I wanted to see what some of you use primarily for a coin shooting only metal detector??
  16. Hello all. I have done a small amount of detecting years ago with a Whites detector (don't remember the model) and really enjoyed it. I search mostly on Iowa farmland that I own where old homesteads were. Sold detector several years ago but want to get back into the hobby. I would like to find coins, jewelry (not really any gold laying around here except corn!!) and such. Looking to spend around $1000 for equipment. Been researching some companies and Minelab looks like it has good detectors but never used one. Would appreciate any advice on what equipment would be appropriate of this type of detecting. Its not so much about the finding for me, its getting outdoors and the solitude of detecting. Finding is definitely a plus. I sure do dig up a lot of old rifle casings!! Would be nice if detector could differentiate these brass casings from other metals. Thanks Mike
  17. So, I'm going to get another pinpointer for a backup, and would like something to compliment (or replace) my Garrett Pro-pointer AT. I've heard good things about the Teknetics Tek-Point , and the Fisher F-Pulse, which I believe are essentially the same product. Anyone have any other suggestions?
  18. I've been updating this guide for almost twenty years now. It started back when there was little to offer in way of objective opinions on gold nugget detectors. That's not so much this case these days, but this is still the most comprehensive roundup available, along with some admittedly personal opinions about the models. These days we honestly have almost too many options, which can be confusing for beginners. So a few years ago I added my own short list of three models I recommend as safe picks for anyone around the world. The list was updated mainly to change my notes on the various Fisher 19 kHz models, where oddities in the First Texas marketing have now left the Gold Bug models high and dry as other FT 19 kHz models are available with better prices. I added warnings that the Minelab X-Terra 705 and GPX 4500 are in the process of being closed out and discontinued. Also added a big warning up front about counterfeit detectors - very common now in the nugget detector world. See the full guide here
  19. Hi everyone, first post. I'm currently new to metal detecting and I am using a loaned Whites 6000b coinmaster. I haven't dug anything but junk so far but I'm considering buying my first detector. My coworker has a Minelab CTX 3030 and I don't imagine I'll buy something that expensive as a beginner. I was looking at the Minelab Vanquish 540 or the Garrett Ace 400. I know very little about the different detectors but not looking to spend over $500 on my first. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
  20. Hello, So I am a beginner and amateur, but interested in finding gold as well as old coins, old bullets from muskets etc, relics, etc with a metal detector in Sweden. I have many thoughts about this, which I hope you can help me with, so I would be very grateful. I list my thoughts and questions below. 1. I was thinking about hearing what you think about the possibility of finding natural gold (gold grains, etc.) in Sweden in, for example, streams, etc., with a metal detector adapted to search for and find small gold grains? I found a website that has an article on it: http://www.detektorist.se/metalldetektor-guld/ If I understand them correctly, they mean: - The gold you find in Sweden unlike, for example, the USA and other countries (where you can often find the whole gold nuggets, unlike in Sweden where you find mostly small gold grains if you are lucky?) Is too small for a metal detector to find or almost impossible. It needs to be at least 3 milimeters for a metal detector to found it and may only be a few cm below the ground. - And that gold is not flattened in Sweden, which makes it even more difficult to find. - That gold is most often found in mineralized soil, which makes it difficult for the metal detector to get real signals, distinguish gold from other metal, etc. With that in mind, do you think it's worth it? Or waste of money? Or do you think it is wasteful and almost impossible to find gold in Sweden with a metal detector even if it is adapted for it? I am also interested as I said to find old coins etc. Should I put down the idea of finding naturally gold in Sweden, and buy a cheaper but good detector that is more focused on old coins, old bullets from muskets etc, than one that is most focus on finding natural gold? 2. Here I can buy in Sweden, "Professional metal detectors - metal seekers for prospectors looking for gold and minerals": https://www.guldstrom.se/sv/guld-mineralletning The metal detectors for seeking gold is: - Minelab Equinox 800 - Minelab Gold Monster 1000 - Minelab GPX 4500 - Minelab SCD 2300 Guld detektor - Garrett ATX - Minelab X-Terra 705 - XP ORX metalldetektor - Gold Rush tour 2020 Australia - Minelab GPZ 7000 Gold detector - Minelab GPX 5000 - Fisher Gold Bug 2 - Garrett AT Gold Would you recommend any of these? 3. I did send the swedish company an email and they answered: "Without a doubt, the best detector right now is the Minelab Gold Monster 1000 so this is the one to look for if you want to look for gold in Sweden. It also manages to find mineralized stones and it can differentiate between mineralized stones and solid metal. It is also excellent for exploring in streams and streams and the search coil is waterproof so it works great. The GM 1000 automatically adjusts itself so there are no knobs or buttons to turn on but just "whip and drive". You can find a really small gold grain -1mm in about 5 cm A larger gold grain of 3mm can be found in 10 cm A large gold grain of 4mm can be found in about 15 cm" If it is true on detektoristen.se that a gold grain must be 3 mm in Sweden, then the Minelab Gold Monster 1000 finds a gold grain of 1mm of 5 cm, 3 mm of 10 cm etc., so it does not seem to be a problem? In addition, it seems to be adapted to find gold in mineralized soil. So do you think it can work well to find gold in Sweden with a metal detector like Minelab Gold Monster 1000, or what do you think? Thank you very much.
  21. I'm pretty new to the detecting scene, and am having a great deal of fun so far. I have some friends that would like to participate, but they can't really justify buying one, so I was thinking I would get a second detector, so they could join in on the fun. I don't want to spend a lot of money, but still want something that has reasonable capabilities, and could serve as a fun backup machine to my Equinox 800. I've been looking at the Nokta Makro Simplex+. It's within my price point, and seems to be well liked. Suggestions? Alternatives?
  22. Hi All, I live in Chicago suburbs, am quite new to the hobby, about to buy my first detector. I did some research and have a few final questions I was hoping you could help me with: 1. Should I buy Minelab Vanquish 340 or Fisher F22, or do you have a strong suggestion for another model? (Honestly, I'm new to this, I'd like to find gold and historical relics but live in the semi-suburbs and worry about excessive anti-detecting regulations and hostile people) 2. Pinpointer: are they all the same, or should I stick to top brands like Garret, Mr. Otel or Minelab, even though they are 5x more expensive than copycats on Amazon? 3. I have a degree in anthropology (though I work in a quite different business field). Does metal detecting lead one to archaeology or numismatics necessarily? Does numismatics help with metal detecting?... Thanks so much for your insights. Tony
  23. What do you think? Here are my top three contenders. Garrett Ace Apex $425 Minelab Vanquish 540 $369 Nokta/Makro Simplex+ $254
  24. Im looking to get my first metal detector and will be using mostly at the beaches here in South Florida. I'll occasionally use use it more inland so would like it to be versatile. Also, wouldnt mind if it waterproof in case it gets wet at the beach. My budget is up to $1000. Can anyone recommend something that will work for me?
  25. Hi all! I'm looking for suggestions for a first purchase metal detector for using in the sierra/reno area. I'm thinking the vanquish 540, the simplex+ or multi kruzer. I can't really afford an equinox. Any suggestions, thoughts? Thank you for your help.
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