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  1. Only a matter of time before these start to ship out in Australia. Full credit to Garrett for doing a better job in marketing and sales, they are moving fast. Now available for sale in Australia.
  2. We've been in a bit of a Covid lock-down recently and during that time my Garrett 24k arrived so I wasn't able to use it in the gold fields straight away, it was quite painful to look at it knowing I can't go and use it, fortunately we came out of our lock-down and as took off for a prospect with the 24k as soon as I could. I ordered a White's 6" concentric coil for it to tie me over until Garrett and with any luck Nel come out with other coils for it, I hope they continue with the 6" Concentric as I'll buy a Garrett 6" Concentric as soon as they release it. It's a remarkably sensitive coil, I expected it to be less sensitive than it is as it's quite big however it surprised me and matches or exceeds smaller coils on other high frequency gold detectors. I've always been happy with Garrett coil quality so upgrading the Whites to a Garrett would be worthwhile I think. In saying that, neither the 10x6" Garrett coil or the Whites 6" coil were at all bump sensitive, not one bump noise the entire day. I'm so used to coil bump sensitivity from the Equinox and Gold Monster it was a rather pleasurable experience being able to scrub the coil on the ground like mad and bump it around not setting off the detector, giving me a distinct advantage over using bump sensitive coils. I started the day using the 10x6" Coil as I wanted to see how it goes and I was going back to a spot I'd found a fair few grams of gold in the past, about 30 or more nuggets using the scrape and detect method taking off layers of soil at a time and detecting it. The initial nugget which was just under half a gram and a fair few more were found using my GPZ including a 4.2 gram nugget and then I brought in the Equinox with 6" coil to clean up as a majority of the nuggets were very small and the VLF's tend to do better cleaning up these very small nuggets. I'd even gone over this little scrape and detect area with the Gold Bug 2 however it was a bit of a nightmare as the area is absolutely full of hot rocks and the Gold Bug 2 in heavy hot rocks isn't a good detector in my opinion, it's too busy making it's response noise to the hot rocks to worry about the bits of gold next to the hot rocks so you miss nuggets if they're near hot rocks. The problem is this spot is loaded with hot rocks all through the soil of various shapes and sizes mostly a green type of schist that is all crumbly and broken up and detectors love to sound off on it. It's likely there from the old timers, it's basically some old workings where the old timers left their rock pile in a little gully, and right on the lower downhill side of the rock pile was my little scrape and detect patch. Even the GPZ struggled with all of the hot rocks so I was quite pleased how the 24k was coping with them, sure it was sounding off on some of them too but it wasn't too troublesome and seemed to ignore the little broken up bits and very usable. I ran the 24k with the sensitivity maxed out, Sat on the middle setting and audio on Boost 2. The ground balance was quick and easy then I switched into the Locked balance mode. If the broken up schist bits of hot rock were too severe I left it in tracking which helped to knock them out. I gave the 6" Concentric coil a quick try and it struggled more with the hot rocks and i didn't want to lower my sensitivity down so I reverted back to the DD which appeared to handle them better and is still remarkably sensitive. So I just started scraping back layers and detecting taking about 2 inches off at a time knowing the gold here is likely going to be very small and it will be stuff I've missed in the past as I've scraped this spot out before and back filled it so I was essentially checking the same soil all over again for anything I missed. I had high hopes I had missed some as all it would take is a small hot rock to be sitting on top of the bit of gold the previous time and I'd likely miss it or just the bit of gold on it's side being a very thin one or any number of reasons, even just at a depth too deep for the size of gold with the detector I was using. It wasn't long and I had my first piece. Quite a decent size one too, I was baffled at the time why I'd missed this one in the past. The 24k had now found it's first gold, highly likely the first piece of gold found in New Zealand with the Garrett 24k, a badge I'll wear proudly. 🙂 Next up was a reasonably faint but very repeatable signal with no target ID showing, I delicately used my scoop to scrape soil away knowing this was likely a very small bit of gold and it sure was... my smallest bit of the day too and surprised I managed to find it with the 10x6" coil, I don't recall ever finding a bit this small using the 10x5" type size on other detectors. Can you spot it? 🙂 There it is! 0.007 of a gram, not bad for the 10x6" coil, especially in this hot rock infested ground. I always check targets in case they're odd little bits of metal with my pick magnet, and you'll see it was quick to build up black sand, this soil has plenty of it in it. I kept scraping down layers and found another. Quite small too... but a bit more meat on it than the previous one 🙂 I'd had enough of the scrape and detect spot by now and wanted to go explore a bit to see how the 24k performed for general detecting so I walked for about 10 minutes to another spot I'd found some gold in the past and detected for about an hour digging plenty of shotgun pellets, completely normal in this area as there is a rabbit plague that causes countless thousands of shotgun pellets to be distributed all over the place for me to clean up 🙂 I didn't have high hopes as myself and a friend (JW) have absolutely thrashed this area but it's always possible to miss gold when there is so many pellets. We generally scrape a few times and if the signal persists dig it, if it moves after the first scrapes ignore it thinking it's very likely a pellet. A few pictures of the sort of terrain I was detecting. My batteries went down to 2 bars quite quickly, within an hour. I assume as they're rechargeable and run at 1.2 volts instead of 1.5 volts for standard AA's but it stayed at the two bars for the entire day so still plenty of life left in them yet by the looks of it. Pretty wild rocky terrain and only really suitable for smaller coils. The GPZ with it's stock coil is terrible here, the smaller the coil the better in general. I did manage to find a piece though, after a lot of pellet digs 🙂 Not a bad size bit for the area too I now decided I'd put the Whites 6" Concentric coil on and give it another go as this area doesn't have near as many hot rocks as my scrape and detect spot. I found a bit of raised bedrock and had a signal that persisted down into the schist. At this point it almost had to be gold so I started filming. And it was gold 🙂 I had to break up the schist to get it out. A nice little piece too, a roundish flat one. This area has plenty of black sand too, this was my pick after checking that bedrock in case it was a steel shotgun pellet. It was getting near time to go get some dinner and I was pretty satisfied to even get one nugget in this area but I kept going a little while longer and it paid off. I like the bulls eye sight on the 6" coil, it really is the hot spot too, great for pinpointing. I had a signal that persisted down into the gravels on the bedrock. And got this one! It's hard to tell the depth in the photo but it was a reasonable depth. A few inches anyway. And that was it for the day, I was starving! So, do I like the 24K? You're damn right I do, it certainly exceeded my expectations and will now be my primary VLF gold detector replacing my Equinox which replaced my Gold Monster, and the Gold Bug 2 was just not for me, I didn't gel with it at all especially with the masking from hot rocks. I look forward to getting more coils for the 24k, especially smaller ones, and judging by how well it handled the hot rocks I wouldn't mind a larger size coil for ground coverage too. The total for the day. Very happy with the results.
