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  1. I have been pretty consistent finding a few meteorites hunting the gold basin placers lately, nice finding something in between finding a nugget. I’m averaging at least a tiny piece of gold maybe about 75% of the time most of these have been shallow 3” down or less and ring strong out on the 6000 like a large caliber bullet on the surface, they are a great motivator to dig all the trash sounding targets because they sound just the same.
  2. Hi Guys, Found a possible meteorite near Coolgardie (West Australia) last Friday. I'm in the process of getting an authority to either confirm or decline it as a proper meteorite. I've had two agencies reply so far who are quite confident its the real deal and the most likely candidate is a 'H Chondrite'. It was found while I was gold detecting and produced a very strong signal on my Minelab 7000. Depth about 200mm. No other ironstones or hot-rocks in the area. Very quiet ground. Fingers crossed! Anyway, it was gently extracted with my plastic scoop in easy digging soil and came as 5 separate fragments that I managed to make fit together back home once I washed all the soil of them pretty nicely! Went together like a jigsaw! Here's some pictures. Cheers folks. Jim.
  3. It's not gold related, nor is it coin and relic but a lot of us also search for space rocks... talk about pennies from heaven... Jen It's
  4. It was a 1 in 100 billion chance but ... https://www.nytimes.com/2021/10/14/world/canada/meteorite-bed.html
  5. Good morning! Hoping for a little help with this rock. I found it with my Excal in the Boise river(South West Idaho). It was a faint dull sound with the Excal so I picked it up and tossed it in the bag hoping for some gold after I rinsed the sand off later. No signs of gold, but it is quite odd. Got the Equinox out at home and it reads -6 to -8 but faint. Maybe a meteorite of sorts? It was in an area of the river that has a fairly strong constant flow. Approximately 58g and 6cm x 3.5 cm x 2cm height. Appreciate any help!
  6. I need help identifying this rock please. I found this around Louisiana a few weeks back. To me it looks like raw Platinum or an ore maybe. I’m not really good at this yet haha. It’s not magnetic at all, it’s weight is 3.7 grams, and it’s streak is too hard to get, as it only scratches the plate. So possibly even a meteorite? Idk heh. Thanks you!!
  7. You can buy it this month at auction. https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/27190/lot/11/
  8. Today found me deep in the Nevada outback, searching for those elusive gold nuggets with my trusty Minelab GPZ 7000. Towards the end of the day, I heard a nice, narrow double target response from the detector, just like the small and shallow sub-gram nuggets make. After pinpointing the target with the edge of the GPZ 14 coil, I plunged my plastic scoop into the loose soil, where it encountered a rock about 3 or 4 inches deep. Removing it from the soil, I immediately noticed that the rock was unusually dense; rubbing the dirt from the stone revealed the familiar rusty tin can color and smooth, regmaglypted surface typical of a weathered chondrite. The stone meteorite had a couple of broken surfaces, so I carefully searched the area with the detector for more fragments and soon received another double target response that turned out to be another stone of about the same size and depth as the first, and around 8 feet downslope. The two fragments fit together perfectly, just like a jigsaw puzzle. This meteorite is my third Nevada cold find since 2008. Area where the two chondrite fragments were dug, one at just 3 o'clock of the detector coil, and the other at the tip of the scoop handle: The two fragments reunited, with a total mass of 276 grams:
  9. A meteorite is tracked back to its beginning with the help of a sky camera! https://www.livescience.com/meteorites-botswana-from-vesta-originally.html?utm_source=Selligent&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=LVS_newsletter&utm_content=LVS_newsletter+&utm_term=6578252&m_i=owCgqp5L9ntOMytAIIbJqm02cPRvhR40QaCjx5_rvwsSDtxaYE85ZhrzKKAZJxC6CO6K0WFQcLx9E9YxpvhnpNvFUNP8ktCo%2BQCYz_Zoon