  3. I've wanted the 24k since Whites released it, it was all too hard to get with Whites and their very limited worldwide distribution, Garrett is making that easier and has a much larger distribution network around the world so the 24k is becoming more accessible now than it was. I had this one sent from the USA to get it quickly as the New Zealand dealer isn't likely to have any until next year, although I think that'll change when they start getting people asking for them 🙂 I was pleased to see it came with rechargeable batteries to get me up and running fast, a good brand too being Duracell AA NiMH. So a few photos.... starting with the box. Whites fans will be pleased to see all the references to Whites on the box. That looks like Steve's scoop to me 🙂 And the box contents The charger and car adapter, lighter socket to USB adapter and also a power socket with various countries that is like a phone charger really, it just converts the AC to DC 5v 2.1 amp USB power, so you can use any USB charging adapter that can output the 2 amp's to charge your batteries. The charger will also charge on a common 1 amp USB port, it's just going to be slower. Very handy as I can charge the batteries in my Caravan or anywhere really with USB charging. The charger can also charge AAA batteries as well as the AA's required for the 24k, quite handy. The 12v alligator clips charger to lighter socket is very good quality too, nice thick cables and inline fuse. Even the little lighter socket to USB is a good quality product, came in a little package showing it's got a 2 year warranty. It's made by Aukey and has 2 x 2.4amp USB ports on it for fast charging. The charger has Micro USB and USB-C support, so you can use your phone charging cable if you've got one of the many Android phones using Micro USB and forget to bring your Garrett supplied cable. This is the batteries inside the mounting box that slides up into the back of the 24k. They're easy enough to put in there. The battery box has a nice Whites logo on it. You'll see I've already used the little plug they supply to cover over the headphone socket, Good to keep the dust and weather out and I'll likely leave it in there forever. The speaker on the 24k is excellent, nice loud volume so I see little need for headphones unless I'm next to a loud river or something detecting. The screen's nice and big, easy on the eye, every icon and bit of writing is oversized, quite good for people that need glasses I would guess. The buttons are nice and easy to use and you'll note they left the Whites logo on there. The coil's nice, I haven't weighed it yet but it feels light as a feather, and the detector is very well balanced with the batteries under the arm cuff, I've never used one of the Whites detectors with the box under the arm cuff, but I'm seeing how nice the balance is with this style detector. Garrett also supplied little feet to stick onto the bottom of the box so you're not resting the plastic box directly onto the ground, quite a good idea as I generally hunt in very rocky areas. One thing I noticed almost straight away as you don't have to put effort in when you put it down to prevent it from falling over, it naturally wants to sit upright. 🙂 And the back of the control pod, again another Whites logo I think they've done a good job paying homage to Whites, while also putting their own touches on it, a very impressive detector. Now for the meat and potatoes, I took it down behind my house to the river and fired it up, I had no idea what I was doing as I'd only used it for a few minutes but I took a couple of videos comparing how it was operating compared to my Equinox with the Coiltek 10x5" Nox Coil. Take these videos with a grain of salt, I've spent 5 minutes using the Garrett 24k but I found it very easy to use and understand, it can just be a turn on and go detector by the look of it. It handled the ground well, and I was very happy with the sensitivity of it, I absolutely can not wait to get the smaller coils for it, especially the concentric coil. I had put the Coiltek 5x10" Nox coil on the Equinox so it was more like comparing apples with apples and tested both detectors on a small #9 lead pellet. The 24k certainly had the edge on air test depth. The ground performance seems excellent too, I love how quiet it runs, the threshold is very smooth, it's also interesting you can run it right next to the Nox with no interference for either detector, both run fine right next to each other. The build quality of the Garrett seems excellent, the shaft nice and solid and nothing feels flimsy. In this video I take both for a little walk around showing how they handle this difficult ground that's covered in hot rocks. The 24k was completely free of knock sensitivity, something I'm going to find very beneficial with the areas I hunt being rocky. Both detectors have their settings maxed out, the Equinox is on 25 gain. Now I've got to get the batteries charged up so I can use it properly, at least they had enough charge in them from the factory for me to take it for a test run. We are in a 2 week Covid lockdown at the moment, we are expected to come out of the worst of it on Wednesday so hopefully I can go find some nuggets with the 24k soon, judging by my first impressions of it I am sure I will be able to achieve that quite quickly.
  4. I'm just back from a trip to Alaska, and was lucky enough to have a new Garrett Goldmaster 24K along on the trip, courtesy of Garrett Metal Detectors. For those that may be unaware, the Goldmaster 24K was developed by White's Electronics, and was acquired by Garrett when they purchased White's. The model was White's last new production model, and I am very familiar with the detector, having written a very detailed review of the White's version in 2018. See the link for lots of good information still applicable to the Garrett version. The newly released Garrett Goldmaster 24K is nearly identical, with the largest change being a switch from a tan to an all black color scheme. I liked that Garrett left the White's logo on the 24K while adding their own, acknowledging the heritage of the detector. I wish Garrett had been able to add their excellent high speed Z-Lynk wireless to the 24K, but I think that would have taken a FCC certification that would have added a lot of cost and time delay at this point in the process, where getting the model back on the market quickly is a priority. Luckily, the Z-Lynk can be added easily with Garrett's universal kit that will work on nearly all detectors made. Garrett has effectively lowered the price of the detector. It has an M.S.R.P of $799.95 but allows for discounting down to $679.95. Garrett is also including a rechargeable AA battery system and headphones, adding extra value to the package. The only thing lacking at this time are accessory coils, as Garrett reviews and revamps the coil selection. However, existing White's 24K and GMX coils are compatible with the detector. I expect not only more coils from Garrett, but good aftermarket support, as has always been the case with Garrett detectors. In any case, all the gold found in this report was found with the supplied 6”x10” DD coil. Items included with new Garrett Goldmaster 24K I used the Garrett 24K in a range of conditions in Alaska, staying almost exclusively in the all metal mode, and digging all targets. The location has some trash, but not enough to keep me from digging everything. The Garrett 24K does have excellent discrimination, but any discrimination can be foiled by tiny gold and ground minerals, so whenever possible I dig everything. I do admit I got into some places though where I used the probability meter to work though a couple high trash areas, but that was only for a couple hours at most. I normally use the 24K with the ground balance locked, leaving it unlocked just long enough to get a proper ground balance before tapping the lock button. However, for areas where I was running high sensitivity in mixed rocks, the ground tracking was very effective at smoothing out responses from hot rocks, eliminating them almost entirely after just a single repeat swing. Most of my use was in more homogenous conditions however, and so for me locked was the way to go. My biggest tip for Garrett 24K operators is to not overdrive the sensitivity. This is a very high gain detector, and trying to run it at full sensitivity under all conditions is a big mistake. Too much sensitivity will enhance hot rock responses and ground feedback. I like to scrub the coil on the ground in many cases, and simply lower the sensitivity until I can do so with the machine remaining stable. My settings were as low as 7 (range 0 - 10) and as high as 10, with audio boost enabled. See the owners manual for details. Alaska was doing the cool weather and rainy thing almost every day, so I really appreciated the 24K being very water resistant, and I felt no need to cover or otherwise go out of my way to keep the machine dry. The rechargeable batteries can give up to 45 hours of operating time per charge, making it possible to run for days without worrying about battery charging. Since the 24K uses eight AA batteries, carrying a set of regular alkaline batteries, or another charged set of rechargeable AA batteries, makes for an easy fix if the batteries should die while in use. This is really important in remote locations where charging may not be possible. Another nice feature is the included telescoping rod, which I used daily when I strapped the 24K to my ATV, and for running a shorter rod setup when working steep hillsides. The underarm battery box makes for a well balanced detector which stays upright when placed on the ground. I am not fond of detectors that like to tip over. The Garrett 24K has a wide range of adjustment options to please people who want lots of control for various ground conditions, but it can be absurdly easy to run the detector with basic all metal settings. I like that all settings are retained when the detector is shut off, so that once it is set for an area, it can be powered off and fired up in seconds, with no adjusting required. The Garrett 24K performed admirably, giving me 85 nice gold nuggets totaling 11 grams, or about one-third ounce of gold. The smallest bits were quite small, the smallest at 0.06 gram. I am very happy that Garrett brought the 24K back to the market, because it is an excellent and very affordable option, and one that I genuinely like. Thanks Garrett! Be sure and check out the Garrett 24K at the Garrett website, along with some videos by yours truly. Using Garrett Goldmaster 24K in a "scrape and detect" location 85 nuggets at 11 grams found by Steve H in Alaska with Garrett 24K
  5. Not sure if this has been covered before but I’d love to know how the Garrett 24K can handle heavily mineralised ground such as that found in Western Australia. Looking for fairly shallow nuggets amongst eye popping amounts of old iron trash targets. Yep, I’ve tried the Minelab PI machines with small DD and mono coils but I nearly threw myself down a mineshaft such was the frustration. I’m thinking a 6” sniping style coil is the way to go. Thanks for any advice, Tony
  6. I just found a new Garrett add for the Goldmaster 24k on YouTube and wanted to share it with all of you. I did not find it listed here on the forum and if I missed it and this is a repost, I apologize. The ad is 1.05 minutes long and labeled "NEW Garrett Gold Detector" and the link is Very "spiffy" ad and my "hats off" congratulations to Steve H. for his participation and the successful gold hunt. I sincerely hope that this ad brings in lots of business for Garrett. It is interesting to note that they give a very strong "hat tip" to Whites Electronics. Steve H.: If I posted this in the wrong location, please feel free to change its location as necessary.
  7. For those of you hoping that Steve is having a great time in Alaska but are missing his input and support on this forum, you may be able to get your daily dose of Steve through these excellent Garrett 24k Gold Master videos on Garrett's site. For anyone new to VLF detector gold prospecting, these videos (mostly by Steve) are outstanding, keep it simple guides to basic detector prospecting and for using a very hot detector on hot ground. Go to the VIDEOS heading next to HOW TO BUY. https://garrett.com/garrett-goldmaster-24k-metal-detector
  8. Simon has reported that NEL will be supporting the 24K, with availability before the end of the year. Great news, as a issue for me with some other models is lack of aftermarket options. A great coil selection counts for a lot with me, so this is excellent news indeed! I’d much prefer a Snake coil over the old White’s 4x6 DD with the added air space in the bottom, I was thinking of getting one of those and shaving the bottom off, but I’d rather have a NEL. Really good news, thanks Simon! The 3.5” x 6.5” Snake, just a perfect little coil for the 24K! Note that the Snake is specifically made to endure use without the scuff cover, great for scrubbing where every millimeter makes a difference.
  9. I've been following the 24k for a while now, especially since the news broke Garrett was going to be releasing it, the Whites version was far too difficult to get my hands on in NZ and when Garrett announced they were going to make it my hopes were high of being able to source one with them having a worldwide network of distributors. One is now on it's way to me and I look forward to it a lot. I think this detector will do very well in my area. I checked yesterday and there was just a back order system in place at Big Boys Hobbies, today that has changed to "in stock" So it looks like US dealers have now started to get stock of them so if you're after one you'd want to get in quick contacting your favourite dealer. https://bigboyshobbies.net/garrett-goldmaster-24k-metal-detector I asked them at Big Boys and they only have very limited stock however so if anyone is wanting one they'd be best to get in quick. It looks like they've been able to release it quicker than expected as I had the impression it was going to be October.