  10. On my way to Rye Patch last Thursday morning about 1:17 AM I was on 395 and observed a meteor or 'fireball event' that was just incredible. I now see that there is a video that does not do it justice. Before I put a link to that video and those reports let me tell you what I saw and how I reported it. This is what I saw: About 20 minutes north of Ridgecrest on 395 I had just gotten out of my car. As soon as I opened the door I could see it coming. It was several objects burning in the sky with 6-7 separate streaks. It was a dark night and no moon. It was perfectly clear where I was and I thought I was just looking at a huge screen TV. The height seemed to be that of a commercial jet but this was much larger. It didn't remind me so much of a meteor as it did space junk. I guess we'll find out more about that later. It was just a coincidence that I stop at this particular time and place. I probably would not have seen it or I would not have seen as much of it if I was still in the 4Runner. Most of my report is in the report itself. So, what do you do when you see an 'event' of your own? Well, I drove all night to go looking for some gold at Rye Patch so that is what I did. That night I had to sleep. The next night I had a chance to get on the computer and ask the question 'What was that?' Where do you go, what do you do online to report something? As it turns out you go to REPORT A FIREBALL at the American Meteor Society. https://www.amsmeteors.org/ When you get there you can click on Report a Fireball. You will get asked a series of questions to describe what you saw in a technical way that will let the software develop a map of the event as you and hopefully many others saw it. You can upload pictures and video. You can also search for events from all over the world. So, I reported and I didn't see my report with the others. As it turned out there is a pending report file and if you don't state it as they are compiling it then your report will not be added. I now knew my event number was 4094 so I edited my report and it was added to the 29 others and still counting. It was a very, very neat experience. The video now posted on YouTube is only 1/100th of what I saw. I had better than a front row seat. I was in the middle and there were no heads or clouds in my way! Here is the report link: https://www.amsmeteors.org/members/imo_view/event/2018/4094 Here is the video: https://www.amsmeteors.org/videos/?video_id=1445 Mitchel
  11. Now this is a somewhat subjective category but maybe we can make our own and add others. What do you think is a famous meteorite? I would say Meteor Crater in Arizona. The meteorites in question are actually called Canyon Diablos. Here is a list from LiveScience and it doesn't include Canyon Diablos. https://www.livescience.com/15445-fallen-stars-gallery-famous-meteorites.html
  12. “A giant crater that was formed when a meteorite smashed into Earth, has been uncovered deep below Greenland’s ice sheets. The 31-kilometre-wide cavity was discovered by an international team of scientists who believe it was caused by a “rare” meteorite that struck Earth as recently as 12,000 years ago. Evidence suggests the crater was formed when a kilometre-wide iron meteorite penetrated seven kilometres into the Earth’s crust. Since then it has been buried under the thick ice of the Hiawatha Glacier in northwest Greenland. It is the first time ever that an impact crater of any size has been found underneath one of Earth’s continental ice sheets.” Click here for the rest of the story
  13. This family heard a thud and in the morning they found ... https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-56337876
  14. Rare meteorite found by gold fossickers sold to Geoscience Australia after lying undiscovered for 4.5 billion years - ABC News https://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2021-03-18/qld-gold-fossickers-sell-meteorite-to-geoscience-australia/100015142
  15. I eyeballed/ picked up a rock that looks sorta like an Apollo space capsule from a farm field.It has a paper thin black crust and grey interior where a farmers plow broke it, but my magnet won't stick to it. How do I tell if it is or isn't a meteorite? There is a parking lot there now. There are sparkles inside the rock. I hear there are stony meteorites that are not magnetic? I'll find the rock and post a photo later. -Tom
  16. There are thousands of meteorites discovered all over the world. Some areas preserve meteorites better than others. The oceans for instance degrade most of them and other climates make it nearly impossible to find them. When they are found they are studied and classified. This meteorite was: A lonely meteorite that landed in the Sahara Desert in 2020 is older than Earth. The primeval space rock is about 4.6 billion years old, and is the oldest known example of magma from space. This meteorite is an achondrite, a type of meteorite that comes from a parent body with a distinct crust and core, and lacks round mineral grains called chondrules, according to the Center for Meteorite Studies at Arizona State University. https://www.livescience.com/meteorite-asteroid-early-solar-system.html