  10. Garrett's new Goldmaster 24k has been added to their website. Check out the instructional videos. Someone might look familiar. Hope Garrett comes out with the GMX waterproof version soon. https://garrett.com/garrett-goldmaster-24k-metal-detector
  11. The 24k was relatively short lived by comparison of other US made detectors that seem to hang about on the market for 10 to 25 years, being a US detector it was a bit difficult for me to ever get my hands on one and I guess I was just too slow at making the move on one. So I'm considering an alternative. I like my Gold Monster but it is a bit simplified and I prefer more options so I just use it as a pinpointer, at the moment my primary prospecting VLF is the Equinox, I rarely use anything else. I have a Gold Bug 2 but find it a bit primitive especially with features and I'd prefer a detector with Target ID's and the tiny gold improvement over the Nox I find is very minimal, the Nox has a great range of features and does a pretty good job but I'm wondering If I'd get a bit more out of a dedicated prospecting VLF with a higher frequency. Am I losing much not using a 24k and sticking with my Equinox? The Nokta Gold Kruzer seems a viable choice, it's extremely cheap and sitting in stock at my local dealer, it has Nel coil support which I absolutely think is a major bonus, the Nel snake coil is made for it, and to me this seems the ultimate prospecting coil. I have it for my Fisher Gold Bug Pro but that detector just doesn't cut it for depth on small gold for me as I live in a place with a majority of the gold being very small. I need a the best VLF for hot rocks possible. Why is it that Nokta detectors just aren't as popular, they seem to make a great range. The Gold Kruzer and Gold Racer are what people have wanted in VLF prospecting detectors, aftermarket coil support, features dripping off them, quality builds and water proof and so on yet you don't see them as detectors people are using. Why is this? Steve H had a Gold Kruzer, Gold Monster etc, etc.... yet ended up settling on the 24k instead. Is the 24k that much better than the Nokta? What made the 24k the keeper and the Nokta the one to go. Would I be better off waiting to see what Garrett come out with, with any luck Nel will make coils for Garrett's version of a 24k. I've never owned a Notka, I am a bit puzzled why they make such feature packed and on paper great looking detectors yet people aren't using them.
  12. I am new to gold prospecting and nugget hunting and just recently purchased a new Goldmaster 24k. To learn more about this endeavor I have been reading as much as possible on this and other forums. I have read comments on this forum that one advantage of the VLF detector is its ability to discriminate between gold and junk in areas of past or historic mining activity. And I have also read that the conductivity of gold will vary depending upon its purity. At the risk of sounding dumb and having missed the obvious, my question is this: How do I use the VLF to discriminate, find gold and avoid the trash in a trashy area that may have iron scrap, bird shot, empty 22 shell casings, aluminum foil and other modern and old trash? Thank you to all of you in advance for your patience and help.
  13. GARRETT METAL DETECTOR ANNOUNCES FIRST DETECTOR LAUNCH FROM THE WHITE’S ACQUISITION - Kevin Hoagland Van, Texas April 17, 2021 – Mr. Vaughan Garrett Senior Vice President, Marketing and Sales announced to the attendees of the Charles Garrett Memorial Hunt IV, the first co-branded Garrett – White’s detector will be the GoldMaster 24K aka. GMT 24K due for release mid-year 2021. Members of the Garrett team that I spoke with including Mr. Garrett shared with me that there are Garrett technologies they wish to incorporate into the GMT 24K before release but did not elaborate on what those upgrades may be. I'm very excited about this launch, which is just a month or so away, currently I own a GM 24K, I purchased just before COVID and wonder if we will qualify for an upgrade,if any are made. Maybe a grace period within 1 year of purchase would be fair to qualify. What are your thoughts you 24K owners? Co-branded. So Garrett GMT 24K? White’s GMT 24K by Garrett? Garrett/White’s 24K? I’d probably ditch the White’s moniker entirely, but they paid money for the name and want to leverage it. I’m not sure that works unless it was kept as a separate division. People are going to know it’s a Garrett, and that’s what it will probably get called anyway. Avoid the Nokta/Makro effect and keep it simple. Product name should roll off the tongue, not be a mouthful. So it’ll be Garrett 24K for me. Garrett additions? What does that mean? Maybe a tweak to the threshold as I felt a disconnect there. Better be the same housing, but I’m guessing not desert tan? Whatever, names and colors do not matter, just performance. Great move by Garrett! Goldmaster 24K Review
  14. Wow this news from Garrett Metal Detectors was definitely a surprise.! I didn't see this one coming. GPAA News by Kevin Hoagland mentioned this intro news this month.GARRETT METAL DETECTOR ANNOUNCES FIRST DETECTOR LAUNCH FROM THE WHITE’S ACQUISITIONKevin HoaglandVan, Texas April 17, 2021 – Mr. Vaughan Garrett Senior Vice President, Marketing and Sales announced to the attendees of the Charles Garrett Memorial Hunt IV, the first co-branded Garrett – White’s detector will be the GoldMaster 24K aka. GMT 24K due for release mid-year 2021.Members of the Garrett team that I spoke with including Mr. Garrett shared with me that there are Garrett technologies they wish to incorporate into the GMT 24K before release but did not elaborate on what those upgrades may be.I'm very excited about this launch, which is just a month or so away, currently I own a GM 24K ,I purchased just before COVID and wonder if we will qualify for an upgrade,if any are made. Maybe a grace period within 1 year of purchase would be fair to qualify.What are your thoughts you 24K owners? I wonder what they will rebrand to? GOLDMASTER 24K by Whites/Garrett or GOLDMASTER 24K by Garrett Metal Detectors? What do you think? I was gon a post this in the Garrett section but I'm sure I would get some stonethrowers or negative response. I'm tempted though,lol.
  15. I purchased a White's 24K this summer and am really liking this detector. Have an out cropping that I swing a Goldbug II over every year so it's been picked pretty clean, but was surprised to actually get a signal with the 24K and it turn out to be gold. Thinking when the 6x4 coil comes out I may finally say goodbye to the Goldbug II. Maybe. One issue I am having is that it will shut off after a couple hours use. It would start back up ok but after running a couple hours it would shut down on it's own again. Just curious if anyone else had encountered this issue? Contacted Whites but haven't heard anything back from them yet.