  17. Christie's had an auction for meteorites. I read the results and the prices obtained were WAY over the estimates. You can also use these pictures as good meteorite ID photos in case you are wondering 'Do I have a meteorite.' https://onlineonly.christies.com/s/deep-impact-martian-lunar-other-rare-meteorites/lots/2006
  18. If you saw a meteor fall from the sky how would you find the meteorite? There are many cameras looking at the sky. A calculation can be made and give an estimate where the strike would happen. This would be the beginning of the trail and then eye witnesses would assist. This is what happened with this iron meteorite in Sweden. https://www.thelocal.se/20210223/meteorite-hunters-find-swedens-first-ever-new-fallen-iron-metoerite
  19. This is a really great paper describing how you can use the latest technology (AI) and algorithms to locate meteorites. Now just imagine what else you can find if you have the time and knowledge. There are a few here on this forum who will be enlightened by this article but certainly not surprised. It is just a matter of time that we process massive amounts of data quickly. https://arxiv.org/pdf/2009.13852.pdf
  20. Looking to get my annual meteorite fix, I recently embarked on a 3-day detecting trip to the famous Franconia meteorite strewn field in the beautiful Mohave desert of sunny Arizona. I arrived at my destination late afternoon and set up camp, which basically just consisted of parking my truck. Following a typical gorgeous desert sunset, the stillness of the night under the sky's star-filled canopy lent itself to the other-worldly ambience of camping in the midst of rocks from space. The following morning found me hiking into the heart of the strewn field, swinging the mighty Zed across a seemingly endless landscape of ridges and washes infested with basalt hot rocks. Undeterred after an half-hour with no targets, I finally received a signal at the base of a ridge that turned out to be a small 4 gram stony meteorite fragment. Slowly working my way upslope proved unsuccessful; that is until I topped the ridge and began hunting the wide, nearly level surface that stretched out before me. As I was skirting around a creosote bush with the detector coil, the GPZ 7000 sounded off with a sharp response. Pinpointing with the edge of the search coil revealed a sizable meteorite looking up at me - a sweet 68 gram beauty! Careful grid searching of the area soon produced another nice stone, this one weighing in at a hefty 53 grams. A few small irons were also unearthed, rounding out a perfect day in the strewn field. Detecting the surrounding area during the next two days netted a nice 13 gram stone, several irons, including a spectacular 8 gram piece (my second largest from Franconia), and numerous small stones and fragments. As always, a thoroughly enjoyable and productive Franconia trip. The total take is pictured below, with 156 grams of stony meteorites (above scale cube} and 14 grams of irons.
  21. Here is a meteorite with a great write up and pictures that I bet will expand your meteorite visual knowledge. http://www.tucsonmeteorites.com/mpodmain.asp?DD=02/02/2021
  22. If you want to look at a daily picture of a meteorite subscribe to this list. http://www.tucsonmeteorites.com/mpodmain.asp?DD=01/03/2021
  23. I found this rock years ago and had to hold on to it until I knew more about it. At first sight, I thought this rock was a turtle shell stuck in dried mud. Has crystallized breads on it and they can't be scratched with a utility knife. Vary heavy, the size of a vollyball. Not magnetic. Just wondering if anyone has seen or knows of rocks like this one?
  24. A bright green meteor streaked across the southern coast of Tasmania, Australia, and researchers caught the fireball on camera as it broke up over the ocean. The meteor lit up the night sky on Wednesday (Nov. 18) at 9:21 p.m. local Tasmanian time (5:21 a.m. EST and 1021 GMT). A livestream camera on the research vessel Investigator, which is operated by Australia’s national science agency, CSIRO, captured incredible views of the fireball as it descended from space and disintegrated above the Tasman Sea. https://www.space.com/bright-meteor-video-tasman-sea-november-2020.html
  25. The police found it! https://www.9news.com.au/national/queensland-police-find-rare-four-billion-year-old-meteorite-five-years-after-it-was-stolen-five-years-ago/29ef3c3a-bec6-4337-af84-31336bbfdc4d
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