  16. I watched the youtube video of the guy from whites demonstrating the iron discrimination ability to wrap around to the 99 range by pressing the lock button while in discrimination mode. However, on my gmx it keeps only adjusting the ground balance offset, which is what happens normally when you press and hold the lock button. Any thoughts on what I am doing wrong? Id love to knockout 99 numbers. Nate
  17. A 24k with the same coils makes more sense, considering balance and weight. But the GMX come with the headphones and this package has the two coils I want the most for use in Australia. So the GMX won the coin toss. The GMX simply won because of that 6x4 DD coil, the added durability and waterproof capacity are great, but the lighter 24k has a lot of appeal. Goes to price and coil selection. The Minelab Equinox 800 with the smaller 6 inch coil, water proof, local support etc was a real competitor. The Equinox or its successor may later replace my Explorer Se Pro and Musketeer Advantage. This White's package with two coils and the headphones beat the local competition on local prices. So the GMX looks as if it will be my last new White's machine. Given the local lockdowns and restrictions in Melbourne Australia, I have not managed to dent my holiday/party budget. So that money instead goes to the GMX purchase. I'll be brewing my own coffee and baking my own muffins for a while yet, saving in the process... Santa came early this year.. All the best, take care and be kind to yourself and others.
  18. False signals every time the coil touches anything. Twigs above the coil touch the wire that plugs into my coil and it gives a false signal. If my coil touches the ground while I sweep I get pounded with false signals. I’ve cleaned the coil, lowered sensitivity, raised and lowered Vsat, locked ground balance and manually grabbed ground, discriminated. I’ve tried new frequencies, factory default, but it won’t stop. Any bump gives a signal. Any suggestions? My first nugget is so close I can smell it! Here are my last finds after 3 or 4 hours but had to stop due to the chatter from my detector.
  19. With all the money Minelab made in Africa it seems they should give this machine a good look since it is a very good machine for gold.I would like to see them bring out some epoxy filled coils too in a lot of different sizes. A 9 by 12 concentric first for water hunters or 8 by 11 dd .
  20. Has any one tested the Makro Gold Kruzer against one or the other of the White's detectors listed in the topic? Thanks! Walt
  21. When I use my Gmx with the 6' concentric coil in a beach section with a high concentration of black sand it is overloading all the time and I have to raise coil about an inch to have it go away.I then go for the nice zip sound and I usually get a coin because all the light stuff has been swept away. This 48kz machine is very hot with this coil.Would a bigger DD coil stop this overloading?
  22. The last time I took it to the beach I found only 1 penny while my friends found about 3.50 each plus 1 had a silver ring.It would not be hard to beat this total so off to a thin but very junky beach we went(different beach then other time).There were bottle caps galore and junk from the many fires this beach has at night plus what is dropped during the day.There was a good cut along the shore and I dug the nice zip sounds in this black sand section and got about 10 coins and 5 were nickels plus a junk iron ring.In 5 sens. setting the black sand would over load without there even being a target sometimes . It was that hot in this section.I then hunted in the tan sand and got a clean gold color chain that was iron.Toward the end of the hunt I got a nice tight zip and out came a moon 10k hoop earring at 1.6 grams.It is the first gold me and my friends have found on the dry sand with over 100 hours between us in hunting time.The GMX redeems it self on the beach and gives me 10 gold to be in the double digit gold club with OBN but still way behind him.I took it in a pond like area by a creek mouth and the machine did not act any different which is good.I might take it in the water next. I will try to get a picture tomorrow. I have to learn how to do it.
  23. I am going to write a little bit about my outings with the GMX. It will be fun and maybe I will be able to harvest some advice from more experienced detector/prospectors. I did go to a creek/swimming hole but had very little time with the detector. I have a very young family and it can be hard to concentrate when 1 of my 4 kids is getting hurt or stuck or .... so I gave up on it pretty quickly that day. I was able to get out to the Lynx Creek withdrawal area with a friend. He's new as well and using a Time Ranger Pro. I looked on Google Earth and picked out a wash that ran parallel with the main creek. That way we would be able to detect in and out on our hike. Unfortunately, the borders of the withdrawal area are not marked well on the maps I found available but the private claim the wash was on is marked really well once you get out there. We hiked along the fence for a while looking for area that might be interesting to detect. The only spot I found was a large hole. The material excavated was a different color than the surrounding soil so I dug a few iron targets from the pile. It doesn't seem like anyone has thoroughly gone through all that material with a detector and there are many hot rocks and pieces of iron mixed in with the material. Eventually, we hiked down to the main creek bed. My partner moved quite a bit faster than me and found many tin cans along the way. I tried to be as meticulous as I could whenever we found a wash to detect and found only one large can. I think I will bring him on my future trips and send him in front of me to remove large trash items. We detected up the mostly dry creek bed and dug trash target after trash target. I heard it was trashy here but I had no idea it would be this bad. The area had many hot rocks which would send my detector into overload if touched. I ended up needing to set the detector down to level 3 sensitivity just to get around without overloading constantly. All in all it was a fun outing with some rugged hiking and a near heart attack when a deer jumped up about 5 feet in front of me. I was using the 6inch concentric coil but would like to take the 4x6 double d out here and see if it is able to handle the hot rocks any better. Outing 3 was to the same area but I wanted to try the mineralization tracking feature of the detector. Lynx creek is more known for gold panning so I thought I might have better success that way. I swung it around and everything in the area is really mineralized. I was able to find a couple spots with a bit of an increase on the meter and it was really did seem like there was quite a bit more black sand in the areas the detector was interested in. I panned for a while in these areas but found no gold. After a while I wanted to try detecting up the hillside in front of me. It was pretty steep and, I thought, difficult enough to deter some prospectors. When I got up there it was definitely steep and full of loose rocks. I was only able to detect a small portion of the hillside but I found plenty bullets. Many of the loose rocks were quite hot. At this point I was getting better at listening to the detector and figuring out which sounds are hot rocks but it was still pretty challenging on this hillside I was worried about pushing one of the rocks out of the way and killing one of my kids who might have wandered underneath me. After a short time of this I could tell that my families patience had run out and we probably needed to head home, still gold-less Unfortunately, there is a new issue in this area. The management of the forest forgot to renew the mineral withdrawal and now large areas are now private claims. The area i had originally planned on going the 3rd outing was all claimed up with fresh signs everywhere. I can only assume fences will follow. In the end I don't know if Lynx Creek is a good area to detect. If I come out here again I will bring my TDI and see if that makes the hot rocks anymore bearable. I am digging all the targets anyway so I don't know if the discrimination afforded by the GMX is helping. I will try and head out again soon. Hopefully the temps here in AZ will go down soon and I can get into more of the GPAA claims in the area.
  24. The White's Goldmaster 24K is a new 48 kHz gold nugget detector released in the fall of 2018. Production models started shipping in September and White's forwarded one to me to check out. What follows are my thoughts after a couple days of detecting for gold on several northern Nevada nugget patches. The Goldmaster 24K marks a break with the past as White's moves from the older metal box designs of the past to newer plastic cases. The Goldmaster 24K physical design is the latest in the evolution of the MX series. The control box itself is derived directly from that used on the White's MX5. The control pod / display originated with the TreasurePro and later used in the MX Sport and MX7 designs. Basically the Goldmaster 24K is in the same housing and rod design as the White's MX7. Manufacturers face a difficult design choice these days. In general users want metal detectors to be as light as possible. However, weight is not everything - balance matters every bit as much. The problem is that a metal detector search coil is basically a weight on the end of a long stick. Coils can only be made so light due to engineering constraints requiring a certain amount of copper wire, and a reasonably robust coil housing. The coil therefore has a lot to do with determining the final ergonomics of the detector. If the coil weight is not balanced at the other end with some kind of offsetting weight, the detector is nose heavy. This in turn creates torque everytime the detector changes directions, which puts stress on the operators arm. The detector can be made as light as possible, or can be perfectly balanced, but it is almost impossible to do both in one detector. Any detector that weighs less than 3 pounds is almost certain to be nose heavy because enough weight does not exist to balance the weight of the coil. In order to have enough weight to work with it appears the minimum is about 3.5 lbs for detectors that are well balanced. The extra weight is almost always in the form of a battery box located under the elbow. White's has gone this route is the MX series designs with a battery box holding 8 AA batteries under the elbow acting as a balancing weight. This results not only in a well balanced detector but a detector with enough batteries to operate for multiple days between charges or battery changes. White's Goldmaster 24K metal detector for gold prospecting Another big choice manufacturers have to make these days is whether to use a straight rod or a "S" rod design. Users tend to be evenly split as to which they prefer, and so this is a choice the manufacturer cannot possibly win. About half the people are going to be unhappy whichever way you go. Industrial type users like beach hunters and prospectors tends to prefer straight rods. Coin, jewelry, and relic hunters seem more inclined to "S" rods. I have used many detectors with either setup, and have been happy with both or unhappy with both. The deciding factor for me has been more about the exact size, shape, and angle of the hand grip than the actual rod design. I do not have over-sized hands, and so I tend to prefer a smaller diameter grip. Other people like a larger grip. I went into all that detail to be sure the reader understands that weight and balance is very much a personal preference item. Getting a detector to fit right for everyone is like making a pair of boots that fits everyone. You can't do it. Therefore when I say that the MX physical design as employed in the Goldmaster 24K is a very good fit for me don't take that as meaning it will be great for you. Yet it is a very good fit for me, and quite comfortable on my arm, with just enough forward weight to keep my elbow in the arm cup without having to use the arm strap. The design is also lighter than the White's GMT by nearly half a pound, so the Goldmaster 24K is both well balanced and lighter than what came before. The Goldmaster 24K with 10" elliptical coil and with batteries installed weighs 3 lbs 7 oz (3.4 lbs) or 1562 grams on my digital postal scale. The Goldmaster 24K has an IP54 rated enclosure that has a high level of protection against dust particles, and a fair amount of protection against water. The coils are waterproof, but the detector itself is not submersible, so keep that display pod out of the water. The "S" rod is a three piece design with excellent quality twist locks that create a firm, wobble free rod assembly when fully engaged. The armrest position is not adjustable but it is well placed. The 24K is powered by eight AA batteries in a battery holder that pops out of the rear of the battery box. The 24K is supplied with eight alkaline AA batteries, but rechargeable batteries may be substituted for use in the battery holder. The 24K can get up to 40 hours operation using high quality alkaline batteries and while using headphones (external speakers use more power). The Goldmaster 24K does have a speaker built into the rear of the display pod, and there is a female 1/4" headphone jack directly above the battery door. White's thoughtfully includes a small plastic plug to insert into this hole when not in use. White's 24K battery holder and headphone jack location The Goldmaster 24K comes with a 5.5" x 10" DD coil as the stock coil. A 6.5" round concentric coil is available as an option. Scuff covers for the coil are not included with the detector or when you buy an accessory coil - they are separate optional items. The 5.5" x 10" DD search coil weighs 14.5 oz or 412 grams. The coil is 1" thick. The 6.5" round concentric coil is 3/4" thick and weighs 13.1 oz or 370 grams. Therefore the 24K when outfitted with the 6" concentric weighs in at 3 lbs 5 oz (3.3 lbs). White's possibly has a 13.5" x 8" DD available soon that weighs 1 lb 8 oz or 682 grams. Finally, a version of the 4" x 6" Shooter DD is in the works also. Neither of these coils is available for sale as of March 2019 (edit - they are now), so for now the GMK has one accessory coil (the 6" concentric) available for purchase. Do note that all pre-existing coils for other White's Goldmaster or GMT models are not compatible with the Goldmaster 24K. The 24K pumps about 50% more voltage to the coils than previous models, requiring tighter tolerances in the new coils. The coil connector has been changed to prevent confusion. 5.5" x 10" DD search coil and 6.5" round concentric coil for White's Goldmaster 24K The Goldmaster 24K shares many functions with the White's GMT model but there are differences. The most obvious being that the GMT uses knobs for control adjustments. The 24K uses a sealed touchpad which is more water and dust resistant, but some controls have secondary functions that necessitate having the Quick Guide near at hand when learning the detector. The 24K like the GMT does of course have a sensitivity control, and like on all hot VLF detectors it is a critical control. The solution to most problems regarding metal detector instability, or interference, is to reduce the sensitivity. The 24K features both automatic ground tracking, or a fixed ground balance, adjusted via a tap of a "ground grab" button. In this case the pinpoint button doubles as a ground grab when given a quick tap. Ground tracking can be a great function for variable ground and people new to detecting. Personally I prefer to lock the ground setting (via the "Lock" button) and update it manually via the ground grab function. I did use the ground tracking however, just to try it out. It is lightning quick, taking just a pump or two to track into the ground. Ground grabs are instantaneous. The White's GMT allowed for a locked ground balance to be tweaked up or down manually, via plus or minus buttons on the control pod. The 24K takes a slightly different route by allowing a "ground balance offset" to be dialed into the detector. The ground balance offset is a powerful feature, and so deserves some explanation. Prospectors often prefer manual ground balance because they can choose their own setting that for various reason might be different than what a machine will choose using a preset function like ground grab. Ground grab may be set to deliver a very neutral ground balance. The prospector may prefer that the balance be slightly positive to help enhance tiny nugget signals. They may want to choose a ground balance setting halfway between the ground itself and some pesky hot rock, which may mean adjusting either positive or negative from the neutral setting. This might require that the operator first do a ground grab, then hit the plus button a couple times to manually offset the ground balance. The 24K has a "Follow The Black Sand" mode like on the GMT, but it is now called Ground Scan. Ground Scan is enabled by pushing and holding the ground balance "Lock" button. While in Ground Scan the "Up" and "Down" buttons create a ground balance offset. This offset is retained when you leave Ground Scan mode, and will be applied both when doing a ground grab, and even while in ground tracking mode. The Ground Scan / Follow The Black Sand thing is intended to allow a prospector to locate and trace shallow magnetic sand deposits, that might indicate potential gold concentrations. This is a rarely used function, but including the offset ability means this function may be accessed more often just to create these ground balance offsets. With the GMT you could ground grab, and then manually tweak the setting, but the tweak had to be applied every time the ground grab is performed. Now the offset can be dialed in and automatically applied. The real zinger however is that this also allows the 24K ground tracking function to be directly tweaked - very, very rare indeed. Almost every detector I have ever used has a preset ground tracking circuit that puts the ground balance where it wants, end of story. With the White's Goldmaster 24K you can create a tracking offset, to deal with hot rocks in a way that simply can't be done with most other ground tracking systems. Really cool White's! White's Goldmaster 24K detector with optional 6" concentric coil The 24K has the volume control the GMT lacks, which is quite handy for those who want to run without headphones, but not necessarily at full volume. There are 8 levels of volume plus two boost settings, Boost 1 (b1) and Boost 2 (b2) that kick in when you adjust the volume control above 8. The GMT features a Variable Self Adjusting Threshold (V/SAT) control, that governs the rate at which the audio resets itself when passing over a target, or ground variations. The GMT has a knob that runs from 1 to 10, and on the Goldmaster 24K the SAT setting has been simplified to three settings - off, medium, and fast. The default setting of medium is all most people will ever need. However, in extreme low mineral ground the off setting can enhance weak signals, although the detector may need very careful coil control, and slower coil sweeps, to allow the circuit to keep up. Conversely, extreme high mineral variable ground may require the fast setting to smooth out variations in the ground signal. The threshold control itself is interesting. Normally on an old school threshold based all metal detector the all metal mode, and threshold, are one and the same. The Goldmaster 24K like some newer digital models appears to employ what is referred to as a "reference threshold". The threshold may be adjusted, but appears to be disconnected from the all metal channel, and is instead layered on in parallel. The SAT control above does directly affect the all metal channel as described above. Yet it does what it does whether the threshold is present or not. Reference thresholds often exist for the sole purpose of nulling, or going silent, when passing over items that have been discriminated out, but this does not happen when the Iron Cancel (see below) is engaged. While bench testing in all metal with the SAT set at zero, I thought I might just be able to hear a waver in the threshold. I would be interested in hearing from other nugget hunting experts on this matter, because in my opinion the threshold as it exists on the Goldmaster 24K, is not coupled to the all metal channel in the manner one would observe on the GMT for instance. The only effect seems to be with threshold completely off the 24K will no longer give any ground feedback at all if out of ground balance. Based purely on what I am observing in actual use I would say the 24K is a silent search detector, with a reference threshold added, as opposed to a true threshold based all metal circuit like on the GMT. The difference is subtle, but there for my ear at least, and if there is a connection there between threshold and all metal channel, it is too minimal for me to discern while in actual use. Now we get into the real meat of where the GMT and Goldmaster 24K part ways. The GMT has an iron (ferrous) probability meter as does the Goldmaster 24K. The GMT meter is merely a bar graph - far left means 10% chance of ferrous and far right means 90% chance of ferrous. Somewhere in the middle means 50% chance of ferrous. The Goldmaster 24K puts a blacked out block at the top of the screen with similar positioning, but the actual percentage numbers display out as a "target id" number. This is not a target id number as thought of on coin detectors, but instead intended to be a display of the odds that an item is non-ferrous. White's Goldmaster 24K controls and display screen If you look at the display above there is a colored bar at the top of the 24K LCD meter - red on left, wide yellow middle, and dark gray on right. The three colors taper one into the other to indicate overlap. The red on the right indicates the probable ferrous range, and dark gray indicates items reading too high to probably be gold, but more likely a copper, brass, or silver item (high conductors) or certain ferrous items that "wrap around" and "read high". These include hardened steel items like large bolts, almost any washers, ax heads, etc. In theory this scale could be used for coin detecting, but the coins with few exceptions like a nickel tend to bunch up all on the right. The intent really is to be more of a ferrous/non-ferrous meter, but I do think I could make do with this for some general detecting scenarios. In air tests a nickel read 88, zinc penny 95, dime 96, and quarter 97. The Goldmaster 24K has an Audio Mode button, that engages and disengages something analogous to the "Iron Grunt" feature on the GMT. Engaging the Audio Mode replaces the normal VCO type "zippy" audio with a simple high or low beep. Any meter reading below 50 will deliver the low "ferrous" beep and anything 50 or higher a high "non-ferrous" beep. Since the gold probability range runs much lower, this is helping the operator concentrate only on the high probability targets - anything with over a 50% chance of being non-ferrous. This "over 50% equals non-ferrous" audio mode could be useful for direct hunting in some situations. However, when pushing the detector hard in all metal mode, and then switching the Audio ID mode on, I found that I would have to reduce sensitivity, or encounter quite a few false signals in mineralized ground. That being the case I was more prone to using this as a ferrous check, by engaging the button for a quick audio reading, then back again to all metal mode. The Audio Mode as I described it above acts much like the Iron Grunt feature on the GMT, but on the GMT the ferrous audio alert only kicks in when there is an 85% or greater chance of the item being ferrous. It is not a certainty on how the percentages correlate, but the 24K audio ferrous tone does kick in at readings of 50 and below (greater than 50% chance of being ferrous). Borderline gold targets can read lower than this however, down into the 40s and even lower. A 30% chance of gold is still pretty good odds. So what to do now except read the numbers? White's has addressed this with another control, the Iron Cancel button. Engaging Iron Cancel activates an adjustable iron rejection setting. The default is for anything reading 15 or lower to simply not beep. This corresponds to the solid red area on the bar graph display at the top of the meter. Borderline or mixed content items will break up or give erratic readings. The best part however is that the setting can be adjusted from 0 all the way up to 62. This allows the operator to completely block out a chosen range of low end readings that is either more conservative or more aggressive than the Audio Mode preset. As noted before, the threshold, if any is used, will not blank over rejected items - they are simply ignored. I noted above that highly conductive items and some steel items can read at the very high end of the scale, typically 95 and above. If the goal really is gold, it is very unlikely that readings this high will be gold, and so White's also offers the ability to block out this high end range. Tapping the "lock" button while in the ferrous adjustment mode, will automatically block all readings of 94 and higher, which is where most iron high end false signals will occur. Other controls on the Goldmaster 24K - a pinpoint function, frequency shift to help avoid electrical interference, or for running two 24Ks close together, a backlight for the meter for low light conditions, and finally, a factory reset. White's Goldmaster 24K with stock 10" x 5.5" DD coil Now for the part everyone has been waiting for - how does the Goldmaster 24K at finding gold? When I test nugget detectors I tend to concentrate on smaller gold. First, because it is more plentiful, and easier to find in limited time frames for testing purposes. Realistically small gold also challenges the detector the most. A metal detector must be tuned as hot as possible to find very small bits of gold. Yet this also causes problems with mineralized ground and hot rocks. It is not so much the small gold sensitivity that matters, but how the metal detector handles the ground while tuned up for tiny gold. This is why air tests are minimally useful for nugget hunters. They can reveal theoretical information about how small or how deep a detector can find gold under perfect conditions. Air tests give no indication however of how the detector will handle bad ground, and hot rocks, when tuned to the max. A detector can air test extremely well and fail completely in the field. Therefore when you see my metal detector test reports, pay attention to the smallest nuggets I find, not the larger ones. The 10" DD coil is a good all around nugget hunting coil, with DD coils having the advantage for handling difficult ground. It was the 6.5" round concentric that wowed me, however, and after I got it on the detector I really did not want to take it off. The 10" DD will be a better choice for really bad ground, but lacks that magic edge on the tiniest bits of gold. I also appreciate that concentric coils are easier to pinpoint with, and generally have better ferrous identification performance compared to DD coils. One nice thing about the 24K being well balanced is the 13.5" x 8" coil is less nose heavy than would be the case for an unbalanced detector. This is the coil to use for covering ground in search of larger gold nuggets. For medium to milder ground, and the smaller gold, I really do like that little concentric. In particular there is a lot of grass growing in some desert areas, and the 24K with 6" coil was perfect for mowing through the grass to keep the coil on the ground. This is another area where an "S" shaft has the advantage. A straight shaft detector wants to roll to the side when forcing the coil against resistance, where a balanced "S" shaft being in line with your arm does not produce that kind of rollover torque. The 10" x 5.5" DD coil was a little more prone to false signals when bumped hard than the concentric coil, to the point where I could run higher sensitivity with the concentric on this particular ground. The ground in lots of Nevada is rather mild, often with alkali (salt) content, and it may or may not have bad hot rocks. This particular location had two types of hot rocks to deal with. The bottom line is I was able to run the concentric at full sensitivity of 10, and in audio boost 2 (b2) while in all metal mode and SAT set at medium (default). Even with the machine maxed out like this the detector ran well, and as I said before falsed less than the DD coil would if I attempted the same settings. White's new XGB ground balancing system really does seem to do a good job finding a setting that works well with both hot rocks, and the ground, by tracking multiple ground balance points. I liked to engage tracking, run over a mix of ground and hot rocks, and then lock the setting. I was scrubbing and pretty much digging everything. The Goldmaster 24K with the little concentric is hot as a pistol, and as usual if you give me a hot detector I was able to find some really tiny gold. The eight nuggets below weigh a total of 8.3 grains (not grams - 480 grains per Troy ounce). The largest nugget is 1.8 grains and the smallest are in that under 1/10th gain range. Now, none of these were super deep because you can't find tiny gold super deep, but they were all good zippy targets - and I was not using headphones! Gold nuggets found by Steve with new White's Goldmaster 24K - smallest under 1/10th grain The proof is in the pudding, and there is no doubt the Goldmaster 24K can find the gold, and some really small gold at that. I am not going to try and convince anyone that there is some kind of magic breakthrough here - at the end of the day the 24K is a hot 48 kHz single frequency metal detector just like the GMT in many regards. Some oldtimers may still prefer the GMT for its threshold being tightly connected to the all metal channel, while the threshold connection on the 24K is weaker. Although the Goldmaster 24K can be run hot and noisy, all its design features point to a detector that is intended to be set up as quiet as possible, and this may even mean running without a threshold. I did not see any evidence that this would really hurt the performance at all. This kind of quiet hunting tends to appeal more to people new to nugget detecting, especially those who cross over from coin detecting. Add this to the lighter weight and lower cost package, and White's has done a great job producing an alternative to the admittedly long in the tooth GMT. Steve Herschbach DetectorProspector.com White's Goldmaster 24K Data & User Reviews White's Goldmaster 24K Quick Start Guide White's Goldmaster 24K Advanced User Guide White's Goldmaster 24K XGB Ground Tracking Explained White's Goldmaster 24K & GMT Compared Little gold nugget on coil fresh out of the ground
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